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Diary of a Lost Girl (Das Tagebuch einer Verlorenen) [Import USA Zone 1]

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Détails sur le produit

  • Acteurs : Josef Rovenský, André Roanne, Louise Brooks, Vera Pawlowa, Franziska Kinz
  • Réalisateurs : Georg Wilhelm Pabst
  • Format : Noir et blanc, Muet, NTSC, Import
  • Audio : Anglais (Dolby Digital 2.0 Stéréo), Japonais
  • Région : Région 1 (USA et Canada). Ce DVD ne pourra probablement pas être visualisé en Europe. Plus d'informations sur les formats DVD/Blu-ray.
  • Rapport de forme : 1.33:1
  • Nombre de disques : 1
  • Studio : Kino Video
  • Date de sortie du DVD : 13 novembre 2001
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 5.0 étoiles sur 5 4 commentaires client
  • ASIN: B00005QW58
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 140.840 en DVD & Blu-ray (Voir les 100 premiers en DVD & Blu-ray)
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Descriptions du produit

A masterwork of the German Silent Cinema whose reputation has only increased over time, Diary of a Lost Girl (Tagebuch einer Verlorenen) traces the journey of a young woman from the pit of despair to the moment of personal awakening. Directed with virtuoso flair by the great G. W. Pabst, Diary of a Lost Girl represents the final pairing of the filmmaker with screen icon Louise Brooks, mere months after their first collaboration in the now-legendary Pandoras Box (Die Büchse der Pandora). Brooks plays Thymiane Henning, an unprepossessing young woman seduced by an unscrupulous and mercenary character employed at her fathers pharmacy (played with gusto by Fritz Rasp, the degenerate villain of such Fritz Lang classics as Metropolis, Spione, and Frau im mond). After Thymiane gives birth to the child and subsequently rejects her familys expectations for marriage, the baby is stripped from her care, and Thymiane is relegated to a purgatorial reform school that functions less as an educational institution and more like a conduit for fulfilling the headmistress's sadistic libidinal fantasies. When Thymiane at last manages to escape and learn the fate of her child, she despondently enters a brothel where she nonetheless flourishes emotionally and sexually, and life begins anew. --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition DVD.

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Format: DVD
Black and white silent movie with English subtitles. Sound track relevant to the story. Original title "Tagebuch einer Verlorenen"

Thymiane (Louise Brooks) not aware of the relationship her father had with another of his housekeepers Elisabeth (Sybille Schmitz); she is confused as to why the housekeeper had to leave and ultimately why the housekeeper committed suicide. The pharmacist Meinert (Fritz Rasp) downstairs is more than willing to show her what happens when one gets too friendly and does so when Thymiane faints.

This results in an offspring. The father pays the pharmacist's debt in exchange for making an honest woman of Thymiane. However she reneges and holds out for love; naturally this is unacceptable so she and her diary are sent off to a correctional institute for lost girls. Her offspring is handed over to a midwife.

Will her father come to his senses or is he falling prey to his latest housekeeper Meta (Franziska Kinz?)
Will she break out of the oppressive institute or just learn evil ways?
Will her old friend Count Nicolas Osdorff (André Roanne) come to her rescue?
Or will he have problems of his own when he is out cast?

We find ourselves sitting on the edge of our seats, kibitzing even if we saw the movie before.

We are reminded that with a little more love no one on this earth has to be lost.

Pandora's Box - Criterion Collection
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Format: DVD
Thymiane (Louise Brooks) not aware of the relationship her father had with another of his housekeepers Elisabeth (Sybille Schmitz); she is confused as to why the housekeeper had to leave and ultimately why the housekeeper committed suicide. The pharmacist Meinert (Fritz Rasp) downstairs is more than willing to show her what happens when one gets too friendly and does so when Thymiane faints.

This results in an offspring. The father pays the pharmacist's debt in exchange for making an honest woman of Thymiane. However she reneges and holds out for love; naturally this is unacceptable so she and her diary are sent off to a correctional institute for lost girls. Her offspring is handed over to a midwife.

