undrgrnd Cliquez ici NEWNEEEW nav-sa-clothing-shoes nav-sa-clothing-shoes Cloud Drive Photos cliquez_ici Rentrée scolaire Cliquez ici Acheter Fire Shop Kindle Paperwhite cliquez_ici Jeux Vidéo Bijoux Montres Montres boutique Tendance
Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother et plus d'un million d'autres livres sont disponibles pour le Kindle d'Amazon. En savoir plus
Acheter d'occasion
EUR 0,01
+ EUR 2,99 (livraison)
D'occasion: Très bon | Détails
Vendu par BetterWorldBooksFr
État: D'occasion: Très bon
Commentaire: Expedié du Royaume-Uni. Ancien livre de bibliothèque. Condition très bonne pour un livre d'occasion. Usure minime. Sous garantie de remboursement complet. Votre achat aide a lutter contre l'analphabetisme dans le monde.
Vous l'avez déjà ?
Repliez vers l'arrière Repliez vers l'avant
Ecoutez Lecture en cours... Interrompu   Vous écoutez un extrait de l'édition audio Audible
En savoir plus
Voir cette image

Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother (Anglais) Relié – 10 janvier 2011

7 commentaires client

Voir les formats et éditions Masquer les autres formats et éditions
Prix Amazon
Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle
"Veuillez réessayer"
Relié, 10 janvier 2011
EUR 9,51 EUR 0,01
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 65,57 EUR 57,46
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 45,40 EUR 41,32
"Veuillez réessayer"
--Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Poche.

Livres anglais et étrangers
Lisez en version originale. Cliquez ici

Descriptions du produit


This is a story about a mother, two daughters, and two dogs. It's also about Mozart and Mendelssohn, the piano and the violin, and how we made it to Carnegie Hall.

This was supposed to be a story of how Chinese parents are better at raising kids than Western ones.

But instead, it's about a bitter clash of cultures, a fleeting taste of glory, and how

I was humbled by a thirteen-year-old.

Part One

The Tiger, the living symbol of strength and power, generally inspires fear and respect.

The Chinese Mother

A lot of people wonder how Chinese parents raise such stereotypically successful kids. They wonder what these parents do to produce so many math whizzes and music prodigies, what it's like inside the family, and whether they could do it too. Well, I can tell them, because I've done it. Here are some things my daughters, Sophia and Louisa, were never allowed to do:

  • attend a sleepover

  • have a playdate

  • be in a school play

  • complain about not being in a school play

  • watch TV or play computer games

  • choose their own extracurricular activities

  • get any grade less than an A

  • not be the #1 student in every subject except gym and drama

  • play any instrument other than the piano or violin

  • not play the piano or violin.

I'm using the term "Chinese mother" loosely. I recently met a super-successful white guy from South Dakota (you've seen him on television), and after comparing notes we decided that his working-class father had definitely been a Chinese mother. I know some Korean, Indian, Jamaican, Irish, and Ghanaian parents who qualify too. Conversely, I know some mothers of Chinese heritage, almost always born in the West, who are not Chinese mothers, by choice or otherwise.

I'm also using the term "Western parents" loosely. Western parents come in all varieties. In fact, I'll go out on a limb and say that Westerners are far more diverse in their parenting styles than the Chinese. Some Western parents are strict; others are lax. There are same-sex parents, Orthodox Jewish parents, single parents, ex-hippie parents, investment banker parents, and military parents. None of these "Western" parents necessarily see eye to eye, so when I use the term "Western parents," of course I'm not referring to all Western parents—just as "Chinese mother" doesn't refer to all Chinese mothers.

All the same, even when Western parents think they're being strict, they usually don't come close to being Chinese mothers. For example, my Western friends who consider themselves strict make their children practice their instruments thirty minutes every day. An hour at most. For a Chinese mother, the first hour is the easy part. It's hours two and three that get tough.

Despite our squeamishness about cultural stereotypes, there are tons of studies out there showing marked and quantifiable differences between Chinese and Westerners when it comes to parenting. In one study of 50 Western American mothers and 48 Chinese immigrant mothers, almost 70% of the Western mothers said either that "stressing academic success is not good for children" or that "parents need to foster the idea that learning is fun." By contrast, roughly 0% of the Chinese mothers felt the same way. Instead, the vast majority of the Chinese mothers said that they believe their children can be "the best" students, that "academic achievement reflects successful parenting," and that if children did not excel at school then there was "a problem" and parents "were not doing their job." Other studies indicate that compared to Western parents, Chinese parents spend approximately ten times as long every day drilling academic activities with their children. By contrast, Western kids are more likely to participate in sports teams.

This brings me to my final point. Some might think that the American sports parent is an analog to the Chinese mother. This is so wrong. Unlike your typical Western over-scheduling soccer mom, the Chinese mother believes that (1) schoolwork always comes first; (2) an A-minus is a bad grade; (3) your children must be two years ahead of their classmates in math; (4) you must never compliment your children in public; (5) if your child ever disagrees with a teacher or coach, you must always take the side of the teacher or coach; (6) the only activities your children should be permitted to do are those in which they can eventually win a medal; and (7) that medal must be gold.

--Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Poche .

