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Brahms : Symphonies No.3 & 4, Overtures
 
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Brahms : Symphonies No.3 & 4, Overtures

Christoph Eschenbach/Houston Symphony Orchestra
6 avril 2009 | Format : MP3

EUR 8,99 (TVA incluse le cas échéant)
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Titre Artiste
Durée
Popularité  
30
1
13:39
30
2
9:14
30
3
7:49
30
4
9:03
30
5
13:54
Disc 2
30
1
13:34
30
2
13:01
30
3
6:28
30
4
10:28
30
5
14:44
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Amazon.com: HASH(0x90573a5c) étoiles sur 5 2 commentaires
5 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x90ba8e28) étoiles sur 5 Brahms In Texas (Part 2) 6 avril 2011
Par Amazon Customer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD
During the 1880s, with radical Romanticism in music being expounded all around him in the forms of Wagner and Bruckner, Johannes Brahms still clung to the traditions of the past when it came to making his own kind of music, though utilizing roughly the same orchestral forces of his more limit-pushing contemporaries. This could be reflected in the works featured on this second 2-CD set of Brahms' symphonies made in the early 1990s by the Houston Symphony Orchestra and their conductor laureate Christoph Eschenbach for Virgin Classics.

The first CD in this set opens with the composer's Symphony No. 3, composed in 1883 and, jarringly, the least performed of any of Brahms' symphonies. Many are caught off guard by the fact that all four movements, even the last one, don't end with a roof-raising final chord but end in quiet contemplation. Just as importantly, Brahms eliminates the tuba that was featured in the Second Symphony, keeping the trombones in there, for a work whose orchestral forces are roughly those of the Schubert Ninth, and Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony, which the Third roughly resembles in both key (F Major) and feel. Its comparative neglect in the Brahms' canon, once one really listens to it closely, is not all that easy to understand. Included here is an early work for chorus and orchestra, the 1869 Alto Rhapsody for alto vocal soloist, male chorus, and orchestra whose text is derived from the poem "Harsziese Im Winter" by Goethe. It is a work of extreme poignancy of the sort that only Brahms, it seems, was capable of during that period of time in music.

The second CD here gives us the fourth and final symphony in the Brahms canon, a work in E Minor that found the composer in a very reflective mood at the time he composed it (1885), containing as it does his one and only orchestral Scherzo in the third movement, and a hugely dramatic final movement that showed all he knew about being able to compose dramatic works that didn't go to the extremes soon to be seen in Mahler. Included here is the concert overture that, in the words of Brahms himself, weeps--the highly charged 1880 Tragic Overture, in the portentous key of D Minor (the same he used for his Piano Concerto No. 1, as well as that of the Beethoven Ninth). The composer had no particular "tragedy" in mind, just to compose a makeweight for its companion, the Academic Festival Overture.

As with the first 2-CD set, both Eschenbach and his Houston Symphony show here why they had become one of the great conductor/orchestra combines in the world during the 1990s, taking on a great composer's symphonies long after they had become entrenched warhorses in the concert halls and on recordings. Dunja Vejzovic and the male members of the Houston Symphony Chorus are featured in the Alto Rhapsody, which is done especially well; and the orchestra's somewhat slow but powerful rendering of the Tragic Overture is extremely compelling. It is a recording very much worth having in my estimation.
1 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x903118c4) étoiles sur 5 Did Brahms make his music in a candy shop? 20 mai 2009
Par Santa Fe Listener - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD
I remember reading some glowing reviews of Eschenbach's Brahms cycle from Houston when it first appeared in the early Nineties. The Gramophone was generally unimpressed, but at the time there were few enough new Brahms cycles from the U.S. Too bad, then, that a relisten reveals how flabby, boring, and willful Eschenbach's efforts are.

His general slant is to overly romanticize and soften Brahms, turning the music's strength and impact aside, favoring only sweetness and lyricism to the point that every symphony, indeed every movement, completely lacks a spine. We just move from prettiness to prettiness. There's no doubt that the Houston Sym. plays well or that Virgin's digital sound is sweet, full, and detailed.

From the five-star raves here at Amazon, one would think that Eschenbach is a master of his craft. but I defy anyone to produce a Brahms Third that maunders to such little effect or a Brahms Fourth so limp and pointless? Caveat emptor.
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