Commencez à lire Again, Dangerous Visions (English Edition) sur votre Kindle dans moins d'une minute. Vous n'avez pas encore de Kindle ? Achetez-le ici Ou commencez à lire dès maintenant avec l'une de nos applications de lecture Kindle gratuites.

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

 
 
 

Essai gratuit

Découvrez gratuitement un extrait de ce titre

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Tout le monde peut lire les livres Kindle, même sans un appareil Kindle, grâce à l'appli Kindle GRATUITE pour les smartphones, les tablettes et les ordinateurs.
Again, Dangerous Visions (English Edition)
 
Agrandissez cette image
 

Again, Dangerous Visions (English Edition) [Format Kindle]

Harlan Ellison

Prix conseillé : EUR 10,29 De quoi s'agit-il ?
Prix éditeur - format imprimé : EUR 18,65
Prix Kindle : EUR 7,20 TTC & envoi gratuit via réseau sans fil par Amazon Whispernet
Économisez : EUR 11,45 (61%)

Formats

Prix Amazon Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle EUR 7,20  
Broché EUR 20,36  
Broché EUR 18,20  
Chaque jour, un ebook avec au moins 60% de réduction
Découvrez l'Offre Éclair Kindle et inscrivez-vous à la Newsletter Offre Éclair Kindle pour ne rater aucun ebook à prix exceptionnel. Abonnez-vous dès maintenant



Le Pack de la Rentrée : 24 applis offertes, plus de 50 euros d'économies, jusqu'au 4 septembre sur l'App-Shop pour Android. Profitez-en et partagez la nouvelle. En savoir plus.


Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

Over the course of his legendary career, Harlan Ellison has defied—and sometimes defined—modern fantasy literature, all while refusing to allow any genre to claim him. A Grand Master of the Science Fiction Writers of America, winner of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Horror Writers Association as well as winner of countless awards, including the Hugo, Nebula, Edgar Allan Poe, and Bram Stoker, Ellison is as unpredictable as he is unique, irrepressible as he is infuriating.
 
Over thirty titles in Ellison’s brilliant catalog are now available in an elegant new package featuring Ellison himself. Genius never felt so combustible. Again, Dangerous Visions is the classic companion to the most essential science fiction anthology ever published, and includes forty-six original stories edited and with introductions by Harlan Ellison, featuring John Heidenry, Ross Rocklynne, Ursula K. Le Guin, Andrew J. Offutt, Gene Wolfe, Ray Nelson, Ray Bradbury, Chad Oliver, Edward Bryant, Kate Wilhelm, James B. Hemesath, Joanna Russ, Kurt Vonnegut, T. L. Sherred, K. M. O’Donnell (Barry N. Malzberg), H. H. Hollis, Bernard Wolfe, David Gerrold, Piers Anthony, Lee Hoffman, Gahan Wilson, Joan Bernott, Gregory Benford, Evelyn Lief, James Sallis, Josephine Saxton, Ken McCullough, David Kerr, Burt K. Filer, Richard Hill, Leonard Tushnet, Ben Bova, Dean Koontz, James Blish and Judith Ann Lawrence, A. Parra (y Figueredo), Thomas M. Disch, Richard A. Lupoff, M. John Harrison, Robin Scott, Andrew Weiner, Terry Carr, and James Tiptree Jr.


Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 2021 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 754 pages
  • Editeur : Open Road Media Sci-Fi & Fantasy (1 avril 2014)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B00J90EO6S
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°276.956 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
  •  Souhaitez-vous faire modifier les images ?


En savoir plus sur l'auteur

Découvrez des livres, informez-vous sur les écrivains, lisez des blogs d'auteurs et bien plus encore.

