Cliquez ici Acheter Fire Shop Kindle Paperwhite cliquez_ici Bijoux Montres Montres boutique Tendance undrgrnd Cliquez ici Baby NEWNEEEW Cloud Drive Photos cliquez_ici Rentrée scolaire
Boys Will Be Boys et plus d'un million d'autres livres sont disponibles pour le Kindle d'Amazon. En savoir plus
EUR 23,22
  • Tous les prix incluent la TVA.
Habituellement expédié sous 2 à 4 semaines.
Expédié et vendu par Amazon.
Emballage cadeau disponible.
Quantité :1
Boys Will Be Boys: The Gl... a été ajouté à votre Panier
Vous l'avez déjà ?
Repliez vers l'arrière Repliez vers l'avant
Ecoutez Lecture en cours... Interrompu   Vous écoutez un extrait de l'édition audio Audible
En savoir plus
Voir les 2 images

Boys Will Be Boys: The Glory Days and Party Nights of the Dallas Cowboys Dynasty (Anglais) MP3 CD – Livre audio, MP3 Audio, Version intégrale

Voir les formats et éditions Masquer les autres formats et éditions
Prix Amazon
Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle
"Veuillez réessayer"
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 55,95 EUR 2,58
MP3 CD, Livre audio, MP3 Audio, Version intégrale
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 23,22
EUR 16,98 EUR 21,33
--Ce texte fait référence à une édition épuisée ou non disponible de ce titre.

Livres anglais et étrangers
Lisez en version originale. Cliquez ici

Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

Boys Will Be Boys, author Jeff Perlman’s rollicking, completely unabashed account of the glory days of “America’s Team”—the NFL Dallas Cowboys of the 1990s—was a New York Times bestseller in hardcover and selected by GQ as one of the Best Books of the Year. The uncensored exploits of Michael Irvin, Deion Sanders, Emmitt Smith, Troy Aikman, and the rest of the ’Boys on and off the football field, Boys Will Be Boys makes for riveting, shocking, often wildly hilarious reading.

--Ce texte fait référence à une édition épuisée ou non disponible de ce titre.

Quatrième de couverture

They were America's Team—the high-priced, high-glamour, high-flying Dallas Cowboys of the 1990s, who won three Super Bowls and made as many headlines off the field as on it. Led by Emmitt Smith, the charismatic Deion "Prime Time" Sanders, and Hall of Famers Troy Aikman and Michael Irvin, the Cowboys rank among the greatest of all NFL dynasties.

In similar fashion to his New York Times bestseller The Bad Guys Won!, about the 1986 New York Mets, in Boys Will Be Boys, award-winning writer Jeff Pearlman chronicles the outrageous antics and dazzling talent of a team fueled by ego, sex, drugs—and unrivaled greatness. Rising from the ashes of a 1–15 season in 1989 to capture three Super Bowl trophies in four years, the Dallas Cowboys were guided by a swashbuckling, skirt-chasing, power-hungry owner, Jerry Jones, and his two eccentric, hard-living coaches, Jimmy Johnson and Barry Switzer. Together the three built a juggernaut that America loved and loathed.

But for a team that was so dominant on Sundays, the Cowboys were often a dysfunctional circus the rest of the week. Irvin, nicknamed "The Playmaker," battled dual addictions to drugs and women. Charles Haley, the defensive colossus, presided over the team's infamous "White House," where the parties lasted late into the night and a steady stream of long-legged groupies came and went. And then there were Smith and Sanders, whose Texas-sized egos were eclipsed only by their record-breaking on-field perfomances.

With an unforgettable cast of characters and a narrative as hard-hitting and fast-paced as the team itself, Boys Will Be Boys immortalizes the most beloved—and despised—dynasty in NFL history.

--Ce texte fait référence à une édition épuisée ou non disponible de ce titre.

Aucun appareil Kindle n'est requis. Téléchargez l'une des applis Kindle gratuites et commencez à lire les livres Kindle sur votre smartphone, tablette ou ordinateur.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

Pour obtenir l'appli gratuite, saisissez votre adresse e-mail ou numéro de téléphone mobile.

Détails sur le produit

En savoir plus sur l'auteur

Découvrez des livres, informez-vous sur les écrivains, lisez des blogs d'auteurs et bien plus encore.

