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Bad Boy: An Inspector Banks Novel [Format Kindle]

Peter Robinson
3.2 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (5 commentaires client)

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By the end of August, the waterlogged Yorkshire countryside was a symphony of green and gold under a blue sky scribbled with white clouds. Heaven only knew how the farmers had managed to mow and bale the hay, as the rain seemed to have fallen for days without end, but somehow they had succeeded, and their neat straw cylinders dotted the fields. Bright tractors ploughed in the stubble and turned the earth a dark, fecund brown. Smells of the recent harvest and of the coming autumn chill mingled in the mild air. On the moors, the purple heather was in bloom. By the roadside, swallows gathered on the telephone wires preparing for their long flight to South Africa.
Annie Cabbot wished she could go with them as she drove the last few miles to work that Monday morning. A few days on a game reserve would do her the world of good, photographing and sketching giraffes, zebras, leopards, lions and elephants. Then perhaps a tour of the Winelands, a taste of fine Cape Town cuisine and nightlife.
But it was not to be. She had exhausted her entire holiday allowance for the year, apart from a few days that she planned to use to create occasional long weekends between now and Christmas. Besides, she couldn’t afford to go to South Africa; she would be hard pushed to pay for a mini-break in Blackpool. Lucky swallows.
The traffic came to a halt about half a mile from the big roundabout on the southern edge of Eastvale, and when Annie finally got close enough to see the fender-bender that was causing the delay, she was already late for work. A patrol car had arrived at the accident scene, so she felt she could safely leave the uniformed officers to deal with the obvious case of road rage between the two drivers, who were standing by their cars shouting at each other, fists raised. Traffic wasn’t her department.
Annie made her way through the increasingly built-up and busy streets around the college, where a few late summer students strolled across the green to morning lectures, rucksacks slung over their shoulders. From there, she cut down a long narrow street of three-storey redbrick Victorian houses, mostly converted into student flats, over to Market Street. When she reached the market square, she took the narrow lane between the buildings and parked at the back of the Tudor-fronted police station. She said hello to a couple of officers she recognized standing outside sneaking a quick smoke break, then swiped her card in the slot on the back door and entered Western Area Headquarters.
A couple of people greeted her when she walked into the Major Crimes squad room. Geraldine Masterson, their new probationary detective constable, told her that Winsome Jackman and Doug Wilson – known to most of his colleagues as “Harry Potter” due to his uncanny resemblance to Daniel Radcliffe – were already out interviewing witnesses to last night’s hit and run on the Lyndgarth Road. The incident had left two teenagers in hospital and one no doubt very shaken driver holed up at home, just waiting for the knock on the door, wishing he hadn’t had that one last drink for the road.
Annie had hardly made a dent in the accumulated paperwork when her phone rang. She put down her pen and picked up the handset. “DI Cabbot.”
It was the desk sergeant. “Someone to see DCI Banks,” he said. “A Mrs. Doyle.” There was a moment’s pause while the sergeant appeared to be conferring with the visitor, their voices muffled. “Mrs. Juliet Doyle,” he went on. “She says she knows the DCI. Says it’s urgent.”
Annie sighed. “All right. Send her up. Might as well have someone show her to DCI Banks’s office. It’s a bit more private there.”
“Will do, ma’am.”
Annie closed the thick folder of crime statistics on her desk and walked down the corridor to Banks’s office. The few occasions she had been in there recently had unnerved her even more than her brief visits to his cottage to water the plants, take in any parcels and flyers and make sure all was well. Banks’s absence seemed even more palpable in the cool silence and the slight musty smell of his office. His desk was empty except for the computer, which hadn’t been switched on in ages. A CD player/radio combination stood silently on one of his bookshelves next to a couple of tattered Kingsley Amis paperbacks he’d picked up from the second-hand bookshop in the market square a few days before he left. Annie moved the computer monitor aside so that she would have an unobstructed view of the person sitting opposite her. A young PC knocked at the door and showed the woman in.
“I thought this was Alan’s office,” Juliet Doyle said. “It has his name on the door. Who are you? I don’t mean to seem rude, but I specifically asked to see Alan.”
She seemed nervous, Annie thought, her movements jerky and birdlike as she took in the sparse room. “DCI Banks is on holiday,” Annie explained, standing up and extending her hand. “I’m DI Annie Cabbot. Can I help you?”
“I . . . I don’t know. I was expecting Alan. This is all so . . .” Juliet fingered the chain around her neck. A heavy gold and jade pendant hung from it in the lightly freckled cleft between her breasts. She was probably in her mid-forties, Annie guessed, smartly dressed, her clothes definitely not from any of the shops you would find in the Swainsdale Centre, more likely Harrogate or York, wavy blond hair with dark brown roots, tasteful makeup, still attractive, and not concerned about showing a little cleavage. Her skirt was a modest knee-length, legs nicely tapered beneath it, and she wore a tan suede jacket in an elegant hourglass cut. Annie wondered if she fancied Banks, if there had been something between them.
“Please sit down,” Annie said. After a slight hesitation, Juliet perched at the edge of the chair opposite her. “Is it anything I can help you with, or was it something personal?”
“That’s why I was hoping to see Alan,” Juliet went on. “You see, it’s both, really. Oh, this is so difficult. When will he be back?”
“Not until next week, I’m afraid.”
Juliet Doyle seemed to consider this for a few moments, still fidgeting with her chain, as if debating whether the matter could wait that long.
 “Would you like some tea? Coffee?” Annie asked.
“No, thank you.”
“I can’t help you if I don’t know what it’s about,” Annie went on. “You say it’s both police business and personal, is that right?”
Juliet nodded. “That’s why it’s so hard. I mean, Alan would understand.” She had shifted her attentions from the necklace to the chunky diamond ring on the third finger of her left hand, twisting it around and around. Her fingernails were bitten low and painted pink.
“Why don’t you try me?” Annie said. “Just tell me what the problem is.”
“Alan would know what to do.
Annie leaned back in the chair and linked her hands behind her head. She felt as if she was in for a long haul. “Perhaps you could start by telling me exactly what your relationship is with DCI Banks?”
Juliet appeared startled. “Relationship? We don’t have a relationship.”
“I simply meant how you came to know one another.”
“Oh, that. I see. Yes. I’m sorry. We’re neighbours. Were.”
Annie happened to know that Banks had no neighbours anywhere close to his Gratly cottage, so she assumed that Juliet Doyle was referring to the past, perhaps when he had lived on Laburnum Way, about a mile down Market Street from the police station. But Banks hadn’t lived there for ten years. Had they kept in touch all that time? Was there something she was missing? “When was this?” she asked.
“When he and Sandra were still together. I still think it’s so tragic that they parted like that, don’t you? Such a lovely couple.”
“Yes,” said Annie, whose only experiences of Sandra had been humiliating and more than a little frightening.
“Anyway,” Juliet went on. “We were friends and neighbours. That’s why I thought he might be able to help me.”
“Mrs. Doyle,” said Annie, “if this is a police matter, you really should tell me. Are you in some sort of trouble?”
Juliet flinched as if she’d been tapped on the shoulder by surprise. “Trouble? Me? No. Of course not.”
“Then what is it?”
Juliet scanned the office as if she suspected Banks was hiding behind a filing cabinet or in a cupboard. “Are you sure Alan’s not here?”
“Positive. I told you. He’s on his holidays.”
Juliet twisted her diamond ring again and let the silence stretch. Just when Annie was about to get up and show her the door, she blurted out, “It’s about Erin.”
“Yes. Our daughter. Me and my husband, that is. Patrick. He sent me. He’s stopping home with Erin.”
“Is Erin in trouble?”
“I suppose she is. Yes. You don’t know what they get up to, do you? Do you have any children?”
“Well, you wouldn’t know, then. It’s too easy to blame the parents, the way they do in the papers and on television. But when you just do...