Commentaires en ligne 

Il n'y a pas encore de commentaires clients sur Amazon.fr
5 étoiles
4 étoiles
3 étoiles
2 étoiles
1 étoiles
Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.4 étoiles sur 5  7 commentaires
8 internautes sur 10 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Forbidden Science Fiction from the 70's 8 avril 2000
Par "ikvw" - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
To anyone who has read the original collection of science fiction stories by renowned Sci-Fi masters of the 70's that Harlan Ellison released, this sequel packs all these that were missed, such as Philip Jose Farmer's "Riders of the Purple Wage". Even doubters of repeat success will enjoy this book, as the one refreshing rule (rarely broken) is that each author could only submit ONE story. There were no other rules.
Oh yeah, and Kurt Vonnegut's in it too!
2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Excellent Stories From a Remarkable Anthology 26 août 2013
Par Jym Cherry - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
I read "Dangerous Visions (SF Masterworks)" when I was 20 or 21 and Harlan Ellison's introductions impressed upon me. As an aspiring writer it was educational to read of how the writers came up with their ideas and of course there were the stories that were of a remarkable quality. "Again, Dangerous Visions" impresses for completely different reasons.

"Again, Dangerous Visions" was published in 1971 and these stories impress for their explorations of changing moralities which demonstrate that if there is an equal and opposite reaction for every action then some of those reactions can't be anticipated and might not lead to the utopia we envisioned that the change provide. The writers of "Again, Dangerous Visions" explore and extrapolate on the issues of the day showing us what could happen. The stories are still relevant today because each generation is confronted with similar issues. The technology may change but the choices don't.

In reading "Again, Dangerous Visions" you find some commonalities in the stories, for instance all the writers who wrote of a future Earth write of one that is so polluted man has had to abandon it, or if man has stayed can literally be eaten by the affects of pollution. No story in "Again, Dangerous Visions" was written later than 1971 so some of the political and social changes to ward off the pessimistic outlooks of these writers was not certain or clear.

In one case of synchronicity by two authors, Ursula LeGuin and Joanna Russ their stories seem like they could be companion pieces or different chapters of the same book. Remarkable for an anthology.

Although, "Again, Dangerous Visions" contains authors I didn't think I'd like (Dean Koontz, Thomas Disch), I was surprised that I liked their stories and even found myself wanting to read more of their stories. After 42 years "Again, Dangerous Visions" still has the power to introduce new writing (if not new writers, although for the most part these writers were new to the public in 1971) to a new audience.

Despite the stories' age and the time of publication at the end of the "60's", the 60's didn't really end until 1971, only one of the stories seems dated by the times or vernacular of the characters.

Though some may complain of Ellison's introductions to the stories, I find his writing a pleasure to read (see my reviews of "The Glass Teat" and "Harlan Ellisons Watching"), providing insight and personal recollections of the writers he includes in the book. In some cases his stewardship brings about the best in the writers contributing to the book. Just waiting for "The Last Dangerous Visions" Harlan!
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Includes my favorite story. 4 avril 2013
Par King of Controversy - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
Most of the stories in this sequel to Dangerous Visions are below average. Again, Dangerous Visions happens to include my favorite story 'Moth Race' by Richard Hill. It also includes, 'With the Bentfin Boomer Boys on Little Old New Alabama' by Dick Lupoff' a story about a colony of whites at war with a colony of blacks. This story will be the focus of my review.

The story was hyped by the editor as, "Friends, there has never been a thing like this one before, in or out of the field of SF. One expects some eye-openers... but nothing like Lupoff. He takes the solid gold award for chutzpah Above and Beyond the limits of Gall... frankly, had no other story than this one been written for Again, Dangerous Visions, the book would have been worth reading." It was nominated for a Nebula award but didn't win. When I watched the war movie Saving Private Ryan a scene in the movie would remind me of this story.

'Boomer Boys' is dangerous because it's told from the point of view of the racist 'New Alabamans' who are at war with the planet 'New Haiti'. The story is told in part through a succession of speeches the New Alabama leadership give - as observed through the eyes of the servicemen 'gyrenes' in the story.

The first speech is given at the end of the soldiers training, "who ever said anybody needed - a commencement speech - to tell him to blast the uppities out of black space... some bigbellied Senator from Talledega? Sheeh! What if it was the Governor himself? what could he say about the war that everybody didn't know already anyhow? We all knew what would happen... the same thing that happened on O'Earth, before the Jewrabs pushed everybody else out and left the colony worlds to shift for themselves. Who needs speeches?"

