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Andrew Moore: Detroit Disassembled (Anglais) Relié – 25 mars 2010


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Andrew Moore: Detroit Disassembled + Beauty in Decay: The Art of Urban Exploration + Beauty in decay II
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Amazon.com: 32 commentaires
35 internautes sur 36 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Motor city madness 17 juin 2010
Par Robin Benson - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
To quote from the Product Description above: 'Today, whole sections of the city resemble a war zone, its once-spectacular architectural grandeur reduced to vacant ruins'. Most of us, of course, don't have personal experience of war zones but we can all pull up a mental picture which is probably partially accurate. Andrew Moore's quite extraordinary photos will confirm your mental image but the freaky thing is that Detroit is no war zone. The population didn't leave because of bombs or military intervention; mostly they didn't even leave but continue to survive amongst all this decaying industrial, public and private building detritus.

The thing that grabbed me and Moore's photos reveal it so often is the amount of physical equipment that was just left as buildings were abandoned. Page twenty-three shows a huge open-plan room of the Detroit Schools Book Depository, the whole floor covered with books that are slowly decaying. Page fifty-five has an amazing shot of one side of the Cass Tech High School, minus sixteen large classroom windows to reveal a jumble of desks, chairs, tables, casual seating and books and papers everywhere. Again at Cass, Moore spotted a wall clock with a plastic dial, part of which melted over the hour and minute hands, the only time you'll ever see a real Dali timepiece.

Several exterior shots of houses show them either collapsing or showing signs of heavy amateurish DIY. Page ninety-six has a house totally covered in foliage with just a sliver of the roof to be seen confirming that it is two stories. Some interiors really do look like bomb damage, with falling walls and ceilings. The circular lobby of the downtown United Artists Theater reveals some of the steel structure because chunks of the plaster have fallen off.

Moore's photos reveal disaster Detroit in beautiful even color throughout the book and 300 screen printing on a good matt art plus the large page size delivers a punch to these seventy amazing images.

The book obviously raises questions about urban decay and is Detroit the ultimate throwaway society city by the nature of what can be seen there. It also acts as a magnet for creative snappers. Photographers Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre: The Ruins of Detroit cover the the city but in a much more ambitious book of color photos. There are several shots repeated in both titles: the melted clock face, classrooms in the Cass Technical High school and a straight on photo of a house (the corner of Brush and Erskine) that is almost identical to one in Moore's book on page ninety-seven.
7 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Big Book, Big Subject 26 septembre 2011
Par Jeffrey C. Chouinard - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
This is a large picture book in which high-resolution photographs are presented in a large format. The images are appalling, heart-breaking, and strangely beautiful, all at the same time. The atmosphere is post-apocalyptic. Soaked schoolbooks are plumped up in clumps of mold, abandoned auto assembly lines are rusting, and green moss covers office floors. Cavernous railroad stations, ornate movie theaters, and fancy ballrooms crumble and rot. If this is the future of rust-belt cities, the forecast is alarming. It does remind me of Piranesi's 18th-century engravings of the ancient Roman Forum when it was a column-studded cow pasture ignored by time.

Jeff Chouinard
5 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Stunning Pictures 11 novembre 2011
Par Adam - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
Great pictures that will never fail to start a discussion about where we asa nation are going, and what needs to change.
2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
A disappearing city 25 juillet 2013
Par Mary Jane R. - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
Many of these places are now gone and I'm glad to see them not only preserved in these photos but also captured so they reveal their last glimpse of beauty. Some of the images are truly beautiful in a heart-shattering way. I'm not thrilled that the author is not local to Detroit and though he has a good eye for composition, I wonder how much further this could have been taken with someone who was more at home in these buildings. I still really recommend the book, both as art and as a historic record.
4 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Detroit Disassembled 13 janvier 2012
Par Rob McG - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
The clarity and uniqueness of the photos are superior to many other books that i have looked at.
Being from Detroit area and having respect for how our lives were created and the jobs necessary to be who we are; it allows for the full understanding and respect of all that Detroit has had and still has to offer.
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