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Applying Domain-Driven Design and Patterns: With Examples in C# and .NET Format Kindle


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Longueur : 576 pages Composition améliorée: Activé Langue : Anglais

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Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

Patterns, Domain-Driven Design (DDD), and Test-Driven Development (TDD) enable architects and developers to create systems that are powerful, robust, and maintainable. Now, there’s a comprehensive, practical guide to leveraging all these techniques primarily in Microsoft .NET environments, but the discussions are just as useful for Java developers.

 

Drawing on seminal work by Martin Fowler (Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture) and Eric Evans (Domain-Driven Design), Jimmy Nilsson shows how to create real-world architectures for any .NET application. Nilsson illuminates each principle with clear, well-annotated code examples based on C# 1.1 and 2.0. His examples and discussions will be valuable both to C# developers and those working with other .NET languages and any databases–even with other platforms, such as J2EE. Coverage includes

 

·        Quick primers on patterns, TDD, and refactoring

·        Using architectural techniques to improve software quality

·        Using domain models to support business rules and validation

·        Applying enterprise patterns to provide persistence support via NHibernate

·        Planning effectively for the presentation layer and UI testing

·        Designing for Dependency Injection, Aspect Orientation, and other new paradigms

Quatrième de couverture

“[This] is a book about design in the .NET world, driven in an agile manner and infused with the products of the enterprise patterns community. [It] shows you how to begin applying such things as TDD, object relational mapping, and DDD to .NET projects...techniques that many developers think are the key to future software development.... As the technology gets more capable and sophisticated, it becomes more important to understand how to use it well. This book is a valuable step toward advancing that understanding.”

–Martin Fowler, author of Refactoring andPatterns of Enterprise Application Architecture

 

Patterns, Domain-Driven Design (DDD), and Test-Driven Development (TDD) enable architects and developers to create systems that are powerful, robust, and maintainable. Now, there’s a comprehensive, practical guide to leveraging all these techniques primarily in Microsoft .NET environments, but the discussions are just as useful for Java developers.

 

Drawing on seminal work by Martin Fowler (Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture) and Eric Evans (Domain-Driven Design), Jimmy Nilsson shows how to create real-world architectures for any .NET application. Nilsson illuminates each principle with clear, well-annotated code examples based on C# 1.1 and 2.0. His examples and discussions will be valuable both to C# developers and those working with other .NET languages and any databases–even with other platforms, such as J2EE. Coverage includes

 

·        Quick primers on patterns, TDD, and refactoring

·        Using architectural techniques to improve software quality

·        Using domain models to support business rules and validation

·        Applying enterprise patterns to provide persistence support via NHibernate

·        Planning effectively for the presentation layer and UI testing

·        Designing for Dependency Injection, Aspect Orientation, and other new paradigms

 


Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 3884 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 576 pages
  • Utilisation simultanée de l'appareil : Jusqu'à 5 appareils simultanés, selon les limites de l'éditeur
  • Editeur : Addison-Wesley Professional; Édition : 1 (8 mai 2006)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B0054KOKQQ
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
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  • Word Wise: Non activé
  • Composition améliorée: Activé
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x955878b8) étoiles sur 5 24 commentaires
44 internautes sur 46 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x9557d24c) étoiles sur 5 Unifying Tome for Domain Driven Design and Implementation with .NET 9 août 2006
Par Thomas Beck - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
I was surprised that this book slipped under my radar for almost 3 months. I've been on the lookout for just such a unifying tome of knowledge that relates patterns and domain-driven design (DDD) to a practical .NET example for quite some while. The book delivers well on its promises, significantly surpassing the only other real competitor, Foundations of Object-Oriented Programming Using .NET 2.0 Patterns. The pros and cons, as I see them, are outlined below:

PROS

* Combines the ideas of Domain Driven Design (Evans) with Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture (Fowler). These books are pretty much mandatory reading prior to diving into this book.

* Draws upon a myriad of other well-known sources, including materials from Refactoring to Patterns and the GoF, work from Johnson and Lowy, as well as a rare reference to Naked Objects. The more experienced and better read you are, the more this stuff will make sense.

* Rare .NET coverage of advanced concepts like Plain Old CLR Objects (POCOs), persistence ignorant (PI) objects, O/R mapping with NHibernate, Dependency Injection, Inversion of Control, and Aspect-Oriented Programming.

CONS

* While some sections are really insightful and could contain more interesting materials, other sections seem to drone on too long. The work on defining the NUnit tests, in particular, flows like a stream of consciousness and doesn't really add a lot of structured value to understanding DDD, patters, or TDD for that matter.