Will her father come to his senses or is he falling pray to his latest housekeeper Meta (Franziska Kinz?)
Will she break out of the oppressive institute or just learn evil ways?
Will her old friend Count Nicolas Osdorff (André Roanne) come to her rescue?
Or will he have problems of his own when he is out cast?

We find our selves sitting on the edge of our seats, kibitzing even if we saw the movie before.

We are reminded that with a little more love no one on this earth has to be lost.

Pandora's Box - Criterion Collection
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Par oumebaba TOP 1000 COMMENTATEURS le 23 mars 2015
Format: DVD
Superbe édition récente [ Blu-ray + DVD + livret ] pour ce chef d'oeuvre indémodable, nous gratifiant d'une image à la fois robuste et alerte et dont les scories du temps ne nuisent en rien à la lisibilité de l'ensemble; la partition musicale est parfaitement adaptée et d'une grande qualité technique. Le visionnage de ce film dans cette édition est en somme des plus agréables sans jamais sombrer dans la fadeur tant visuelle que sonore: un sentiment d'équilibre règne imperturbable (Tout ceci s'adresse naturellement au Blu-ray mais le DVD demeure très convenable).
Pour l'amoureux du film, incontournable!

[à noter qu'il est judicieux de conserver (voire même d'acquérir) l'ancien DVD Kino import US qui permet d'appréhender ce film de manière plus dramatique, sa bande sonore étant nettement plus sombre et 'typée': parenthèse simplement pour les passionnés]
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Format: DVD Achat vérifié
c'est un superbe film, avec beaucoup d'ambiance, même si techniquement certains raccords de scenes laissent un peu à désirer. Louise Brooks est très touchante dans sa fragilité.
Pour moi, un chef doeuvre.
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Amazon.com: HASH(0x9910f234) étoiles sur 5 51 commentaires
118 internautes sur 121 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x98b482e8) étoiles sur 5 Review of 2015 Kino Blu-ray, 2001 Kino DVD, 1990 Kino VHS 21 novembre 2001
Par keviny01 - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: DVD Achat vérifié
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*** REVIEW UPDATED OCT-22-2015 ***

A young girl goes through various trials of womanhood in this 1929 German silent classic "Diary of a Lost Girl", directed by the great G. W. Pabst, who often made sympathetic films about the plight of women. Like his 1925 classic "The Joyless Street" (see my July 5, 2013 review of an overseas DVD edition), this film is an indictment of immorality and cruelty in European bourgeois society at the time. American actress Louise Brooks plays the title character, who goes from a chaste teenager, to an out-of-wedlock mother, a reform school escapee, a prostitute, and a countess. Although Brooks will always be most famous for playing the iconic Lulu in her previous film with Pabst, "Pandora's Box" (Criterion DVD is currently out of circulation but a new edition is in the works), "Diary of a Lost Girl" gives her a tremendous character arc to show her acting talent. Like other great films of its time, "Diary" suffered censorship and cuts that resulted in lost footage. Several restorations have been done in the past, and a near-complete version has been made with prints from various sources. The Kino Blu-ray I'm reviewing (ASIN: B013CG19D0) now represents the latest restoration.

I am quite pleased with the Kino Blu-ray. Both the film itself and the 1931 sound short "Windy Riley Goes Hollywood" (in which Brooks has a speaking part) are presented in HD. Even though the print quality of "Diary" is far from pristine, with quite a few print damages, skipped frames, and shots of poor visual quality due to inferior print elements, the picture quality as shown on the Blu-ray is still a big improvement over the 2001 Kino DVD (ASIN: B00005QW58). Blu-ray's high definition enables plenty of film grain to be shown. For some, grain should be digitally removed, but for others, it should be retained in its full glory, and I belong to the latter group. The "Windy Rily" sound short, however, is from the same inferior-looking and sounding print as that on the old DVD, without subtitles nor closed captioning.

