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A Brief History Of Time: From Big Bang To Black Holes
 
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A Brief History Of Time: From Big Bang To Black Holes [Format Kindle]

Stephen Hawking
5.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (4 commentaires client)

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Descriptions du produit

Revue de presse

"'Master of the Universe...One scientist's courageous voyage to the frontiers of the Cosmos'" (Newsweek)

"'This book marries a child's wonder to a genius's intellect. We journey into Hawking's universe, while marvelling at his mind'" (The Sunday Times)

"'He can explain the complexities of cosmological physics with an engaging combination of clarity and wit...His is a brain of extraordinary power'" (Observer)

"'To follow such a fine mind as it exposes such great problems is an exciting experience'" (The Sunday Times)

"'One of the most brilliant scientific minds since Einstein'" (Daily Express)

Présentation de l'éditeur

Was there a beginning of time? Could time run backwards? Is the universe infinite or does it have boundaries? These are just some of the questions considered in an internationally acclaimed masterpiece by one of the world's greatest thinkers. It begins by reviewing the great theories of the cosmos from Newton to Einstein, before delving into the secrets which still lie at the heart of space and time, from the Big Bang to black holes, via spiral galaxies and strong theory. To this day A Brief History of Time remains a staple of the scientific canon, and its succinct and clear language continues to introduce millions to the universe and its wonders.

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Commentaires client les plus utiles
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Un livre passionant 19 décembre 2009
Format:Relié
Ce livre même lu en anglais par un jeune de 14 ans comme moi avec un petit dico à portée de main est une vrai mine d'informations sans formules complexes . Vraiment un livre à lire pour savoir ce qui se passe dans l'espace !
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 Time is of the essence 21 décembre 2005
Par FrKurt Messick TOP 1000 COMMENTATEURS
Format:Broché
The mark of a true educator, which Stephen Hawking certainly is, is that he would take time (very valuable time, in his case) away from research and contemplation of the great mysteries of the universe to write a piece that would serve to help explain to the greater number of less-scientifically-adept persons the fruits and implications of modern scientific research from the cutting edge of physics. Hawking is ranked in popular and scientific thinking on a par with Einstein, and has motor neuron disability that severely restricts his ability to move, even to type or write, so, when he takes time to write something for general consumption, it is probably going to be worthwhile. And indeed, this is.
'Someone told me that each equation I included in the book would halve sales. I therefore resolved not to have any equations at all. In the end, however, I did put in one equation, Einstein's famous equation. I hope that this will not scare off half of my potential readers.'
Hawking begins by exploring the large scale structure of the universe (time being part of the `fabric' of the universe, in spacetime), the connections of space and time as a relatively new concept in thinking of the universe, and the way the universe `acts' (cosmological dynamics). From there, he explores the universe at a very basic level, as elementary particles and forces of nature, introducing quarks.
'There are a number of different varieties of quarks: there are thought to be at least six "flavours", which we call up, down, strange, charmed, bottom and top. Each flavour comes in three "colours", red, green and blue. ...We now know that neither the atoms nor the protons and neutrons within them are indivisible.
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 Time is of the essence 21 décembre 2005
Par FrKurt Messick TOP 1000 COMMENTATEURS
Format:Cassette
The mark of a true educator, which Stephen Hawking certainly is, is that he would take time (very valuable time, in his case) away from research and contemplation of the great mysteries of the universe to write a piece that would serve to help explain to the greater number of less-scientifically-adept persons the fruits and implications of modern scientific research from the cutting edge of physics. Hawking is ranked in popular and scientific thinking on a par with Einstein, and has motor neuron disability that severely restricts his ability to move, even to type or write, so, when he takes time to write something for general consumption, it is probably going to be worthwhile. And indeed, this is.
'Someone told me that each equation I included in the book would halve sales. I therefore resolved not to have any equations at all. In the end, however, I did put in one equation, Einstein's famous equation. I hope that this will not scare off half of my potential readers.'
Hawking begins by exploring the large scale structure of the universe (time being part of the `fabric' of the universe, in spacetime), the connections of space and time as a relatively new concept in thinking of the universe, and the way the universe `acts' (cosmological dynamics). From there, he explores the universe at a very basic level, as elementary particles and forces of nature, introducing quarks.
'There are a number of different varieties of quarks: there are thought to be at least six "flavours", which we call up, down, strange, charmed, bottom and top. Each flavour comes in three "colours", red, green and blue. ...We now know that neither the atoms nor the protons and neutrons within them are indivisible.
Lire la suite ›
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 It does what it says 1 mars 2014
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
No wonder this book was such a big hit when it was first released - the story it tells of Time and Space is facinating and it is told without recourse to heavy technicalities. It is an amazing piece of work and is just as relevant today as it was when first published. If you want to read about what space and the cosmos mean then this is the first stop, even for me it was enjoyable and still interesting to read the thoughts of a true genius.
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Amazon.com: 4.5 étoiles sur 5  141 commentaires
25 internautes sur 28 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Modern Physics for the Layman and Everyone 12 octobre 2005
Par gobirds2 - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
This is a wonderful book. It really explains many concepts of modern physics in layman's terms. Often we hear scientific words bantered about on various educational television programming without really understanding the concepts and theories behind them. This book goes into concise detail on quite a few topics and does a rather good job explaining them. I thought the explanation of Einstein's general theory of relativity was well done. The explanation of time differential when matter nears the speed of light was explained quite clearly. It truly is relative from your vantage point. Also the concept of space being curved was well presented. This is really a very interesting book. I truly couldn't put it down when I found it in the library. It really stimulates your thought processes and gives you new perspectives on the world we live in. I really like this book.
26 internautes sur 32 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 The Original (has introduction by Carl Sagan and missing Chapter 10) 15 avril 2007
Par OverTheMoon - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
For those who thought they knew the mind of God