The second speech is seen from guard duty at a conference of the friendly planets, 'N'Missa', 'N'Maddoxia', 'N'Transvaal', 'N'Boer Republic', "I can well imagine how some of you - Ole Guv Youngerman, he lookin around to see who's pain attention & who's more interested in studyin his fingernails - how some of you - Ole Guv resumes - matt wonder how come we can't smash them nigra brutes with proven superiority of our kind... I'll be perfectly frank with yall, - Old Guv he looken almost fit to cry now - we taken a thorough whompin in this war... yall have to give us some help. Now that's all there is to it."

The third speech is before a big battle in space, "Colonel-General 'Pissfire' Pallbox, addressed the men. -Umen- are the finest fightin force in the en-tire planetary military establishment. - He spit on the deck., Some swabby wone like that! -M the N'Alabama planetary military establishment - his voice rising - being the finest fightin force among the pure surn white planets under God & His Son Jesus George Christ! - M the pure surn white planets - ole Pissfire hollern rantin now, snappin his official spacerine issue galluses m turnin from side to side - being the toughest, meanest, wild-spit-in-the-eye-&-kick-em-in-the-nuts bunch of ball-barren men in the entire galaxy!"

It's easy enough to like the young 'gyrenes' in the story Gordon Wallace and Freddie, though the story does poke fun at them or at least their society - in one case they walk by a newspaper box, "Noozes: WARGOZWELL ENEMYFALLZBACK BLACK CASUALTIZRIEZ PAPADOCS LOZING. Y Bi Noozes? Headlines allasame allagame allafine allatime. Win win win. So: Why no fizem sidewalcracks, streetlights, build some houses? Afterwarz uvocrz". Sayings have changed over time, "Rise Agin!", "Lawnorder", "I'm dreaming of a white kiss miss."

The crux of the story takes place in a seedy night club. Their sergeant takes Gordon Wallace and Freddie to the club their last night before deployment. 'Miss Markum' performs a dance there for the crowd. Her dance is interrupted by a black male on stage, even their sarge "does a double take", "but no. He's white only daubed", "Curled around her jelly hip what's that black what's that? A handle it has she grasps and uncoils a whip. Maidenhood defended. Now willya see him cringe and crawl... hear him whine (phwapp!) good O God O finefinefineO go Miss Markum and crack! the people lose their mind the cheers the screams the hips, hips working, losing minds, pelvis grinds tears cheers, Miss Markum Truimphant calls defiant independent slogan: Never!"

N'Haiti does win the war. They solve their manpower shortage by reanimating the war dead: creating zombies. At one point in the story Gordon asks to himself, "Why so many N'Alabama ships carry N'Missa names?"

The story ends back at the same night club after the war. Freddie now works there. Miss Markum still works there too, catering now to the victors. Things are reversed. Miss Markum is made up to look quite, quite dark, and a white N'Alabama southern man, jumps out and tries to grab her. The show must go on. At the start of the show the Emcee proclaims, "A dramatic interpretation ladies m gentlemen, music m drama m dance combine to present a traditional reenactment." Freddie is actually the southern man in the show, facing the whip, "Freddie howls (it's part of the act, right, but Miss Markum do you gotta make it so real!)." A very dark Miss Markham gives him one final push down with her heel.

What seems dangerous to me is, do the 'N'Alabamans' (who have an entire planet to themselves) really have to be so obsessed with race/the greatness of their race? Of course the words 'traditional reenactment' there at the end are a bit unnerving as well.

I think this story may have been influenced by the impressive story 'New Riders of the Purple Wage' in the previous Dangerous Visions anthology - a story that, on the surface, is a satire of the socialist nanny state. 'New Alabama' included here, on the surface level is a satire of the racist fringe. In fact, I would go further than suggesting one story was a response to the other. I would go further and suggest the entire Dangerous Visions project - Dangerous Visions, Again Dangerous Visions (and the never completed) Last Dangerous Visions, the entire project may have been designed to get this one story in print.

