Commencez à lire Big Little Man: In Search of My Asian Self sur votre Kindle dans moins d'une minute. Vous n'avez pas encore de Kindle ? Achetez-le ici Ou commencez à lire dès maintenant avec l'une de nos applications de lecture Kindle gratuites.

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

 
 
 

Essai gratuit

Découvrez gratuitement un extrait de ce titre

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Big Little Man: In Search of My Asian Self
 
Agrandissez cette image
 

Big Little Man: In Search of My Asian Self [Format Kindle]

Alex Tizon

Prix conseillé : EUR 21,09 De quoi s'agit-il ?
Prix éditeur - format imprimé : EUR 24,67
Prix Kindle : EUR 11,99 TTC & envoi gratuit via réseau sans fil par Amazon Whispernet
Économisez : EUR 12,68 (51%)

App de lecture Kindle gratuite Tout le monde peut lire les livres Kindle, même sans un appareil Kindle, grâce à l'appli Kindle GRATUITE pour les smartphones, les tablettes et les ordinateurs.

Pour obtenir l'appli gratuite, saisissez votre adresse e-mail ou numéro de téléphone mobile.

Formats

Prix Amazon Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle EUR 11,99  
Relié EUR 24,67  




Descriptions du produit

Revue de presse

"In Big Little Man Alex Tizon fearlessly penetrates the core of not just what it means to be male and Asian in America, but what it means to be human anywhere."-Cheryl Strayed, author of Wild

 "Part candid memoir, part incisive cultural study, Big Little Man addresses - and explodes - the stereotypes of Asian manhood. Alex Tizon writes with acumen and courage, and the result is a book at once illuminating and, yes, liberating." -Peter Ho Davies, author of The Welsh Girl


"In Big Little Man Alex Tizon fearlessly penetrates the core of not just what it means to be male and Asian in America, but what it means to be human anywhere."-Cheryl Strayed, author of Wild

"Part candid memoir, part incisive cultural study, Big Little Man addresses - and explodes - the stereotypes of Asian manhood. Alex Tizon writes with acumen and courage, and the result is a book at once illuminating and, yes, liberating." -Peter Ho Davies, author of The Welsh Girl


"Part candid memoir, part incisive cultural study, Big Little Man addresses - and explodes - the stereotypes of Asian manhood. Alex Tizon writes with acumen and courage, and the result is a book at once illuminating and, yes, liberating." -Peter Ho Davies

"In Big Little Man Alex Tizon fearlessly penetrates the core of not just what it means to be male and Asian in America, but what it means to be human anywhere."-Cheryl Strayed, author of Wild

"Part candid memoir, part incisive cultural study, Big Little Man addresses - and explodes - the stereotypes of Asian manhood. Alex Tizon writes with acumen and courage, and the result is a book at once illuminating and, yes, liberating." -Peter Ho Davies, author of The Welsh Girl "A well-paced, engaging combo of history, memoir, and social analysis. . . Tizon’s skill as a feature reporter serves the book well, producing a narrative that moves fluidly between subjects, settings, and gazes." -- Publishers Weekly “A deft, illuminating memoir and cultural history.” -- Kirkus Reviews "Written compellingly....eye-opening... deeply felt, extensively researched." -- Booklist "Tizon’s candid journey into the shifting and multiplying definitions of manliness and the masculine ideal is revelatory and sobering."-- Library Journal “Highly readable . . . This personal narrative of self-education and growth will engage any reader captivated by the sources of American, and Asian-American, manhood — its multitude of inheritances and prospects.” – Minneapolis Star Tribune

“At once a ruthlessly honest personal story and a devastating critique of contemporary American culture . . . What makes [Tizon’s] writing compelling is his ability to investigate and explain complex topics, deftly weaving in information from websites, history texts, university research and social media, combined with intense self-examination. His willingness to look inward gives him more authority to unpack some of the damaging misperceptions about Asian men.”  -- Seattle Times

 


2011 J. Anthony Lukas Work-in-Progress Award for BIG LITTLE MAN

 

2009-2010 Knight International Journalism Fellowship

 

1997 Pulitzer Prize in investigative reporting

Présentation de l'éditeur

An award-winning writer takes a groundbreaking look at the experience and psyche of the Asian American male.

   Alex Tizon landed in an America that saw Asian women as sexy and Asian men as sexless. Immigrating from the Philippines as a young boy, everything he saw and heard taught him to be ashamed of his face, his skin color, his height.

 His fierce and funny observations of sex and the Asian American male include his own quest for love during college in the 1980s, a tortured tutorial on stereotypes that still make it hard for Asian men to get the girl. Tizon writes: "I had to educate myself on my own worth. It was a sloppy, piecemeal education, but I had to do it because no one else was going to do it for me."

 And then, a transformation. First, Tizon’s growing understanding that shame is universal: that his own just happened to be about race. Next, seismic cultural changes – from Jerry Yang’s phenomenal success with Yahoo! Inc., to actor Ken Watanabe’s emergence in Hollywood blockbusters, to Jeremy Lin’s meteoric NBA rise.  Finally, Tizon’s deeply original, taboo-bending investigation turns outward, tracking the unheard stories of young Asian men today, in a landscape still complex but much changed for the Asian American man. 

