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Designing for Interaction: Creating Smart Applications and Clever Devices (Anglais) Broché – 18 juillet 2006


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Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

Explore the new design discipline that is behind such products as the iPod and innovative Web sites like Flickr. While other books on this subject are either aimed at more seasoned practitioners or else are too focused on a particular medium like software, this guide will take a more holistic approach to the discipline, looking at interaction design for the Web, software, and devices. It is  the only interaction design book that is coming from a designers point of view rather than that of an engineer.

This much-needed guide is more than just a how-to manual. It covers interaction design fundamentals, approaches to designing, design research, and more, and spans all mediums—Internet, software, and devices. Even robots! Filled with tips, real-world projects, and interviews, you’ll get a solid grounding in everything you need to successfully tackle interaction design.

Designing for Interaction is an AIGA Design Press book, published under Peachpit's New Riders imprint in partnership with AIGA.

Biographie de l'auteur

Dan Saffer has worked for the last decade in the digital medium as a webmaster, producer, developer, copywriter, creative lead, information architect, and interaction designer. He is currently a senior interaction designer at Adaptive Path, a leading design consultancy and has designed and built Web sites, devices, and applications for companies as diverse as Tiffany & Co and the World Wrestling Federation. His work has been featured in New York magazine, Entertainment Weekly, and the Chicago Tribune. His Web site and blog can be found at www.odannyboy.com. Dan is a member of the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) and the Industrial Designers Society of America (IDSA) and received his Master of Design in Interaction Design from Carnegie Mellon University, where he also taught interaction design.


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Couverture | Copyright | Table des matières | Extrait | Index | Quatrième de couverture
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Amazon.com: 15 commentaires
80 internautes sur 84 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
ok as an overview, but very poorly written and without references 6 février 2007
Par Antje Looks - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
I was very excited waiting for this book and after reading the reviews I decided to buy it. After reading it, I'm wondering if the reviewers actually read the book??? I spent some time writing this because I would like to see books better written and more useful. This is just my opinion, so read other reviews as well.

*Book direction*
Dan tried to cover too much. After all "interaction" is an extremely broad term and I think it would be much better if the book would focus more on "Interactive Systems Design", the design for interactions in systems and technology. Jesse James Garrett, did an excellent job in his book The Elements of User Experience: User-Centered Design for the Web by focusing it on web applications, although you can extrapolate what you learn there to a more general approach of UX. I believe that if Dan would have done the same, the book would became an excellent book and a reference book.

In my opinion, Saffer could have made this book into a reference book by being the Editor and writing about what he knows best, e.g., craft of Interaction Design (IxD):
- Each chapter could have been written by an expert in that area
- The introduction is very general, with statement that I don't really agree and I felt it is very personal - what Dan things about IxD. I read it all for the safe of being entitled to write this, but I didn't find it useful at all.

*Great*
- The Interviews: they cover very interesting topics and reading them gives a very quick and excellent insights of the topics they cover. (On the other hand, the text in the book repeats the interview points instead of going deeper). You can find the interviews online at [...].
- Organisation: very well organised and structured, which makes it easier to select what you want to read or when you want to go back to a chapter later on.
- The elements of IxD: this is quite interesting and to some extent useful. It misses some more work in the way the examples are used and in how to use these elements.
- Service chapter: this chapter is quite interesting and useful, however I would argue that it would belong to a book about User Experience.
- Very easy to read and not boring (except when you doubt about what he argues).

*Good*
- Putting it all together. The elements, interviews, aspects of good design, craft of IxD, and so forth. Great that a book puts all these together but it's a pity that was done very poorly. I still consider this good because it was a good piece of work Dan did and it will be useful for people staring with IxD. However, I look forward for such kind of book but well written.
- Size of the book: I wish more books were like this. Short and delivers the message. However, the text is not that well written and repeating most of the times what we got by reading the interviews. Instead Saffer could have picked up from the interview and explored the issues in a deeper way.
- Examples: are OK, but when the explanation started to be interesting he stops. Most of the times I felt he explains the obvious but not the design "genius" behind the product.