A Brief History of Time (ABHOT) has been with me since its first publication. I now feel, after nearly 20 years of it as a passive hobby, to be able to comprehend and explain what it means to me. It is a deeply personal voyage that I am most glad to have undertaken.

Firstly to call this just a science book, a view I once held, is an understatement. It is both a scientific presentation and the exposure of the corruption of minds that submit completely to a mystery answer for mystery questions. You cannot separate the two in this book. They are interlinked by ABHOT's critic of the persistence of some members of mankind to maintain a wanton lack of knowledge.

This armchair sufficiency in a mystery answer must be combated at all costs in order for us to stop denying that we possess a large brain. If we invoke the mystery explanation as the answer for anything then God just might as well have finished with the spinal cord which would have been enough for us. We are faced with the facts. Creation happened and we want to know how. Hawking knows how.

Since this book deals specifically with theological questions and scientific ones it would be best to start with the theology problems posed by Hawking (the word God appears 40 times). Hawking claims that in 1981, at the end of a conference on cosmology organized by the Jesuits in the Vatican that they "...were granted an audience with the Pope. He told us that it was all right to study the evolution of the universe after the big bang, but we should not inquire into the big bang itself because that was the moment of Creation and therefore the work of God." Whether the Pope said this or not is up for debate (the Pope has made official declarations on this matter and they do not feature this element of non-inquiry) but Hawking thinks he knows how this God went about his business. The book builds up to the explanation of the universe starting with this critic of the Church in Chapter 8 - Origins and Fate of the Universe, which describes the history of time as we know it and gives the Church a nudge in the process.

It is obvious that Hawking, strictly using the scientific method, describes the history of time without invoking God or a mystery. Hawking shows us that he knows things about how creation came about and that at no point is an intelligence being used to describe the cosmos. This veil, he believes, was removed long ago with Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Newton, Einstein and now once more by himself.

