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About a Boy
 
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About a Boy [Format Kindle]

Nick Hornby
4.6 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (8 commentaires client)

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Descriptions du produit

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Will Lightman is a Peter Pan for the 1990s. At 36, the terminally hip North Londoner is unmarried, hyper-concerned with his coolness quotient and blithely living off his father's novelty song royalties. Will sees himself as entirely lacking in hidden depths--and he's proud of it! The only trouble is, his friends are succumbing to responsibilities and children and he's increasingly left out in the cold. How can someone brilliantly equipped for meaningless relationships ensure that he'll continue to meet beautiful Julie Christie-like women and ensure that they'll throw him over before things get too profound? A brief encounter with a single mother sets Will off on his new career, that of "serial nice guy." As far as he's concerned--and remember, concern isn't his strong suit--he's the perfect catch for the young mother on the go. After an interlude of sexual bliss, she'll realise that her child isn't ready for a man in their life and Will can ride off into the Highgate sunset, where more damsels apparently await. The only catch is that the best way to meet these women is at single-parent get-togethers. In one of Nick Hornby's many hilarious (and embarrassing) scenes, Will falls into some serious misrepresentation at SPAT ("Single Parents-- Alone Together"), passing himself off as a bereft single dad: "There was, he thought, an emotional truth here somewhere, and he could see now that his role-playing had a previously unsuspected artistic element to it. He was acting, yes, but in the noblest, most profound sense of the word."

What interferes with Will's career arc, of course, is reality--in the shape of a 12-year-old boy who is in many ways his polar opposite. For Marcus, cool isn't even a possibility, let alone an issue. For starters, he's a victim at his new school. Things at home are pretty awful, too, since his musical-therapist mother seems increasingly in need of therapy herself. All Marcus can do is cobble together information with a mixture of incomprehension, innocence, self-blame and unfettered clear sight. As fans of Fever Pitch and High Fidelity already know, Hornby's insight into laddishness magically combines the serious and the hilarious. About a Boy continues his singular examination of masculine wish-fulfilment and fear. This time, though, the author lets women and children onto the playing field, forcing his feckless hero to leap over an entirely new--and entirely welcome--set of emotional hurdles.

Extrait

Chapter One

"So, have you split up now?"

"Are you being funny?"

People quite often thought Marcus was being funny when he wasn't. He couldn't understand it. Asking his mum whether she'd split up with Roger was a perfectly sensible question, he thought: they'd had a big row, then they'd gone off into the kitchen to talk quietly, and after a little while they'd come out looking serious, and Roger had come over to him, shaken his hand and wished him luck at his new school, and then he'd gone.

"Why would I want to be funny?"

"Well, what does it look like to you?"

"It looks to me like you've split up. But I just wanted to make sure."

"We've split up."

"So he's gone?"

"Yes, Marcus, he's gone."

He didn't think he'd ever get used to this business. He had quite liked Roger, and the three of them had been out a few times; now, apparently, he'd never see him again. He didn't mind, but it was weird if you thought about it. He'd once shared a toilet with Roger, when they were both busting for a pee after a car journey. You'd think that if you'd peed with someone you ought to keep in touch with them somehow.

"What about his pizza?" They'd just ordered three pizzas when the argument started, and they hadn't arrived yet.

"We'll share it. If we're hungry."

"They're big, though. And didn't he order one with pepperoni on it?" Marcus and his mother were vegetarians. Roger wasn't.

"We'll throw it away, then," she said.

"Or we could pick the pepperoni off. I don't think they give you much of it anyway. It's mostly cheese and tomato."

"Marcus, I'm not really thinking about the pizzas right now."

"OK. Sorry. Why did you split up?"

"Oh ... this and that. I don't really know how to explain it."

Marcus wasn't surprised that she couldn't explain what had happened. He'd heard more or less the whole argument, and he hadn't understood a word of it; there seemed to be a piece missing somewhere. When Marcus and his mum argued, you could hear the important bits: too much, too expensive, too late, too young, bad for your teeth, the other channel, homework, fruit. But when his mum and her boyfriends argued, you could listen for hours and still miss the point, the thing, the fruit and homework part of it. It was like they'd been told to argue and just came out with anything they could think of.

"Did he have another girlfriend?"

"I don't think so."

"Have you got another boyfriend?"

She laughed. "Who would that be? The guy who took the pizza orders? No, Marcus, I haven't got another boyfriend. That's not how it works. Not when you're a thirty-eight-year-old working mother. There's a time problem. Ha! There's an everything problem. Why? Does it bother you?"

"I dunno."

And he didn't know. His mum was sad, he knew that—she cried a lot now, more than she did before they moved to London—but he had no idea whether that was anything to do with boyfriends. He kind of hoped it was, because then it would all get sorted out. She would meet someone, and he would make her happy. Why not? His mum was pretty, he thought, and nice, and funny sometimes, and he reckoned there must be loads of blokes like Roger around. If it wasn't boyfriends, though, he didn't know what it could be, apart from something bad.