*Very bad*
- Meaningless text (not all): some explanations don't say more than what you see in the picture or you can read in the interview. The explanations are many times obvious instead of bringing up the design issues behind.
- No references/bibliography: Is Dan a god of IxD?? It seems so. Although he occasional refers to some people or books, there are no references at all. Not even in the end of each chapter. On one hand this makes the text very insecure and at sometimes I almost get the feeling that he is the only one believing on what he says or he is the only one that saw that example. On the other hand, saying that "this is common practice among designers" is not enough, especially when I know situations that are the opposite. In fact I cannot believe that such a book can be published without any references or bibliography. Maybe this book is a novel...
- Service Design: As I said above, I see this chapter rather in a book about User Experience. And the interviews somehow support my opinion by talking about User Experience. Perhaps, I could accept a service design chapter if Dan would have narrowed the services he talks about to more specific interactions. He might argue that Interaction Design is not just about technology but then he should have spent more time in writing the book and perhaps having other people as co-authors. In this early age of IxD it is much better to focus on concrete things, otherwise you risk you neck in talking about things that are actually from other disciplines.
- Some of the examples and explanations. I could almost say they are non-sense, but I think it just misses a bit more work to put the design explanation instead of describing the obvious. I hope I'll have time later on to put some here.

This book, in my opinion, is overrated! The book is good at collecting the arguable "elements for Interaction Design" but it doesn't deliver what the reviews say. You'd be better of by reading the interviews online and perhaps wait for a better book. If you cannot wait, then buy this one but read something else as well so you have a critical eye when reading the book and don't take everything for granted.

I think it would be useful to define and separate: "Interaction Design" and "Interaction Systems Design". The former is too general and the second is what I call what this book says it is "Interaction Design."
I'd recommend About Face 3: The Essentials of Interaction Design and Designing for the Digital Age: How to Create Human-Centered Products and Services (the best books on the topic with details on how-to) and Thoughts on Interaction Design (the best book on explaining Interaction Design, linking theory with practice and with excellent interviews as well as a quick and easy read).
30 internautes sur 33 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Great primer 8 août 2006
Par Andrew Otwell - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Dan's book is an excellent primer on Interaction Design, one I'd reccommend to new and veteran practicioners. Although I've docked it a star for its lack of footnotes or even bibliography, it covers a lot of ground in a very readable way.

I especially like that Dan's avoided the easy path of just pointing out bad design, instead he really analyzes what makes *good* designs work. He's to be applauded, too, for including design approaches besides User-Centered Design. Other books in the field treat UCD as gospel; Dan puts other (and often more pragmatic) approaches on equal footing with UCD, rather than making designers who don't do round after round of usability testing feel guilty about it.

The book's punctuated by a series of interviews, which are fun to read. As another reviewer points out, the inclusion of Service Design, as well as the content in the last chapter (robots, ubiquitous computing, intelligent agents) makes the book timely and provacative.

I do wish "Designing for Interaction" had at least a section "for further reading" or selected bibliography. It's a bit of a dead end as it stands--where could I go to learn more about Service Design, for example? Dan's standing on the shoulders of a lot of other peoples' work here; I'd have liked to see this introductory text lead interested readers on to other books and articles.
46 internautes sur 57 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Useless content, terrible writing 16 avril 2008
Par Shashikant Penumarthy - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
This book reads like the author sat down on a weekend afternoon, typed out a draft and simply published it. The text is basically a sequence of obvious statements. In fact, this book is so bad I don't want to waste many words reviewing it. So I am going to randomly select 4 sentences from this book:

- Most applications and devices that interaction designers design have some sort of visible controls for the user to use to manipulate the features of the product. pg 136
- Designers should be open and nonjudgemental and should not assume that they know the answer beforehand. pg 80
- It is more important now than ever before that our digital tools have the characteristics of good interaction design baked into them. pg 203
- The system needs an assortment of responses to deal with a range of situations. pg 38

Believe me, I haven't chosen these lines consciously - I closed my eyes, turned to some page, put my finger down and typed the sentence my finger landed on. The whole book is filled with such drivel.

I wish I could give this item a rating of zero. Spend your money elsewhere.
7 internautes sur 8 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Not a lot of useful information 14 janvier 2008
Par Benjamin Attar - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
The useful information in this book could be condensed into a 10 page article. The rest of the book is just irrelevant or uninformative photos, self evident ideas, and short interviews with designers. There is knowledge for designers between the covers - but not a bookload. This book tells you how to go about researching for design, but doesn't tell you anything about what other researchers have learned.
If you are looking for a book that helps you decide how to position the controls and labels on your latest widget, this isn't it.
NOT the Second Edition as linked by Amazon 4 avril 2012
Par Abigail Bormann - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle
Boys and girls, do yourself a favor and check which edition you need of this textbook BEFORE you buy it. Amazon did that handy "Kindle edition" link when I searched for the 2nd edition of this book and then lo and behold, a few months later I realize that I've actually purchased the 1st edition on my Kindle and the two are quite different. I learned this after the 7-day return window, however, so now I've payed for this book twice because I was too dumb to check the citation before using that 1-click-buy button.
This edition also does not have actual page numbers in it, which is awful for properly citing it.
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