Also noteworthy for me is that the Blu-ray's running speed is quite a bit faster than that on the 2001 Kino DVD. The Blu-ray runs 109 minutes, excluding credits, and the old DVD runs 114 minutes, excluding credits. With the Blu-ray's 4% higher speed, the film plays better, in my opinion, with actors' movement looking more natural and the pacing seeming more right. The music accompaniment, an effective piano solo by Javier Pérez de Azpeitia, also seems faster paced as well, and for the better too.

The Kino Blu-ray inexplicably shows the film in 1.28:1 aspect ratio, resulting in the picture slightly vertically "stretched". By comparison, other video editions, including the 2001 Kino DVD and a recent British Blu-ray edition, show it in 1.33:1, thus looking more correct. To be fair, the stretched image on the Kino Blu-ray is not as severe as, for instance, that on Criterion's recent "Dressed to Kill" Blu-ray (a problem that has since been fixed). In fact, I have to admit it did not bother me very much in my viewing.

The latest restoration of "Diary" was done by European restoration companies, and they used reconstructed German inter-titles for the restored film's worldwide release. Kino's Blu-ray presents the same inter-titles, with optional white English subtitles that occasionally overlap with the white, rather large German titles. Kino's old DVD, however, uses English inter-titles.

The Kino Blu-ray comes with an excellent full-length audio commentary by Thomas Gladysz, the director of the Louise Brooks Society, which is an online info archive devoted to Brooks. Unfortunately, there are many long stretches of silence during the commentary. Gladysz talks about the actors and crew, the film's artistry, the historical background, and the social climate at the time the movie was made. At one point, he recommends that we check out a documentary on the life of one of the minor actors in the movie, Kurt Gerron (who plays the portly, friendly figure of the brothel), but didn't mention the title of the documentary. That film is the 2002 Oscar-nominated feature documentary "Prisoner of Paradise", about Gerron's life and career that were cut short by the Nazis.

Kino's Blu-ray cover sheet is also reversible, showing the yellow cover design that is similar to the one used on the British Blu-ray/DVD edition by Eureka.

Other than the aforementioned speed difference between the Kino Blu-ray and the old Kino DVD, the two editions present the same cut of the film in terms of footage. The 1990 Kino VHS tape, however, uses plenty of alternate footage that came from various editions of the film. Below is my original 2001 review that compares such differences.

*** ORIGINAL 2001 REVIEW OF THE 2001 KINO DVD AND 1990 KINO VHS ***

This new Kino DVD version of DIARY OF A LOST GIRL contains footage that has been added, re-edited, and even RE-SHOT, compared to Kino's 1990 VHS version.

I did a side-by-side comparison of the DVD and the 1990 VHS tape version and found that director G.W. Pabst had apparently shot two versions of some scenes -- one version being used on the 1990 VHS version, another on this DVD. Most of the differences are minute, such as actors standing on slightly different spots or posing or gesturing a little differently. For instance, at time 00:02:39 on the DVD, Thymian (Louise Brooks) is standing at the doorway with her arms bent. But in the 1990 VHS version, the same shot shows that her arms are straight. At time 00:03:43 of the DVD, Thymian bends forward (toward camera) to pick something up on the floor. In the 1990 VHS version, she bends sideways (to viewer's right) to pick it up. A few re-shot scenes, however, have more drastic differences, with the tone and mood of the scene altered considerably. At 00:04:50, Meinert raises his eyebrows and nods at Thymian, who returns a flirtatious smile. In the 1990 VHS version, however, Meinert only smiles softly, and Thymian's expression is more restrained. At 00:07:52 of the DVD, after Thymian sees what Meinert wrote in her diary, she turns her head slowly and stares incredulously at Meinert for a moment, then locks her diary. In the 1990 VHS version, she simply locks her diary and never looks at Meinert.

Kino emailed me a list of about 80 differences between the 1990 VHS version (which they call the "English version") and the new DVD version (which they call the "German version"). The list reveals there are actually some scenes on the 1990 VHS version that are not on this DVD. Regarding the re-shot scenes, the list is apparently not inclusive, for I've personally noticed a lot more re-shot footage on the DVD. For instance, the sequence in which Elizabeth the housekeeper begs Mr. Henning to let her stay but finally she has to leave is composed entirely of re-shot footage. (Note how amazing it is that these actors were able to give the same great performances twice! But since the two versions are nearly identical, one wonders why Pabst would bother re-shooting at all.)

