Acheter neuf

ou
Identifiez-vous pour activer la commande 1-Click.
ou
en essayant gratuitement Amazon Premium pendant 30 jours. Votre inscription aura lieu lors du passage de la commande. En savoir plus.
Acheter d'occasion
D'occasion - Comme neuf Voir les détails
Prix : EUR 11,98

ou
 
   
Amazon Rachète votre article
Recevez un chèque-cadeau de EUR 0,76
Amazon Rachète cet article
Plus de choix
Vous l'avez déjà ? Vendez votre exemplaire ici
Désolé, cet article n'est pas disponible en
Image non disponible pour la
couleur :
Image non disponible

 
Dites-le à l'éditeur :
J'aimerais lire ce livre sur Kindle !

Vous n'avez pas encore de Kindle ? Achetez-le ici ou téléchargez une application de lecture gratuite.

1Q84: Books 1, 2 and 3 [Anglais] [Broché]

Haruki Murakami
4.3 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (6 commentaires client)
Prix : EUR 13,87 Livraison à EUR 0,01 En savoir plus.
  Tous les prix incluent la TVA
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Il ne reste plus que 9 exemplaire(s) en stock (d'autres exemplaires sont en cours d'acheminement).
Expédié et vendu par Amazon. Emballage cadeau disponible.
Voulez-vous le faire livrer le mardi 26 août ? Choisissez la livraison en 1 jour ouvré sur votre bon de commande. En savoir plus.
Vendez cet article - Prix de rachat jusqu'à EUR 0,76
Vendez 1Q84: Books 1, 2 and 3 contre un chèque-cadeau d'une valeur pouvant aller jusqu'à EUR 0,76, que vous pourrez ensuite utiliser sur tout le site Amazon.fr. Les valeurs de rachat peuvent varier (voir les critères d'éligibilité des produits). En savoir plus sur notre programme de reprise Amazon Rachète.

Offres spéciales et liens associés


Produits fréquemment achetés ensemble

1Q84: Books 1, 2 and 3 + Kafka on the shore + The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
Acheter les articles sélectionnés ensemble

Les clients ayant acheté cet article ont également acheté


Descriptions du produit

Extrait

Chapter 1

Aomame

DON'T LET APPEARANCES FOOL YOU

The taxi's radio was tuned to a classical FM broadcast. Janaìcek's Sinfonietta—probably not the ideal music to hear in a taxi caught in traffic. The middle-aged driver didn't seem to be listening very closely, either. With his mouth clamped shut, he stared straight ahead at the endless line of cars stretching out on the elevated expressway, like a veteran fisherman standing in the bow of his boat, reading the ominous confluence of two currents. Aomame settled into the broad back seat, closed her eyes, and listened to the music.

How many people could recognize Janaìcek's Sinfonietta after hearing just the first few bars? Probably somewhere between "very few" and "almost none." But for some reason, Aomame was one of the few who could.

Janaìcek composed his little symphony in 1926. He originally wrote the opening as a fanfare for a gymnastics festival. Aomame imagined 1926 Czechoslovakia: The First World War had ended, and the country was freed from the long rule of the Hapsburg Dynasty. As they enjoyed the peaceful respite visiting central Europe, people drank Pilsner beer in cafeìs and manufactured handsome light machine guns. Two years earlier, in utter obscurity, Franz Kafka had left the world behind. Soon Hitler would come out of nowhere and gobble up this beautiful little country in the blink of an eye, but at the time no one knew what hardships lay in store for them. This may be the most important proposition revealed by history: "At the time, no one knew what was coming." Listening to Janaìcek's music, Aomame imagined the carefree winds sweeping across the plains of Bohemia and thought about the vicissitudes of history.
In 1926 Japan's Taisho Emperor died, and the era name was changed to Showa. It was the beginning of a terrible, dark time in this country, too. The short interlude of modernism and democracy was ending, giving way to fascism.