Détails sur le produit


En savoir plus sur l'auteur

Découvrez des livres, informez-vous sur les écrivains, lisez des blogs d'auteurs et bien plus encore.

Commentaires en ligne

Il n'y a pas encore de commentaires clients sur Amazon.fr
5 étoiles
4 étoiles
3 étoiles
2 étoiles
1 étoiles
Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 étoiles sur 5  51 commentaires
6 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 An Accurate and Heart-Breaking View of the Asian American Male in the U.S. of A 15 août 2014
Par Amazon Customer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
Tizon offers an intimate view into the mind of an Asian American male growing up in the early 1970s in America, along with the media stereotypes that had a profound effect on how he eventually views the world. I grew up in the 1980s with many of the same views Tizon had, that of the asexual, nerdy, martial arts, and small penis Asian man. A lot of people think that stereotypes are just stereotypes and that as long as we stop believing in them, we will transcend them. What Tizon conveys is that stereotypes affect everyone equally, including us Asian American males growing up in the States.

The general absence of a positive Asian American male role model during this time say as much as the constant bombardment of the media's portrayal of negative Asian male traits: If we do not see something, we tend to believe they really do not exist. Perception is often reality. In other words, because the general public often did not see Asian American males portrayed as lovers and leading men, they tend to only believe in the negative stereotypes of Asian American men and this certainly clouds their judgment and influences their interactions with us. Tizon bravely asserts what most of us already know but are ashamed to accept: We are the bottom of the barrel in the dating market.

I was actually routing for Tizon, hoping that he eventually reaches an ah-ha moment and is able to transcend his own demons. Alas, he still lets many of his past demons taut and torment him, even at the end of the book. It's for this reason that I lowered the rating by one star. I was hoping that Tizon figures it out and is writing this book to help other Asian males transcend their own self-loathing, self-defeating, and self-limiting beliefs they too faced growing up. In this way, this book is more for people looking to lose their sorrows in a bottle of whiskey, hashing over what they are already aware of in their limiting beliefs than it is about the transcendence of those limiting beliefs.
6 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Powerful, impactful, raw 6 juillet 2014
Par Just Me - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié|Commentaire client Vine pour produit gratuit (De quoi s'agit-il?)
An open, honest, and engaging look at Tizon's experience growing up Asian in America. His pain comes through, and so does his largely successful quest to move through the pain to healing. This is both Tizon's story and the story of being an Asian male in America. As he puts it, "The truest story I could tell in relation to the grand themes of this book was my own. I do identify patterns and occasionally make statements that sweep broadly, but I don't speak for any other individual or group. I testify mainly to my own experience, in the hope that my words may resonate with others still looking for words."

One issue that Tizon touches on is the very different stereotypes for the sexuality of Asian women vs. Asian men, which has much to do with the impression some have of Asians in general. Tizon writes, "In online forums, posts like this one from a Chinese woman are not uncommon: 'All women like strong men. White men are stronger than Asian men.... White men are freer. They have batter lives. Asian men work too much and show too much respect for authority.'...Dating white men, on the other hand, 'means acceptance into American culture. White culture.'" You can see how this could have a powerful impact on an Asian American man.

I am pleased with how Tizon acknowledges that there are many reasons that people can feel disconnected, and that being an Asian male in America is only one of them. He writes, "I realize now how profoundly absorbed I was in my self loathing, so much so that I failed to see the other exiles around me who must have felt equally unseen. The overweight, the shy, the awkward. The non-English speakers, the weak, the slow-witted, the too-smart-for-their-own-good, the poor. The handicapped, the traumatized, the alienated, the self-exiled; philosophy majors, almost everyone in creative writing, the entire math department. We could have commiserated, formed a communion of the wretched and brought out the diamond in one another. But I did not make room for them in my psyche. They put too inconvenient a wrinkle in that smooth soft blanket of self-pity in which I had wrapped myself." This realization makes all the difference in this book. Such self-awareness brings this book from a wallow in pain, to a journey and is what makes this book have much to offer.

Part of Tizon's quest to self-respect involves looking at Asian history. If you don't know much Asian history, there is a great history lesson here for you, presented in a way that shows it's relevance.

Highly recommended for anyone interested in the experience of being an Asian American man.
7 internautes sur 8 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Better Than Even Expected 11 juillet 2014
Par Dawn Killen-Courtney - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
I am not Asian, not male, not a recent Immigrant, but decided to review this for just those reasons. I am interested in Asian culture, American Asian writers (Amy Tan, Lisa See, etc.). Also, I am interested in what the experience of Asian men has been in this country. I guess, to hear Alex Tizon tell it, I fall into a real minority to say that I have always thought Asian males are quite appealing. I never knew why, but now Alex Tizon has taught me about Wen Wu, and I realize that must have something to do with it, since the large, blustering, hairy wall of testosterone that is a Western ideal never really did much for my hormones.