"Do you mind me having boyfriends?"

"No. Only Andrew."

"Well, yes, I know you didn't like Andrew. But generally? You don't mind the idea of it?"

"No. Course not."

"You've been really good about everything. Considering you've had two different sorts of life."

He understood what she meant. The first sort of life had ended four years ago, when he was eight and his mum and dad had split up; that was the normal, boring kind, with school and holidays and homework and weekend visits to grandparents. The second sort was messier, and there were more people and places in it: his mother's boyfriends and his dad's girlfriends; flats and houses; Cambridge and London. You wouldn't believe that so much could change just because a relationship ended, but he wasn't bothered. Sometimes he even thought he preferred the second sort of life to the first sort. More happened, and that had to be a good thing.

Apart from Roger, not much had happened in London yet. They'd only been here for a few weeks—they'd moved on the first day of the summer holidays—and so far it had been pretty boring. He had been to see two films with his mum, Home Alone 2, which wasn't as good as Home Alone 1, and Honey, I Blew Up the Kids, which wasn't as good as Honey, I Shrunk the Kids, and his mum had said that modern films were too commercial, and that when she was his age ... something, he couldn't remember what. And they'd been to have a look at his school, which was big and horrible, and wandered around their new neighbourhood, which was called Holloway, and had nice bits and ugly bits, and they'd had lots of talks about London, and the changes that were happening to them, and how they were all for the best, probably. But really they were sitting around waiting for their London lives to begin.

The pizzas arrived and they ate them straight out of the boxes.

"They're better than the ones we had in Cambridge, aren't they?" Marcus said cheerfully. It wasn't true: it was the same pizza company, but in Cambridge the pizzas hadn't had to travel so far, so they weren't quite as soggy. It was just that he thought he ought to say something optimistic. "Shall we watch TV?"

"If you want."

He found the remote control down the back of the sofa and zapped through the channels. He didn't want to watch any of the soaps, because soaps were full of trouble, and he was worried that the trouble in the soaps would remind his mum of the trouble she had in her own life. So they watched a nature programme about this sort of fish thing that lived right down at the bottom of caves and couldn't see anything, a fish that nobody could see the point of; he didn't think that Would remind his mum of anything, much.

—Reprinted from About a Boy by Nick Hornby by permission. Copyright © 1999, Dale Brown. All rights reserved. This excerpt, or any parts thereof, may not be reproduced in any form without permission.


Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 2137 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 324 pages
  • Pagination - ISBN de l'édition imprimée de référence : 1573227331
  • Editeur : Penguin; Édition : Re-issue (5 mai 2005)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B002RI9K9A
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Activé
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 4.6 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (8 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°26.552 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
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Commentaires en ligne

4.6 étoiles sur 5
4.6 étoiles sur 5
Commentaires client les plus utiles
2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 génial! 6 décembre 2009
Par N. Claire
Format:Broché
"About a boy" est un roman à la fois touchant et hilarant (on ne peut s'empêcher de sourire ou de glousser pendant toute la lecture, donc ne le lisez pas en public!). L'humour "so british" de Hornby est irrésistible. Les personnages st tous paumés ms attachants, les dialogues efficaces, l'histoire prenante. L'adaptation ciné avec Hugh Grant vaut aussi le détour!
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2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Un livre très sympa! 6 novembre 2010
Par Phil-Don TOP 500 COMMENTATEURS
Format:Poche
Will, célibataire dragueur et oisif, rencontre Marcus, gamin de 12 ans, décalé, mal dans sa peau, et dont la mère est dépressive. A partir de la rencontre de ces deux personnages, Nick Hornby nous livre un récit à la fois amusant et émouvant, léger et profond, et toujours divertissant. Bien sûr, les bons sentiments prédominent et l'on sait que cela finira sur un 'happy end', mais l'auteur a le bon goût de ne pas tomber dans le piège d'une mièvrerie indigeste. Au final, voilà donc un livre très agréable à lire, amusant, pourquoi bouder son plaisir?
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5 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 un livre optimiste 2 décembre 2002
Par Un client
Format:Broché
Le debut du livre est un peu lent mais l'interet croit au fur et a mesure de la lecture et finalement on lit tout le livre d'une traite. Les personnages semblent issus de notre quotidien, mais ils sont toujours presentes avec beaucoup d'humour et un peu de derision vis-s-vis d'eux-memes. Le tout reste tres positif dans la mesure ou les personnages qui sont tous un peu marginaux trouvent une solution tres personnelle a leurs problemes, c'est ce qui cree le suspens du livre.
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 Perfect 4 mars 2013
Format:Poche|Achat vérifié
I just begin to read it. And i already love this story =D I like how quick it has been sending ^^
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