Revue de presse

“A top-notch thriller that further advances Banks’ development as one of the most intriguing characters in detective fiction….With emotional literacy and inexorable momentum that builds tension to the breaking point, Robinson reaffirms his place in the top cadre of police-procedural writers.” (Richmond Times-Dispatch on Bad Boy)

“Another outstanding crime novel from Robinson.” (Booklist (starred review) on Bad Boy)

“(A) strong entry in a superb series.” (Publishers Weekly (starred review) on Bad Boy)

“Entertaining.” (Kirkus Reviews on Bad Boy)

“Excellent characterization and skillful plotting make this an engrossing read.” (Library Journal on Bad Boy)

“Bad Boy is very, very good indeed.” (Strand magazine on Bad Boy)

“Robinson once again achieves the high bar he’s set in all his previous Inspector Banks books: gut-wrenching plotting alongside heart-wrenching portraits of the characters who populate his world, not to mention the top-notch police procedure. This one will stay with you for a long time.” (Jeffery Deaver, New York Times bestselling author of Roadside Crosses)

“A murderous psychopath presents Alan Banks with the most intensely personal challenge of the maverick detective’s storied career. Superbly cinematic from the beginning to the explosive finale, this would be a thrilling movie.” (Joseph Wambaugh, New York Times bestselling author of Hollywood Moon)

“You’d better buy.” (Library Journal on Bad Boy)

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3.2 étoiles sur 5
3.2 étoiles sur 5
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1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Format:Format Kindle
"Bad Boy" est le 16ème (et pour l'instant dernier) roman de la saga (assez inégale) des "Alan BANKS" écrite par Peter ROBINSON.