This is not the first time the Catholic Church is featured in the book. It has a historical relationship with cosmology and a pretty poor one when it comes to Galileo who effectively ended the dark ages by reviving Greek mathematics and physics with an obvious fact that the heaven's change. The Church simply got this badly wrong whatever way you try to cut it (how can God's representatives get it so badly wrong?). The Earth is not the centre of universe. How does the Catholic Church keep their claim to God's representative on Earth if other people are explaining creation without recourse to a mystery? Hawking gives you problem equation that the Church is now dealing with. That equation is... the more we explain things, the less there is for God to do. God = ?

Now we get down to the brass tacks after finishing with this quick lesson about a major negative in theology. How does Hawking know there is less for God to do in his model of the universe? The answer is in the laws that exist and that remain unbroken. Things are the way they are. If God created the universe, he did it this way, the one we observe, the one with laws he doesn't break.

According to Hawking if we know what these laws are then we understand everything there is about how the universe governs itself. This means predicting what it will do. So how do they do that? How do these men of science come up with such outstanding prophecies! Probably the best way to go about ABHOT is to break it down into easy to understand sections.

Contrary to book blurbs, even though this is made for the layman, you can't do it with just this book alone unless you have a background in studying physics. Intense study over the period of several months, years even, as was my case, may be required.

Introduction by Carl Sagan.

Chapter 1 - Our Picture of the Universe
This chapter is easy to understand. It deals with the history of mankind's perception of the universe and gives special note to the Catholic Church's dealings with Copernicus and Galileo. In short the net result is that Churches tell us how to get to heaven while scientists tell us how the heavens work. The Earth actually goes around the sun.

Chapter 2 - Space and Time
Quickly combining Newtonian Gravity with Einstein's relativity we are given examples of spacetime models to explain the speed of light, how time can dilate, light cones and the geometry of spacetime according to relativity (imagine a rubber mesh with balls creating dips in the mesh that in turn create contours, called geodesics, for objects to follow naturally). Mass grips space by telling it how to curve, space grips mass by telling it how to move.*
*If this Chapter does not make sense then read "Introducing Newton and Classical Physics" by William Rankin for Newtonian Physics and "Introducing Relativity" by Bruce Bassett.

Chapter 3 - The Expanding Universe
Astronomical observations by Hubble (has the telescope named after him) prove that the universe is expanding which means at one time in the past it was all together. Penzias and Wilson in 1965 discovered background radiation noise from the big bang. Friedman's projected model of the universe is analysed and Hawking introduces three outcomes where two expands forever and one collapses in eventually, from a big bang to a big crunch.

Chapter 4 - The Uncertainty Principle
This chapter quickly covers three important scientific experiments (blackbody radiation, photoelectric effect and the double-slit experiment problem) that led to the development of Quantum Mechanics and the uncertainty principle that the process of measuring particles on the quantum scale can alter some their attributes*.
*While this chapter can be understood somewhat on its own, it is terribly short. Brian Greene's "The Elegant Universe" explains it a whole lot better in Chapter 4 - Microscopic Weirdness.

Chapter 5 - Elementary Particles and the Forces of Nature
**Stop Here**. You are not going to understand this part. You could skip this section but then you will not understand Chapter 7. "Introducing Quantum Theory" by J. P. McEvoy does it a lot better and also compliments the Greene book. Spend as long as you need to get an understanding of this. Relativity and quantum mechanics are not unified by the model presented by Hawking (gravity is not unified with the strong or electroweak force). Thus relativity describes macro events, while Quantum Mechanics describes subatomic particle events.

Chapter 6 - Black Holes
Hawking describes the history of Black Holes, what they are and how they advanced our understanding of quantum mechanics and relativity. Keywords are John Wheeler, Chandrasekhar, Oppenheimer and Cygus X-1.

Chapter 7 - Black Holes Ain't So Black
Hawking describes the dynamics of the black hole incorporating quantum mechanics. This section is why Chapter 5 needs to be understood very well.

Chapter 8 - The Origin and Fate of the Universe
This is the big description of how we came to be from the beginnings up until now with the predicted future of the universe which is described as a finite without boundary model. Keywords are Gamow, inflation and Guth.