* Embedded comments in the text adopt from the style used in Framework Design Guidelines. It worked very well for Cwalina / Abrams in their book because it seemed planned in from the outset. Comments like "one reviewer commented on the code with the following, more succinct version" seem like editorial comments left in and not collaborative authoring by design.

All-in-all a very solid book that fills a unique market niche, leaving it pretty much without peers. If Amazon had a 4.5 starts rating, Applying DDD would get it. As a secondary reference book, it doesn't offer the earth shattering insights of some of the innovative source materials found in the Fowler Signature Series, for example. It does, however, weave together an interesting example of how to tie all of these concepts together for the .NET architect looking to take their understanding to the next level.
23 internautes sur 26 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x95ff1780) étoiles sur 5 "Down to Earth" DDD with "real-world" examples. 5 juin 2006
Par Murat Uysal - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
I was expecting this book for a looong time. For those who are new to DDD and want to be a good practitioner, I think this is a must read. The reason is not only that there are not many books in this topic (check out Eric Evan's DDD book if you haven't done so) but also there are not many "down-to-earth" books available. In this book you will find many "real world" examples where the author discusses the pros and cons. I like the books that discuss the trade-offs instead of the ones that try to give `universal" answers; as "it depends" is usually the answer to most of the questions in software development.

Apart from DDD, if you are also new to TDD, PEAA (Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture by Martin Fowler, another great book), O/RM (NHibernate to be specific), Mocking frameworks (NMock to be specific), SOA, AOP etc you will find introductory level information in the book which is just enough to get started. With this book the link between the PEAA and DDD is clearer than ever. It does a great job on how to use PEAA and DDD in a complementary way.

I should also mention the format of the book; it is easy to read and grasp. No need to mention that the idea of having guest authors for specific topics is just great. And also as readers we might be subject to a new trend; having "product placements" in the book :) Some Swedish brands made it to the book as the author being a Swedish guy, which I think totally fair :)

I want to thank Jimmy and all the coauthors for this great work.
7 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x954c6ed0) étoiles sur 5 Waste of time, waste of money 17 décembre 2011
Par Konrad Garus - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
The reviewer saying it sounds like a tired colleague's random ramblings is spot on. It's very hard to read, and not because the matter is difficult, but because it's terribly written. Fowler's and Evans' books are masterpieces. Very clean, focused, inspiring and readable. This one is nothing like that. A bit of TDD, a bit of NHibernate, but little concrete core.

What's worse, very often I find myself in complete disagreement with how the author is using various techniques. It hurt to read some of the TDD pieces, and it seems the author is yet to discover SOLID. Eventually the domain model looks like a complex, tangled ball of mud, not a consistent, elegant piece of art I expected.
24 internautes sur 31 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x9570f774) étoiles sur 5 Not for beginners 8 mai 2007
Par joe leonard - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
At the start the author says that this book is for "a wide target audience" and that if you don't have some knowledge of "object-orientation and C#" interest and enthusiasm will compensate for any lack of prior knowledge. I've been a web dev for over 10 years and know more than something about object-orientation etc. but this book is NOT for a beginner or even an intermediate programmer. On page 4 he starts discussion something called "case focus" with no definition and moves right into Domain-Driven Design Focus, again without explaining what this means. I found the book quite full of jargon and buzz words with a large presumption that one has already had experience in these topics. He says he is trying to build a bridge between users and developers. Most users will glaze over after the first chapter without any clue as to what he is talking about. If you are an advanced object-oriented programmer familiar with UML and other design technologies then this might be the book for you. Sorry. But a book this complex is not a bridge between users and developers.
4 internautes sur 4 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x9733e1b0) étoiles sur 5 When it was published, this was THE $%#@ 8 juin 2010
Par David W. Martines - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
Having read POEAA and DDD, I wondered where to go next, how to put it all together. Apparently the author was thinking the same thing. This book helped clear up a lot of the concepts that the previously mentioned classics introduced. The book is a joy to read and the author's tone is very humble and informal. Following along with the author's thought/design process, I feel I really learned a lot. I'm still not sure about the "rules" stuff, but the the treatment of aggregates is brilliant. However, the book sort of runs out of steam as it gets way too into the infrastructure and persistence concerns. At the time, I had never used NHibernate although I wanted to - so I really ate up the goodies here. But looking at it now, with new versions of NHibernate and Entity Framework, etc., this section seems sort of out of place. Might have been a good web-delivered supplement. (BTW - I would have paid extra for the actual code to NWorkspace!) The appendices are great, and I actually keep coming back to them - the sections on SOA, IOC and AOP were extremely enlightening for me. BUT - I'm not sure how well this stuff will stand the test of time. It is/was very timely material. Not to give a bad review though - I heartily recommend this to anyone doing DDD in .NET
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