Aomame loved history as much as she loved sports. She rarely read fiction, but history books could keep her occupied for hours. What she liked about history was the way all its facts were linked with particular dates and places. She did not find it especially difficult to remember historical dates. Even if she did not learn them by rote memorization, once she grasped the relationship of an event to its time and to the events preceding and following it, the date would come to her automatically. In both middle school and high school, she had always gotten the top grade on history exams. It puzzled her to hear someone say he had trouble learning dates. How could something so simple be a problem for anyone?

"Aomame" was her real name. Her grandfather on her father's side came from some little mountain town or village in Fukushima Prefecture, where there were supposedly a number of people who bore the name, written with exactly the same characters as the word for "green peas" and pronounced with the same four syllables, "Ah-oh-mah-meh." She had never been to the place, however. Her father had cut his ties with his family before her birth, just as her mother had done with her own family, so she had never met any of her grandparents. She didn't travel much, but on those rare occasions when she stayed in an unfamiliar city or town, she would always open the hotel's phone book to see if there were any Aomames in the area. She had never found a single one, and whenever she tried and failed, she felt like a lonely castaway on the open sea.

Telling people her name was always a bother. As soon as the name left her lips, the other person looked puzzled or confused.

"Miss Aomame?"

"Yes. Just like 'green peas.' "

Employers required her to have business cards printed, which only made things worse. People would stare at the card as if she had thrust a letter at them bearing bad news. When she announced her name on the telephone, she would often hear suppressed laughter. In waiting rooms at the doctor's or at public offices, people would look up at the sound of her name, curious to see what someone called "Green Peas" could look like.

Some people would get the name of the plant wrong and call her "Edamame" or "Soramame," whereupon she would gently correct them: "No, I'm not soybeans or fava beans, just green peas. Pretty close, though. Aomame." How many times in her thirty years had she heard the same remarks, the same feeble jokes about her name? My life might have been totally different if I hadn't been born with this name. If I had had an ordinary name like Sato or Tanaka or Suzuki, I could have lived a slightly more relaxed life or looked at people with somewhat more forgiving eyes. Perhaps.

Eyes closed, Aomame listened to the music, allowing the lovely unison of the brasses to sink into her brain. Just then it occurred to her that the sound quality was too good for a radio in a taxicab. Despite the rather low volume at which it was playing, the sound had true depth, and the overtones were clearly audible. She opened her eyes and leaned forward to study the dashboard stereo. The jet-black device shone with a proud gloss. She couldn't make out its brand name, but it was obviously high end, with lots of knobs and switches, the green numerals of the station readout clear against the black panel. This was not the kind of stereo you expected to see in an ordinary fleet cab.

She looked around at the cab's interior. She had been too absorbed in her own thoughts to notice until now, but this was no ordinary taxi. The high quality of the trim was evident, and the seat was especially comfortable. Above all, it was quiet. The car probably had extra sound insulation to keep noise out, like a soundproofed music studio. The driver probably owned his own cab. Many such owner-drivers would spare no expense on the upkeep of their automobiles. Moving only her eyes, Aomame searched for the driver's registration card, without success. This did not seem to be an illegal unlicensed cab, though. It had a standard taxi meter, which was ticking off the proper fare: 2,150 yen so far. Still, the registration card showing the driver's name was nowhere to be found.

"What a nice car," Aomame said, speaking to the driver's back. "So quiet. What kind is it?"

"Toyota Crown Royal Saloon," the driver replied succinctly. "The music sounds great in here." "It's a very quiet car. That's one reason I chose it. Toyota has some of the best sound-insulating technology in the world."

Aomame nodded and leaned back in her seat. There was something about the driver's way of speaking that bothered her, as though he were leaving something important unsaid. For example (and this is just one example), his remark on Toyota's impeccable sound insulation might be taken to mean that some other Toyota feature was less than impeccable. And each time he finished a sentence, there was a tiny but meaningful lump of silence left behind. This lump floated there, enclosed in the car's restricted space like an imaginary miniature cloud, giving Aomame a strangely unsettled feeling.

"It certainly is a quiet car," Aomame declared, as if to sweep the little cloud away. "And the stereo looks especially fine."