Chapter 9 - The Arrow of Time
This is amazing. Here Hawking answers the question about Entropy and why the macro universe is gravitating towards disorder in the system it is in. Call an apple order and imagine all the possibilities of a disordered apple. There are much more possibilities of disorder than order. However since our universe was ordered according to the big bang event then the disorder model when collapsed backwards reveals events becoming more ordered as they return to their original state.*
*This chapter excludes how systems can become more ordered in systems that are not closed such as our planet which did not generate or destroy energy or change the balance of energy in the universe because the energy used in our evolution was transformed finally into heat which leaves the planet and goes back into the universe.

Chapter 10 - Wormholes and Time Travel
This chapter did not appear in the original edition. It appears in the new one. Einstein-Rosen bridges are more in-depth in Greene's work.

Chapter 10 (11 in new book) - The Unification of Physics
Hawking points to strings as a possible unification theory. The prediction looks good. Brian Greene's "The Elegant Universe" is a whole book about this. Relativity and quantum mechanics are unified by the models found in superstring theory (see M-Theory and Edward Witten).

Chapter 11 (12 in new book) - Conclusion
Hawking sums up his thoughts.

Glossary
You will reference this constantly to remember important terms. Put it to great use.

Ultimately Hawking does not say God does not exist (that would impossible to prove) but he can certainly critic those who think they know his mind. Wouldn't you think that if anyone was going to dictate how his world works that it would be the Church he started? Consult Galileo on attempts to show them how it worked.

Hawking is obviously the best explanation for creation since the writers of Genesis redacted the creation account from the Enuma Elish somewhere over 2200 years ago.

Living at the end of the 20th century meant being privy to facts that no one else had understood before. I only got it in the 21st. Why settle for anything less than the truth?

Thank you Mr. Hawking for explaining creation like no one else has done before.
9 internautes sur 10 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Take a little time to understand time... 30 mai 2006
Par wry and mighty - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
This book was written in 1987, and since then others have made developments in physics available to the layman. (See Brian Greene's Elegant Universe, and I believe Hawking has an updated version of Brief History out now.) But this book became available from a friend and I jumped at the opportunity to read it.

Hawking's writing style is very reader-friendly, and generally in layman's terms. There are no equations in this book, although he constantly refers to crunching numbers with relativistic and quantum mechanical equations. The reason why this book remains a good read is because it explains how our understanding of our universe developed from the time of Aristotle through Copernicus, Galileo, Einstein and the scientists of the 20th century. Hawking does a great job explaining how our notions changed as relativity and quantum mechanics were shown to be valid models of physical behavior.

It seems that Hawking's passion is for black holes, but his discussion of them seems very abstract to me. I was more captivated by one of the final chapters called the Arrow of Time. He poses the question of why the thermodynamic, psychological, and cosmological arrows of time run in the same direction. In other words, why does it take energy to create order, why don't we remember the future, and why is the universe expanding? Would it be plausible the other way around? There are lots of intriguing ideas in this brief survey - highly recommended.
6 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Brilliantly Clear 10 juillet 2012
Par Michaelb - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
Hawking's book is very clear and despite the complexity of the subject understandable to a person like me who has not had a science lesson in his life. It is true that I had to read a few sections a few times until I got it, but that is not his fault but rather my ignorance. I also like the way he slips through the theologically tricky parts of our present knowledge, where others have been truly dogmatic and unpleasantly partisan. About the most comprehensive book on cosmology I have read. Since 1996 I am sure that much has happened and many new discoveries made. I cannot help wondering what he would say about the implications of the discovery of Higgs Boson. It is a fascinating read and particularly useful for getting a broad grasp of the subject. I now look forward to getting myself more up to date.
8 internautes sur 9 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Interesting but tough reading 30 mai 2004
Par Diego Zlotogora - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
Have you ever thought how everything started? This is what Hawking explains by describing the current theories about the universe.
Although he tries hard to keep it simple, his scientific background doesn't let him be clear enough in some concepts, which are difficult to grasp for ordinary people.
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