And I haven't begun to mention the newly added footage -- scenes not on the 1990 VHS version at all, but on this DVD. The new scenes are sprinkled throughout the DVD, resulting in about 9 minutes of material, some of which quite startling. One shows the guard in the reformatory, after catching Erika putting on her makeup, uses her lipstick to write on his note book, "Punish Erika"; then he draws a heart shape next to it, revealing to us what he exactly means by "punish". Another rather risque scene shows Thymian in the brothel performing some gymnastics in a swimsuit in front of her clients.

The new DVD, which Kino calls the "German version", still uses English title cards. Their wordings and placements have been significantly changed compared to the 1990 VHS version. The differences in placements, of course, have resulted in the film being edited differently. Some title cards now have more explicit, even risque, wordings. One reads, "So you have had your way with the housekeeper too," alluding to the unspoken relation between Mr. Henning and Elizabeth. In the scene where Meinert tries to seduce Thymian, the title card shows him saying, "I'll tell you all about Elizabeth tonight, Thymian. BIG Thymian." The DVD has one incorrect title card. It shows what Meinert wrote in Thymian's diary to be "Meet me 11:30 tonight." The time should read 10:30, as indicated by a later shot of a clock. The 1990 VHS version does have the correct time on the title card.

The score used on the 1990 VHS version is a mixed bag of violin solo, piano solo, jazz, and classical orchestration. The DVD has a more elaborate orchestration for the score. The old score is not included on this DVD.

The video transfer of the DVD came from new source material and it looks much less battered, sharper, more detailed, and better contrasted than that of the 1990 VHS version. Still, the improved picture of the DVD is nowhere near the sparkling image quality of, say, the Criterion DVD version of HAXAN or THE PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC.

The DVD also includes a rarely-seen sound film that stars Brooks, titled WINDY RILEY GOES HOLLYWOOD. The sound era was believed to have ended Brooks' acting career. But in this film, her voice sounds just fine to me. The video transfer of this 18-minute 1930 comedy film has a heavily-battered picture transfer and a very hissy soundtrack (not many prints of this film exist, we are told). And there are no subtitles or closed captioning. But all the dialogs register pretty clearly. This short film is available only on the DVD version, not on the 2001 VHS version (which is not to be confused with the out-of-print 1990 VHS version that I referred to throughout this review).
36 internautes sur 36 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x98b42d20) étoiles sur 5 Oh boy!!!! 28 octobre 2001
Par Ed N - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: DVD Achat vérifié
WOW!!! I never in my wildest dreams thought this silent film classic starring Louise Brooks was coming to DVD! I thought for sure Pandora's Box (Ms. Brooks' most famous film) would come first. And furthermore, I thought Criterion would be the company to release the film, but it looks like Kino's will have the honor. That's not bad, either - Kino's has a LOT of good foreign/silent/independent films, and I've always liked their VCR tapes, so I'm looking forward eagerly to Diary of a Lost Girl.
For those not in the know, Louise Brooks was the ultimate flapper girl of the 1920s. She was probably more famous for her haircut, beauty, and lifestyle than her films. But her film legacy is firmly established by two German films she made after leaving Hollywood briefly - Pandora's Box and Diary of a Lost Girl, both by G.W. Pabst (one of the legendary silent film directors). Both films, if you can find them, are absolute classics. The German expressionist style has rarely been more beautifully captured than in Pandora's Box (Hitchcock used this style too in a lot of his early black/white films). And I was lucky enough to find a beat-up VHS copy of Diary. If you like silent films, you can't go wrong with this film either! The imagery is stunning, Louise Brooks looks gorgeous and gives a moving performance a young lady who, having lost her virtue, is consequently shunned by society and has to learn to care for herself. I don't like to give away plots, so that's all I'll say, but I am looking forward to owning this film on DVD! Highly recommended!
42 internautes sur 45 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x98fc7024) étoiles sur 5 Not the best entry in the Brooksie Diary! 21 mai 2006
Par Robert Badgley - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: DVD
I am giving this most recent version on DVD of the Pabst/Brooks collaboration 'Diary of a Lost Girl' just three stars.