"Decisiveness was key when I bought it," the driver said, like a retired staff officer explaining a past military success. "I have to spend so much time in here, I want the best sound available. And—"

Aomame waited for what was to follow, but nothing followed. She closed her eyes again and concentrated on the music. She knew nothing about Janaìcek as a person, but she was quite sure that he never imagined that in 1984 someone would be listening to his composition in a hushed Toyota Crown Royal Saloon on the gridlocked elevated Metropolitan Expressway in Tokyo.

Why, though, Aomame wondered, had she instantly recognized the piece to be Janaìcek's Sinfonietta? And how did she know it had been composed in 1926? She was not a classical music fan, and she had no personal recollections involving Janaìcek, yet the moment she heard the opening bars, all her knowledge of the piece came to her by reflex, like a flock of birds swooping through an open window. The music gave her an odd, wrenching kind of feeling. There was no pain or unpleasantness involved, just a sensation that all the elements of her body were being physically wrung out. Aomame had no idea what was going on. CouldSinfonietta actually be giving me this weird feeling?

"Janaìcek," Aomame said half-consciously, though after the word emerged from her lips, she wanted to take it back.

"What's that, ma'am?"

"Janaìcek. The man who wrote this music."

"Never heard of him."

"Czech composer."

"Well-well," the driver said, seemingly impressed.

"Do you own this cab?" Aomame asked, hoping to change the subject.

"I do," the driver answered. After a brief pause, he added, "It's all mine. My second one."

"Very comfortable seats."

"Thank you, ma'am." Turning his head slightly in her direction, he asked, "By the way, are you in a hurry?"

"I have to meet someone in Shibuya. That's why I asked you to take the expressway."

"What time is your meeting?"

"Four thirty," Aomame said.

"Well, it's already three forty-five. You'll never make it."

"Is the backup that bad?"

"Looks like a major accident up ahead. This is no ordinary traffic jam. We've hardly moved for quite a while."

She wondered why the driver was not listening to traffic reports. The expressway had been brought to a standstill. He should be listening to updates on the taxi drivers' special radio station.

"You can tell it's an accident without hearing a traffic report?" Aomame asked.

"You can't trust them," he said with a hollow ring to his voice. "They're half lies. The Expressway Corporation only releases reports that suit its agenda. If you really want to know what's happening here and now, you've got to... --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Relié .

Revue de presse

"Murakami's magnum opus" (Japan Times)

"1Q84 has a range and sophistication that surpasses anything else in his oeuvre. It is his most achieved novel; an epic in which form and content are neatly aligned... So like Murakami himself, I'll borrow from Orwell: 1Q84 is quite simply doubleplusgood" (Independent on Sunday)

"1Q84 reads like a cross between Stieg Larsson and Roberto Bolano... In its bones, this novel is a thriller" (Daily Telegraph)

"Eerie, suspenseful and packed full of gorgeous ordinary details and provocative extraordinary events, Murakami takes weighty themes and delivers a compulsive tale that is funny, fresh and intensely surreal. Unmissable." (Marie Claire)

"It is a work of maddening brilliance and gripping originality, deceptively casual in style, but vibrating with wit, intellect and ambition" (The Times)

Détails sur le produit

  • Broché: 1328 pages
  • Editeur : Vintage (2 août 2012)
  • Collection : Vintage
  • Langue : Inconnu
  • ISBN-10: 0099578077
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099578079
  • Dimensions du produit: 19,8 x 13 x 6,2 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 4.3 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (6 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 5.180 en Livres anglais et étrangers (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres anglais et étrangers)
  •  Souhaitez-vous compléter ou améliorer les informations sur ce produit ? Ou faire modifier les images?


En savoir plus sur l'auteur

Né en 1949 à Kyoto et élevé à Kobe, Haruki Murakami a étudié le théâtre et le cinéma, puis a dirigé un club de jazz à Tokyo, avant d'enseigner dans diverses universités aux États-Unis. En 1995, suite au tremblement de terre de Kobe et à l'attentat du métro de Tokyo, il décide de rentrer au Japon.

Plusieurs fois favori pour le prix Nobel de littérature, Haruki Murakami a reçu le prestigieux Yomiuri Prize, le prix Kafka 2006, le prix de Jérusalem de la Liberté de l'individu dans la société 2009 et le grand prix de Catalogne 2011.