Revue de presse

"Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother is the book we've all been waiting for - a candid, provocative, poignant and vicarious journey through the Chinese- American family culture. It will leave you breathless with its bluntness and emotion. Amy Chua is a Tiger Mother, a greatly gifted law professor and, ultimately, an honest, loving woman with a lot to say."
-Tom Brokaw

"This is one outrageous book, partly thanks to Amy Chua's writing style - Chua is pugnacious and blunt, with an unerring nose for the absurd ...The cultural divide Chua so brilliantly captures is one we stand to witness more and more in our globalized age, after all; and what with Asia and Asian achievement looming ever larger in the American imagination, the issues inherent in Battle Hymn are as important as they are entertaining... I was riveted by this book"
-Gish Jen, The Boston Globe

"Amy Chua's Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother did more than speak to me. It screamed, shouted and lectured me. It made me simultaneously laugh with empathy and cringe with embarrassment and exasperation... Charming... Self-effacing... Guffaw-inducing"
-Terry Hong, San Francisco Chronicle

"Readers will alternately gasp at and empathize with Chua's struggles and aspirations, all the while enjoying her writing, which, like her kid-rearing philosophy, is brisk, lively and no-holds-barred. This memoir raises intriguing, sometimes uncomfortable questions about love, pride, ambition, achievement and self-worth that will resonate among success-obsessed parents... Engagingly and provocatively chronicled. Readers of all stripes will respond to [Battle Hymn of the] Tiger Mother.
-Elizabeth Chang, The Washington Post

"[Chua's] writing is smart and lively"
-Entertainment Weekly

"Chua's mindset and methods-bolstered by faith in Chinese family tradition-pose a useful challenge for an era haunted by a helicoptering ethos as hard to shake as it is to like. Here is an alternative to the queasy hypocrisy of typical hyperparents, buffeted by shifting expertise that leaves them anxious about overpressuring even as they push. Chua breaks through all that. She is a crusader invigorated by practicing what she preaches: the arduous work she believes necessary to do anything well, child-rearing included... But precisely because Chua slaves away as hard as her girls do, one thing her program is not is guilt-inducing. In the end, her ordeal with Lulu teaches Chua humility and proves her daughter's very healthy autonomy-and inspires next to no regrets."
-Slate.com --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Poche .

Aucun appareil Kindle n'est requis. Téléchargez l'une des applis Kindle gratuites et commencez à lire les livres Kindle sur votre smartphone, tablette ou ordinateur.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

Pour obtenir l'appli gratuite, saisissez votre adresse e-mail ou numéro de téléphone mobile.

Détails sur le produit

  • Relié: 256 pages
  • Editeur : Bloomsbury Publishing PLC; Édition : First Edition (10 janvier 2011)
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 1408812673
  • ISBN-13: 978-1408812679
  • Dimensions du produit: 15,3 x 2,3 x 23,4 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 3.7 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (7 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 453.294 en Livres anglais et étrangers (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres anglais et étrangers)
  •  Souhaitez-vous compléter ou améliorer les informations sur ce produit ? Ou faire modifier les images?

En savoir plus sur l'auteur

Découvrez des livres, informez-vous sur les écrivains, lisez des blogs d'auteurs et bien plus encore.

Dans ce livre

(En savoir plus)
Parcourir et rechercher une autre édition de ce livre.
Parcourir les pages échantillon
Couverture | Copyright | Table des matières | Extrait | Quatrième de couverture
Rechercher dans ce livre:

Quels sont les autres articles que les clients achètent après avoir regardé cet article?

Commentaires en ligne

3.7 étoiles sur 5
Partagez votre opinion avec les autres clients

Commentaires client les plus utiles

3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par Cyril le 25 mars 2011
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Il est impossible de résumer ce livre sans le spoiler ; toutes les personnes choquées par ce qu'elles ont vu dans la presse à propos d'Amy Chua devraient le lire. Il est impossible par la suite qu'elles ne changent pas un tout petit peu d'avis.
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par Bowen le 17 août 2013
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Ceux qui se plaignent de n'avoir lu aucune méthode éducative à la chinoise, l'auteur vous avait prévenu!! Ce livre décrit juste le quotidien d'une mère et ses filles en quête d'excellence. Adroit dans la forme, très belle plume americano-chinoise ;)
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Par Lectrice passionnée ! le 27 août 2015
Format: Broché
Un ouvrage fort intéressant, et un essai qui a le mérite d'endosser un vrai parti pris. Amy Chua traite des bienfaits de l'éducation traditionnelle "à la chinoise" dans une Amérique façonnée par les droits de l'homme, la liberté individuelle, la philosophie des Lumières et la psychologie du développement. Frictions en perspective ! Partant de sa propre expérience et de l'éducation de ses deux filles, le propos nous laisse songeurs (rêveurs ?) quant à la puissance du travail, de la rigueur et de la persévérance. L'auteur a malgré tout l'élégance d'être honnête sur les limites de sa méthode, et la fin de l'ouvrage pourrait bien en surprendre plus d'un...
Le style est simple et facile, même pour quelqu'un dont l'anglais ne serait pas la langue maternelle.
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
J'ai acheté ce livre suite à la polémique qui a entouré Amy Chua lors de sa publication ("mauvaise mère", "mère tyran"...) A la fin du livre, on la comprend mieux. Elle raconte sa vie de famille et l'éduction de ses deux filles. On se pose avec elles des questions sur l'éducation, le respect des parents, le caractère des enfants, l'épanouissement personnel. Une bonne lecture, assez rapide, mais agréable et pertinente.
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer


Souhaitez-vous compléter ou améliorer les informations sur ce produit ? Ou faire modifier les images?