Most of the other stories in the anthology aren't very good. Again, Dangerous Visions didn't sell very well. It was panned when it was reviewed and it's on few library shelves. Because of the difficult Southern accents some who bought the book may have skipped the story. Elsewhere on the web it was given a review (echoing the anthologies editor) that simply said, worth reading for this one story alone, "a truly dangerous vision and a hoot to boot."
4.0 étoiles sur 5 The original not-ready-for-prime-time Sci-Fi 22 juin 2014
Par Kelli Norris - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
I have enjoyed this book since its publication years ago, and just bought it again for my kindle (as my old books molder in the bookshelf). The stories are outlandish and vulgar, and some oddly humorous. A few are idiotic and in bad taste, but are memorable and make profound statements. <sex and F-bomb alert> This is some of the earlier "bad boy" science fiction from the early 1970's, This was kind of an "experiment" by Harlan Ellison in the day, though It does not seem so edgy in 2014, I think the Dangerous Visions books (this is the sequel to the first from the late 60's) is worth the read for science fiction aficionados.
0 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
2.0 étoiles sur 5 Not Free SF Reader 8 juin 2008
Par Blue Tyson - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
No surprise that no-one wanted to publish the last of these anthologies, it seems, as this one is extremely weak, at a paltry 2.94. Whole piles of average, and a fair helping of bad, too.

Again Dangerous Visions 2 : Soundless Evening - Lee Hoffman
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : [*] - Gahan Wilson
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : The Test-Tube Creature, Afterward - Joan Bernott
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : And the Sea Like Mirrors - Gregory Benford
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : Bed Sheets Are White - Evelyn Lief
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : At the Fitting Shop - James Sallis
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : American Dream - James Sallis
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : Elouise and the Doctors of the Planet Pergamon - Josephine Saxton
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : Chuck Berry Won't You Please Come Home? - Ken McCullough
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : Epiphany for Aliens - David Kerr
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : Eye of the Beholder - Burt K. Filer
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : Moth Race - Richard Hill
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : In re Glover - Leonard Tushnet
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : Zero Gee - Ben Bova
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : A Mouse in the Walls of the Global Village - Dean R. Koontz
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : Getting Along - James Blish and Judith Ann Lawrence
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : Totenbüch - Parra y Figuéredo
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : Things Lost - Thomas M. Disch
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : With the Bentfin Boomer Boys on Little Old New Alabama - Richard A. Lupoff
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : Lamia Mutable - M. John Harrison
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : Last Train to Kankakee - Robin Scott
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : Empire of the Sun - Andrew Weiner
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : Ozymandias - Terry Carr
Again Dangerous Visions 2 : The Milk of Paradise - James TiptreeJr.

Kid cwt-off.

3 out of 5

Alien veggies.

3 out of 5

Better get rid of h3r.

2.5 out of 5

Swarmer Skimmer shock.

3.5 out of 5

Certainly can't get away with this one.

2.5 out of 5

Pisser model.

3 out of 5

Wife whacker.

2 out of 5

Congenital gyno improvement hope.

3 out of 5

Got the woofer blues, Stiff.

3 out of 5

Neanderthaloid stalking.

3 out of 5

Antigrav hunt.

3.5 out of 5

No good odds here, even for the champ.

3.5 out of 5

Power failure cryo-oops.

3.5 out of 5

More than Mile High manipulation.

3.5 out of 5

Stunted attack.

3 out of 5

13 Ghost parodies.

2.5 out of 5

The old evil ratzi woman story.

3 out of 5

Star-Mouse ship scribbling.

3 out of 5

You got your space voodoo, so you got yer space zombies, and still splenty of yer space rednecks.

3 out of 5

Skinless killer.

3 out of 5

Woke up late.

3 out of 5

Carter cartoon.

2 out of 5

Old, scared and sleeping.

2.5 out of 5

Big grotty Crotties.

3 out of 5
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ?   Dites-le-nous

Discussions entre clients

Le forum concernant ce produit
Discussion Réponses Message le plus récent
Pas de discussions pour l'instant

Posez des questions, partagez votre opinion, gagnez en compréhension
Démarrer une nouvelle discussion
Thème:
Première publication:
Aller s'identifier
 

Rechercher parmi les discussions des clients
Rechercher dans toutes les discussions Amazon
   


Rechercher des articles similaires par rubrique