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Book by Weteschnik Martin


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Détails sur le produit

  • Broché: 344 pages
  • Editeur : Quality Chess UK LLP; Édition : 2nd Revised edition (16 avril 2012)
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 1907982027
  • ISBN-13: 978-1907982026
  • Dimensions du produit: 17,1 x 1,9 x 24,1 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 5.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (1 commentaire client)
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Par Chess Buff le 10 février 2014
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Je ne l'ai pas encore terminé, mais rien que le premier chapitre sur le clouage est très convaincant. Un très bon livre pour découvrir l'aspect tactique des échecs ou, pour les joueurs confirmés, ramener son jeu sur ce qui fait tout le piment des 64 cases.
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Amazon.com: 12 commentaires
17 internautes sur 19 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Advanced Chess Tactics and more 9 août 2012
Par Derek Grimmell - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
Of course, it's absolutely essential to study many hundreds of tactical problems and puzzles in order to get good at tactics. No one can swing a bat or play an instrument without lots and lots of practice, and the same is true of tactics.

This book, by Martin Weteschnik, picks up at this point (you can use it before, of course, but don't try to skip the step of studying large numbers of puzzles). If you've done your homework on tactics and find you can now solve many positions at a glance, yet sometimes remain stubbornly blind to the tactical opportunities available, BUY THIS BOOK.

What the author has done is revert to the principles that make each standard tactic work, and done a couple of innovative things. First, he systematizes the conditions that have to exist on the board in order for the tactic to work -- giving the student a pattern to look for -- and then provides a "thinking approach" to practice as well. The "thinking approach" is a specific set of questions the student can ask that will make tactical possibilities pop out in the position.

My own experience is that this really works. One of my favorite tactical exercises is to watch blitz games by titled players on-line, on the Internet Chess Club or Playchess. I did this after working through the chapter on "the pin," which you would think I should have already understood pretty well. Yet watching two IMs, I spotted a tactic that both of them missed (confirmed later on Houdini), and I knew I had spotted it because I had been practicing looking for the antecedents using this book's approach.

I'm convinced. This is an approach, not so much to learning tactics, but rather to getting more efficient and comprehensive at spotting them in actual games. So far it seems to work. Bravo to the author for making one of the more difficult aspects of chess a little easier!
15 internautes sur 17 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Great ideas, poorly written. 4 décembre 2012
Par Christy - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
This could be a 5-star book, because the concepts are superb and the diagrams are totally original. There ought to be lots of "ah ha!" moments for the reader, except for one thing: the writing is incredibly bad. What can you make of this sentence?: "As you will remember, the discoverer's target is the square the discoverer moves to in order to discover the attack of the principal attacker on the victim piece or victim square." Or how about this one: "It is increasingly difficult to spot the key move when the first piece greatly changes the conditions on the square for the second piece to perform a special tactic on this square." These sentences sound like something from the IRS. I wish I could say that they're easier to understand in context, but they aren't. I'm not sorry I bought the book, but I'm disappointed in the author. He simply doesn't have the ability to explain things clearly, which is so essential for a chess writer.
12 internautes sur 14 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Theory + Testing with game analysis 10 juin 2012
Par Shoedude - Publié sur Amazon.com
Achat vérifié
First of all this is a high quality print job all the way. The book has a nice cover, paper, diagrams, feels great to hold, etc. But here's the deal: if you're not one of those who can intuit how to spot 2-3 move combos simply from work solving puzzles (i.e, you aren't an intuitive learner), then this book spoon-feeds you some suggestions. Personally, I feel a hardworking improver shouldn't need all this handholding. Just solve puzzles - and the more the better; memorize the themes and patterns and try to apply them in your games. So this book is basically aimed at the stagnant 1500-1700 player who is not willing (or able) to do the work of solving 30+ puzzles a day. Because if you were actually to do this for months on end, you should eventually figure out how to spot the tactical patterns lurking in the position. In essence the author tells you what you should have learned from solving lots of puzzles, but (for some reason) didn't - hence the title. Incidentally, the book is also a collection of tips from what the author himself (an FM) learned by solving thousands of puzzles! So the bottom line is this is a feel-good book that looks good too. My suggestion is only buy it if you're wanting more theory than practice. If you want expert-level tactics, you'll need to solve a lot of puzzles - this book has 300.
9 internautes sur 11 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Taking people who are reasonably good at tactics to a new level 5 juin 2012
Par Derek Grimmell - Publié sur Amazon.com
Of course, it's absolutely essential to study many hundreds of tactical problems and puzzles in order to get good at tactics. No one can swing a bat or play an instrument without lots and lots of practice, and the same is true of tactics.