Dans ce livre

(En savoir plus)
Parcourir et rechercher une autre édition de ce livre.
Parcourir les pages échantillon
Couverture | Copyright | Table des matières | Extrait | Index | Quatrième de couverture
Rechercher dans ce livre:

Commentaires en ligne

Il n'y a pas encore de commentaires clients sur
5 étoiles
4 étoiles
3 étoiles
2 étoiles
1 étoiles

Commentaires client les plus utiles sur (beta) 149 commentaires
53 internautes sur 58 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Par Rick Shaq Goldstein - Publié sur
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
When the first chapter of a non-fiction football book starts off with future Hall Of Fame receiver Michael Irvin stabbing a teammate in the neck with a scissors... and blood is shooting all over the room... and the intensity of the lurid details... on and off the field... regarding the famed "dynastic" Dallas Cowboys of the 1990's... never lets up for the next three-hundred-fifty-eight pages... you know you've got a great book in your hands. Any true football fan, regardless of what team you root for will want to read this book. There are so many riveting... outlandish... insider... stories... that you will constantly want to stop reading for a moment or two... just to call one of your buddies to tell him what you just read!

This book has it all. From the "humble" beginnings (as far as wins and losses that is... nothing about any of the key individuals in this story could ever be considered humble!) concerning the 1989 Cowboys who had a one-win fifteen-loss season... to the three-time Super Bowl Champions. The author smoothly gives you detailed background information on everyone from owner Jerry Jones to coach Jimmy Johnson to Troy Aikman/Emmitt Smith/Michael Irvin/Nate Newton/Charles Haley/Deion Sanders... and every Cowboy large... small... or in between... who effected the team on or off the field... good or bad. Absolutely no punches are pulled.

From drug busts, that included Michael Irvin and teammate Alfredo Roberts being caught with 10.3 grams of cocaine, more than an ounce of marijuana, assorted drug paraphernalia and sex toys... and oh yea... two strippers... to shocking exposes regarding eventual FIVE-TIME-SUPER-BOWL-CHAMPION Charles Haley who would expose himself... and "pleasure-himself"... in front of teammates in the locker room... training room... and meeting rooms... to famous quotes from players, that truly thought they were above the law, are provided... such as when three-hundred-sixty pound Nate Newton said: "WE'VE GOT A LITTLE PLACE OVER HERE WHERE WE'RE RUNNING SOME WHORES IN AND OUT, TRYING TO BE RESPONSIBLE, AND WE'RE CRITICIZED FOR THAT, TOO."

Did you know that when former Cowboy owner Bum Bright sold the team to Jerry Jones... that one of the conditions of the sale was that Jones had to fire Tom Landry? Landry was probably the most popular man in Texas, but Bright couldn't stand him. How did the Cowboys code of ethics compare to other big name NFL teams? One Cowboy said: "WHEN I WAS WITH THE REDSKINS COACH GIBBS WOULD SAY, "OK FELLA'S, DON'T MESS WITH STREET DRUGS OR STEROIDS, BECAUSE THAT'S NOT HOW WE DO THINGS HERE." COACH JOHNSON ON THE OTHER HAND, WOULD SAY, "DON'T MESS WITH STREET DRUGS OR STEROIDS, BECAUSE THE DRUG TEST IS IN A WEEK AND YOU DON'T WANNA GET CAUGHT." "IT WAS OBVIOUS JIMMY LACKED SOME CHARACTER IN HIS PURSUIT OF GREATNESS."

It's all here in exquisite detail. Nothing is held back. The way players... coaches... and owners... really feel! Who they think is stupid... who is smart... who had courage and who didn't. One Cowboy whose valor won over his team was Troy Aikman, of whom linebacker Garry Cobb said: AS A ROOKIE AGAINST THE CARDINALS AIKMAN "WAS KNOCKED COLD FOR NEARLY FIVE MINUTES BEFORE BEING HELPED OFF THE FIELD. TROY EARNED ALL OUR RESPECT. HE GOT KILLED AND REFUSED TO CRY. I'VE BEEN ON THE FIELD WHEN QUARTERBACKS CRY, AND IT AIN'T PRETTY. DAN MARINO WAS A CRIER - "WHOSE MAN WAS THAT! WHERE'S THE BLOCKING! WHAH!" "BUT AIKMAN - NEVER. AIKMAN WAS A MAN."