Traducteur de Fitzgerald, Irving et Chandler, il rencontre le succès avec son premier livre, "Écoute le chant du vent" (1979, à paraître chez Belfond), qui lui vaut de remporter le prix Gunzo. Suivront, notamment, "La Ballade de l'impossible" (Seuil, 1994 ; rééd. Belfond, 2007, 2011 - adaptée au cinéma en 2011 par Tran Anh Hung), "L'éléphant s'évapore" (Seuil, 1998 ; rééd. Belfond, 2008), "Chroniques de l'oiseau à ressort" (Seuil, 2001 ; 10/18, 2014), "Au sud de la frontière, à l'ouest du soleil" (Belfond, 2002 ; 10/18, 2003), "Après le tremblement de terre" (10/18, 2002), "Les Amants du Spoutnik" (Belfond, 2003 ; 10/18, 2004), "Kafka sur le rivage" (Belfond, 2006 ; 10/118, 2007), "Le Passage de la nuit" (Belfond, 2007 ; 10/18, 2008), L'éléphant s'évapore (Belfond, 2008 ; 10/18, 2009), "Saules aveugles, femme endormie" (Belfond, 2008 ; 10/18, 2010), "Autoportrait de l'auteur en coureur de fond" (Belfond, 2009 ; 10/18, 2011), "Sommeil" (Belfond, 2010 ; 10/18, 2011), "1Q84 - Livres 1, 2 & 3" (Belfond, 2011, 2012 ; 10/18, 2012), "Les Attaques de la boulangerie" (Belfond, 2012 ; 10/18, 2013) et "Underground" (Belfond, 2013 ; 10/18, 2014).

Dans ce livre (En savoir plus)
Parcourir les pages échantillon
Couverture | Copyright | Extrait | Quatrième de couverture
Rechercher dans ce livre:

Vendre une version numérique de ce livre dans la boutique Kindle.

Si vous êtes un éditeur ou un auteur et que vous disposez des droits numériques sur un livre, vous pouvez vendre la version numérique du livre dans notre boutique Kindle. En savoir plus

Quels sont les autres articles que les clients achètent après avoir regardé cet article?


Commentaires en ligne 

4 étoiles
0
3 étoiles
0
2 étoiles
0
4.3 étoiles sur 5
4.3 étoiles sur 5
Commentaires client les plus utiles
2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Imagination 7 septembre 2012
Format:Relié|Achat vérifié
Que demander mieux? Imagination, histoire compliquée, touchant à plusieurs sujets à la fois. Un plaisir. Heureusement que ce n'est pas fini de suite!
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Génial !! 17 février 2013
Par Viola
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Du grand Haruki san ! j'ai tout lu de lui, c'est mon auteur japonais préféré ! Dans ce livre, je trouve qu'il est au sommet de ce que l'on aime chez lui, ce mélange de simplicité dans le style, et cet imaginaire, confondant, débordant qui sait si bien en même temps épingler tous les travers de son époque !! A recommander à tous les fans d'Haruki et aux autres pour qu'il découvre ce grand auteur qui mériterait bien d'avoir quand même un jour le prix Nobel de littérature !
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Excellent condition 13 juillet 2014
Par Naomi Tam
Format:Broché
Le livre est en tres bonne condition et le livraison était vit.
Le prix est en bonne marche. Bon qualité, bon service, bon prix! Je vous recommande ce produit!
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
Vous voulez voir plus de commentaires sur cet article ?
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ?   Dites-le-nous

Discussions entre clients

Le forum concernant ce produit
Discussion Réponses Message le plus récent
Pas de discussions pour l'instant

Posez des questions, partagez votre opinion, gagnez en compréhension
Démarrer une nouvelle discussion
Thème:
Première publication:
Aller s'identifier
 

Rechercher parmi les discussions des clients
Rechercher dans toutes les discussions Amazon
   


Rechercher des articles similaires par rubrique


Commentaires

Souhaitez-vous compléter ou améliorer les informations sur ce produit ? Ou faire modifier les images?