This book, by Martin Weteschnik, picks up at this point (you can use it before, of course, but don't try to skip the step of studying large numbers of puzzles). If you've done your homework on tactics and find you can now solve many positions at a glance, yet sometimes remain stubbornly blind to the tactical opportunities available, BUY THIS BOOK.

What the author has done is revert to the principles that make each standard tactic work, and done a couple of innovative things. First, he systematizes the conditions that have to exist on the board in order for the tactic to work -- giving the student a pattern to look for -- and then provides a "thinking approach" to practice as well. The "thinking approach" is a specific set of questions the student can ask that will make tactical possibilities pop out in the position.

My own experience is that this really works. One of my favorite tactical exercises is to watch blitz games by titled players on-line, on the Internet Chess Club or Playchess. I did this after working through the chapter on "the pin," which you would think I should have already understood pretty well. Yet watching two IMs, I spotted a tactic that both of them missed (confirmed later on Houdini), and I knew I had spotted it because I had been practicing looking for the antecedents using this book's approach.

I'm convinced. This is an approach, not so much to learning tactics, but rather to getting more efficient and comprehensive at spotting them in actual games. So far it seems to work. Bravo to the author for making one of the more difficult aspects of chess a little easier!
8 internautes sur 11 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
OK, but there are many better books on tactics 10 juillet 2013
Par Bubba Tough - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
In chess, tactical awareness is the most important skill you can have, and not surprisingly there are a lot of books that try to help you with that. Many of them are quite good, which makes the bar for new books in this area quite high. For me, this book fails to reach the standards set by other books in this area. There are basically 2 genres of tactics books, A) ones that present a lot of examples and little or no explanation for how to solve tactics, and B) ones that spend a lot of time on explanations. This book falls into the second category. For experienced chess players, that know what a pin and a double attack is, I would personally avoid category B books and concentrate on category A books. This includes most tournament chess players. A good book in this genre which simply presents a lot of chess problems would be Richard Palliser's "The Complete Chess Workout: Train your brain with 1200 puzzles". A similar example, which in some ways is better suited for beginning tacticians, would be "Sharpen Your Tactics: 1125 Brilliant Sacrifices, Combinations, and Studies" by Anatoly Lein because is progresses from very simple tactics to more complex one, and does a good job of working on specific themes by just presenting multiple problems on the same theme in close proximity. For more didactic books from category B, many books aimed at a younger audience are good, even if you are an adult. For example "Chess Tactics for Champions: A step-by-step guide to using tactics and combinations the Polgar way" presents tactical themes reasonably, followed by a reasonable number of examples.

All of the above mentioned books are superior to this book. In Chess Tactics from Scratch, The explanations of each theme are long-winded, and the examples are not a good match for the text, in that examples might be quite complex despite the explanation only being needed or appropriate for a novice. Also, while there are plenty of diagrams in each section, many are not really problems to be solved. This essentially punishes readers for trying to solve problems before you read the associated text (and trying to solve diagrams before reading the text is pretty much a universally accepted path to improvement). You might spend a few minutes looking for a solution to what you assume is tactical problem related to pins, fail, and then read the text and see it says something like "in this position, white played 1. Bd3? and fell for the following tactic." Or the diagram may be the starting point to a series of moves, and the pin does not show up until after the fourth move. To be fair, the author warns you at the beginning to just read through the text and not to try to solve the diagrams like problems, but the result of this approach is that there is significantly less problem solving to be done than in most other chess tactics books (which is a critical issue, since actually solving problems is the only real pathway to tactical skill). There is a section of problems at the very end of the book, but the book would be made much stronger by having problems associated with each section AND some problems at the end where the theme is not known.

Overall, this book is far from useless, and an aspiring tournament player may find it helpful. I suspect, however, that as measured by chess improvement per hour, reading any number of other tactics books (including the ones I mention in this review) would help you more.
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