But as Alex relates his difficult path, with its accompanying feelings of shame, hollowness, inadequacy and despair, he is also searching, with a very intense purpose, and takes us on a larger journey, which must of course have shaped his own, and that look at the Western geo-political expansion took on new meaning for me. He brings faces, stories names and pain to the faceless masses that have suffered greatly and continue to do so now in crowded regions with poor economies. He does a very good job bringing the whole of his life's journey into our awareness, in a way that it probably didn't even appear to him at the time he was living through it, but stitches it all together handily.

As Asians have risen in the world view in various pursuits, I can feel the sense of accomplishment theirs have to other Asians. I can only wish he would have given mention to the world class Asian musicians who are all transforming the world of classical music such as: Sarah Chang, Midori, and Anne Akiko Meyers among the violinists, YoYo Ma, cello, Wu Han and Lang Lang with piano. But he left little else out, and really must be commended for the sheer passion of his life long search, given here for the aid of others coming up perhaps feeling rudderless and alone.
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Author Recounts Long History of Humiliations For Asian Males But Offers Few Solutions 8 septembre 2014
Par VIDFAN - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié|Commentaire client Vine pour produit gratuit (De quoi s'agit-il?)
This is a very well-written, enlightening book that brings home how difficult it is to be an Asian American male in a society where "macho" and dominant "alpha male" attitudes are considered the ideal, versus the quiet, restrained and subtle philosophy of manhood that the philosophy of "Wen Wu" advocates. This is less a memoir of Alex Tizon's life, however, than a sociological study of how Asian American males have been historically undermined, humiliated and treated in a derogatory fashion by the mainstream, Western culture. This despite the myth of the "model minority," the economic "miracle" of Japan and other Asian Tiger countries, and the fact that China has risen to near-superpower status.

However, I can't help but feel this would have been a better book if it had been written by a Chinese or Japanese American rather than a Filippino-American. Most of the examples he cites involve East Asians (Chinese, Japanese, Korean, etc.) and there are far more of them in the U.S. than those from the Philippines. In other words, he is speaking as a minority within a minority, and I sense a tension from his attempt to broaden his unique, quirky perspective to include the experiences of all Filippino men as well as every man hailing from Asia (including Indians). At times this feels too ambitious and given the book's length (less than 300 pages), it feels unfocused.

Also, more than half the book is devoted to a recounting of grievances - a long catalog of the ways in which Asian men have been mistreated and made to feel inferior to Western men. Tizon seems to provide the obligatory "there's less racism and everything's better now" to provide some sense of closure in the final chapters, but this feels unsatisfactory given that he's brought up so many problems and doesn't offer much in the way of advice - how does an Asian male fight these unfair ways of seeing, and are there ways to cope and deal with the problem other than complaining?

In addition, Tizon never examines or criticizes the rigid, male-worshipping sexism of traditional Eastern culture and how this extreme contrast leaves many Asian males psychologically damaged. Imagine an Asian male who's treated, from birth, as a Prince by traditional, male-worshipping immigrant parents, only to be knocked off his pedestal and treated as a loser by Western society. The psychological damage to one's self-esteem must be considerable, but Tizon never delves into this.

Complementing this, the author talks at length about physical and genital sizes to explain why women of all races continually ignore Asian men but never wonders whether the East's long, well-documented history of harsh sexism has subtly influenced Asian women to shun their fellow countrymen. I've heard some Asian immigrant females express relief that, instead of being regarded as subhuman or a burden (females have been called "maggots" or "parasites" in China and Japan) white men here stampede to scoop them up as wives.
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Eye Opening, Honest Observations Sprinkled With Humor 19 août 2014
Par Wilhelmina Zeitgeist - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié|Commentaire client Vine pour produit gratuit (De quoi s'agit-il?)
"Big Little Man: In Search of My Asian Self" by Alex Tizon is an intriguing memoir about one man's sense of self through his life. It gave me the unique opportunity to see how someone of another race, from another culture views and compares themselves with other people and cultures within the society they live in. Tizon has brought us his story in a brutally honest, sometimes humorous, lighthearted way. We are also introduced to mass media Asian men, the roles they play, and how society views them and how media influences those views. Media also plays a role in how Asian American men may view themselves.

The author writes with excellent flow sprinkled with eye opening observations and infused with his terrific wit. I thoroughly got caught up in Tizon's story and could not put it down. This is a must read for Asian men as well as everyone else in the world who wants to really understand what it is like to be "different" from the "ideal" American man in the USA. It's a book that teaches us a lesson and makes us laugh at the same time.
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ?   Dites-le-nous

Discussions entre clients

Le forum concernant ce produit
Discussion Réponses Message le plus récent
Pas de discussions pour l'instant

Posez des questions, partagez votre opinion, gagnez en compréhension
Démarrer une nouvelle discussion
Thème:
Première publication:
Aller s'identifier
 

Rechercher parmi les discussions des clients
Rechercher dans toutes les discussions Amazon
   


Rechercher des articles similaires par rubrique