The author, Jeff Pearlman, magically, and seamlessly, weaves a story that gives you equal servings of statistical game information... unwavering disections of diverse psychological profiles... including Jerry Jones's jealousies and Jimmy Johnson's insecurities... and the sensitive human backdrop's... such as Michael Irvin... the third youngest of SEVENTEEN CHILDREN... who never had his own bed until college.

I recommend this book highly to any football fan.
13 internautes sur 13 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Loved it! 3 janvier 2009
Par Roberto H - Publié sur
Format: Relié
I highly recommend this book to anyone who: a) was a big fan of the early 90's Cowboys, b) is curious about what goes on behind the scenes in the NFL, or c) is interested in the impact leadership has on organizations. This book comes up juicy in all three categories.

This book is great because it avoids the common mistake made by authors documenting certain teams. Instead of going through the boring minutiae of old games, Jeff Pearlman gives gripping, inside stories that no fan ever knew about. For example:

- Michael Irvin was the heart and soul of the team. Period.
- Nobody liked Emmitt Smith.
- Charles Haley, WTF?
- The players, for as much as they hated Jimmy Johnson, respected the heck out of him. How he shaped them psychologically and then kept them on the edge was stellar.
- Jerry Jones is a prideful retard, sure. But I never knew he was that big of one.
- Switzer was actually a pretty likable guy with whom you can really empathize. But, man, he really had no business being there.
- Skip Bayless is a massive dork.

I had a blast reading this book. Highly recommend.
4 internautes sur 4 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Boys SHOULD sometimes not be boys 16 septembre 2008
Par Martha Frankel - Publié sur
Format: Relié
Almost 35 years after Peter Gent's seminal "North Dallas Forty" showed us what untamed beasts football players could be, Jeff Pearlman delivers "Boys Will Be Boys," which, not coincidentally, is also about the freewheeling, demented, and fiercely determined Dallas Cowboys, once and always dubbed "America's Team."

Except Pearlman's Cowboys are those of the 1990s, the ones who followed the firing of legendary coach Tom Landry, and who make the men of "Forty" look like altar boys.

The dean of Dallas decadence was wide receiver Michael Irvin, known as The Playmaker. "Did he love snorting coke? Yes. Did he love lesbian sex shows? Yes. Did he love sleeping with two, three, four, five (yes, five) women at the same time in precisely choreographed orgies? Yes. Did he love strip clubs and hookers and house calls from exotic dancers with names like Bambi and Cherry and Saucy? Yes, yes, yes."

But because Texas is football, Irvin's antics, including an arrest for cocaine possession and stabbing a teammate who Irvin believed dissed him by cutting in line to get a haircut, were waved away with a smile. And when Irvin helped turn the hapless Cowboys around, from 1-15 losers in 1989 to multiple Super Bowl champs by the mid-'90s, well, hookers were practically handed out with the after-game painkillers.

Pearlman, a former senior writer for Sports Illustrated and a contributor to [...] Page Two, also wrote "The Bad Guys Won!" about the 1986 Mets and "Love Me, Hate Me," about Barry Bonds. So he has some experience with talented villains you love to hate.

Nowhere is this clearer than in the story of Charles Haley, who came to the Cowboys when they most needed "a disruptive, no-holds-barred defensive lineman - the type of player who put fear in the hearts of rival quarterbacks."

Haley "quickly earned high praise as one of the league's dominant quarterback killers. And as one of its most imbalanced."

A lot of it had to do with Haley's exceptionally large penis, which he liked to expose to players, trainers, management and reporters. Sometimes he would take it out and stroke it inches from another player's face; the players tried to laugh it off but Haley was relentless. He would masturbate during meetings, all the while trash-talking other player's wives. Once Haley wrapped an Ace bandage around it and strolled through the locker room, screaming, "I'm the last naked warrior!"

How, you might be asking yourself, did the team's coach, Jimmy Johnson, or it's owner, Jerry Jones, allow this to go on? Simple - Haley, who had helped the San Francisco 49ers win two Super Bowls in six seasons before coming to Dallas, "knew the game better than any of us," said former teammate Antonio Goss. "He could pick up little patterns and cues that nobody else would see. Charles might have been odd, but he was intelligent and incisive."