Dès le début du roman, on entre dans le vif du sujet. Juliet DOYLE, une ancienne voisine d'Alan BANKS, vient le voir au commissariat. BANKS étant en vacances, c'est sa collègue (et ancienne amie très proche) Annie CABBOT qui va la recevoir, ce qui ne va pas être sans conséquences. Après des hésitations, Juliet accepte de confier son problème.

Sa fille Erin, qui n'habite plus chez ses parents, est revenue provisoirement chez eux sans donner la moindre explication. Alors qu'elle faisait le ménage, Juliet a trouvé dans la chambre d'Erin un pistolet. Déboussolée et inquiète, elle a décidé de venir en parler à son ami BANKS pour qu'il la conseille. BANKS étant absent, c'est toute la procédure normale de recherche de l'arme à feu qui va être entreprise.

Au cours de cette enquête, les choses vont aller s'accélérant. Erin habite avec deux colocataires dont Tracy qui n'est autre que la fille de BANKS mais qui ne tient pas à le révéler et se fait même appeler Francesca. Cette enquête inquiète le petit copain d'Erin, Jaff, plutôt joli garçon, charmeur, mais dont la véritable nature est plus que dangereuse. En effet, le pistolet retrouvé a été dérobé par Erin à Jaff et a servi à tuer. Tracy, attirée par Jaff, lui propose une planque de quelques jours dans la maison de son père.
Lire la suite ›
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9 internautes sur 11 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
2.0 étoiles sur 5 déception pour une fan d'Alan Banks 23 février 2011
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Suite à ma lecture en version originale (en anglais), mon commentaire se veut une mise en garde pour les fans de Peter ROBINSON et son formidable inspecteur BANKS qui m'a déçue dans ce dernier opus pour les raisons suivantes :

- intrigue assez maigre qui met en scène la fille de Banks, Tracy, qui se comporte en adolescente paumée et capricieuse (à 25 ans passés) et qui a succombé au charme d'un "mauvais garçon" aussi beau que cynique et dangereux

- Banks est en vacances au début et n'apparaît (en sauveur évidemment !) qu'au tiers du récit après une aventure amoureuse qui nous est relatée de façon plutôt superficielle

- une action molle et peu de réflexions, peu d'introspection, peu de tous ces tourments et pensées intimes dont on s'était épris

- un style de "hall de gare" avec énormément de dialogues, donc forcément simplificateur

L'histoire commence avec un fait divers qui tourne au drame suite à un enchaînement de mauvaises initiatives, c'est un peu frustrant car les faits ne nécessitent pas la finesse d'investigation nourrie de moult cogitation à laquelle ce talentueux écrivain nous avait habitués.

Il ne reste plus qu'à attendre que l'auteur se reprenne dans la prochaine "livraison" de la carrière de BANKS, et d'ici là ne pas hésiter à se replonger dans tous les titres précédents, tous de bien meilleure facture que celui-ci.
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1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 excellent 4 mai 2012
Par MM
Format:Poche|Achat vérifié
un des meilleurs de Robinson! L'évolution de chacun des personnages est captivante. La construction de récit, comme toujours, comporte de nombreux rebondissements et crée un fort suspense.
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3.0 étoiles sur 5 Le moins bon des Banks (et j'ai tout lu) 29 mai 2014
Format:Poche|Achat vérifié
Un tiers de livre à effacer. Le suivi de la fille de Banks m'a ennuyée... Le rythme du livre y perd. Connaître des solutions avant le DI est à éviter (à mon sens). Heureusement dès que Banks entre en scène (y compris ses vacances) le mouvement s'accélère. Mais cet écart est pardonné car tout le reste de la série m'a rendue fan. à mon palmares Banks est encore deuxième ex aequo.
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4.0 étoiles sur 5 Bon livre 29 juillet 2013
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
Beaucoup de plaisir à lire ce livre . Intrigue bien menée,personnages intéressants . Mais pourquoi les héros agissent ils en cow boys solitaires sans respect des règles?
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