The drama between coach and owner was equally fascinating. Jones and Johnson had come to the Cowboys together, but despite appearances, had little love for each other. In fact, the coach learned he was being fired from a local Dallas reporter. "It's not always pleasant," Jones told a reporter. "But leadership means making tough decisions."

The Cowboys kept taking chances on players that other clubs were thrilled to cut from their rosters. And what did they get for their troubles? Hoodlums, nutcases and out-and-out psychopaths, who somehow managed to pull it all together on Sunday afternoons, piling up more and more winning games and seasons. So what's a little coke and hookers?

Hats & Eyeglasses: A Family Love Affair with Gambling
6 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
"You mean to tell me there are places where women get naked? And they serve food there, too?" 27 décembre 2008
Par Mary G. Longorio - Publié sur
Format: Relié
Anyone who spent any time out in clubs or had friends or relatives in either the "entertainment" industry or law enforcement in the Dallas/Ft Worth area heard stories of the excesses of Michael Irvin, Charles Haley, Deion Sanders, Emmitt Smith, Kenny Gant ("You mean to tell me there are places where women get naked? And they serve food there, too?") as well as other Dallas Cowboy football players and staff in the 1990's. The existence of a player owned "safe house" (the White House) where players and staff could indulge in drugs, alcohol, violence and a seemingly endless supply of willing women was an open secret. The near fatal DUI accident of right tackle Erik Williams and other car crashes involving players were hushed up with assistance from a compliant and dependent media. A caravan of limos ferrying "skanks" for the enjoyment of players and their guests (better to bring known women than chance the dangers of women found in clubs and hotels) to Tempe, Arizona for Super Bowl XXX. What could anyone say? Owner Jerry Jones had included his own party vehicle in the caravan...a six bed tour bus that had once been owned by Whitney Houston. The Cowboys were consumed and controlled by their giant egos and addictions.

All this excess could be forgiven, overlooked and hushed up until the Cowboys committed the unpardonable sin. The Dallas Cowboys quit winning and began to look foolish. The Cowboys began to show the effects of partying, bad coaching, foolish management decisions and lack of leadership and were being beaten on the field. Author Jeff Pearlman returns with yet another book of sports heroes gone bad: Boys Will be Boys, the Glory Days and Party Nights of the Dallas Cowboys Dynasty. Following the ascent of the 1990's Dallas Cowboys team, from the acquisition by Jerry Jones to the multiple Super Bowl appearances to the drug use, whoring, suicide attempts and lawlessness that was an open secret in the Metroplex, Pearlman holds nothing back. There are moments of good behavior, humor and community service, but they are overwhelmed by the sheer volume of the excesses practiced by many on the team. What sets this book apart is Pearlman's meticulous research; the hours spent talking to players, ex-players, law enforcement, front office and coaching staff. It would be easy to lay out all the misdeeds of the Cowboys squads (and coaching staff) under coaches Jimmy Johnson and Barry Switzer. Rather than vilify the players, Pearlman tracks the decline and end of the "anything goes" Cowboys. He is quick to point out factors and backgrounds that might have predisposed some of the behaviors. He also acknowledges the press' part in turning a blind eye in order to get scoops and party with the players. From the top of the Cowboy food chain Pearlman dissects the choices and is very blunt in his appraisals of players and staff (finally someone outs John Blake as a waste of space and divisive in the locker room). The out of control organization was in danger of destroying the legacy left by previous owners, coaches and players as well as destroying thier own futures. While Pearlman gives an accounting of misdeeds he also gives room for a bittersweet epilogue, the induction into the Football Hall of Fame of Michael Irvin. This is a must for any true Cowboy fan who can appreciate the complexity of today's football machine and wants the Cowboys to succeed once again.
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
A must for any CFFL 26 décembre 2008
Par Tammi Gray - Publié sur
Format: Relié
Great read. The first chapter will grab you. The next 100 pages will keep your attention. And after that you probably won't want to put it down. The book brilliantly fills in a lot of the gaps between the various headlines over the years (Jimmy's firing, the White House, Emmitt's holdout, bringing in Deion, Irvin's arrest(s), etc.) as well as providing a glimpse into the rather salacious lifestyles of many of America's Team's finest (Irvin, Harper, Haley...) Highly recommend it - especially for the Cowboy fan for life like me. GO COWBOYS!
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ? Dites-le-nous


Souhaitez-vous compléter ou améliorer les informations sur ce produit ? Ou faire modifier les images?