Like their previous effort 'Pandora's Box',this film will never be shown in its' complete form.Both were butchered by censors in Germany,Europe and in North America for their "explicit" content and to make it more palatable for the particular countries' audiences.

I have personally seen over the years about six different versions of this film and all have subtle differences or complete ommissions.This is the most comprehensive version but it does have its' differences both subtle and major.

One major piece returned to the film is a scene on the beach where the customer who first 'took' Louise as a brothel employee,now returns asking if she remembers him.It's nice to see it there but because of the previous cuts to this film it does nothing to advance the plot and could easily have stayed out.

Throughout the film there are a few scenes I have noticed,like the previous reviewer,that have alternate takes inserted that differ with the /90 VHS version.Furthermore there are also scenes which the VHS version does have and this DVD version does NOT have.An example is the "lottery" scene where Louise is being auctioned off in the nightclub.In the VHS version there are two cuts to the reaction of the his father,wife and assistant.The most telling and important of the two showing his wife smirking at Louise has been ommitted from the new DVD version.VERY unfortunate as it does so much,among other things,to emphasize Louises' hurt and abondonment.

Another scene reinserted in this new version is the dancing lesson scene.The "restorers" in Europe refer through sub-titles that Louise is teaching dancing at the brothel where she now is staying.This is her attempt to earn a living "legitmately".I have seen this scene before but it was never referred specifically to as dancing.In fact I have always considered that she is giving exercise lessons NOT dancing lessons.She comes into the room with a small "drum" and stick(no phonograph or radio in sight),she takes off her robe to reveal anything but a dance outfit,the patron starts knee squatting as he lasciviously eyes Louise,then Louise proceeds to do upper body bends.No dancing takes place here.Pabst knew of Louise's dancing abilities of course which were used to good effect elsewhere in the movie but here I think this is just supposition and a liberty taken on the part of the restorers of this new version that had them put "dancing" into the titles instead of what it really was.

Another point of contention I have is the inter-titles or sub-titling.There are some that have been repeated from the VHS version but others newly inserted that have been,as far as I can tell,newly created.For example and in keeping with the lottery scene,there is a moment where Louise makes eye contact with her father.The shame on his face is mirrored by the shame on Louises' face who starts to cry.As a topper to this poignant moment Dr.Vitalis who has lost in his bid in the lottery to Count Osdorff starts to cry.After a moment Louise looks away to see the Doctors' face,another one who needs consoling but about whom she can do very little but offer an empathetic glance.It is a great scene and one in which I've never seen a sub title but this new version gets one from the doctor who tells her not only is she now lost but they all are.This scene has always stood on it's own and this sub-title is totally inappropriate,it simply does NOT need one!

Another criticism is the music.I would have liked to have seen a new orchestral score but it is my oppinion the music of the VHS version and the appropriate mood and lift it provided was much better suited to the film than this electronic driven score that at times detracts from the picture totally and spoils it.

Lastly is the inclusion in both the VHS version and this new one of the two ladies at the beach who come upon Louises' step uncle and her.She calls to the uncle "Cousin Osdorff".Again until I saw the VHS version this card showed her calling his real name.The versions I have known previously refer to this woman and the one with her as two acquaintances of his who do charity work and who then ask for Louises' help in their cause.Here we have them as related and the one lady asking if she can "help care for" her.Why would she need "caring" for by anyone as she is obviously being cared for quite well by her step uncle? If this is the real original sub-title(which I doubt unless proven otherwise)then some important footage is missing here.

Technically this new DVD version,new footage aside,has a much better contrast than others I have seen previously and is clearer but it still has some major blemishes throughout(some VERY distracting) and I thought it should have received a little better treatment than it got.

In conclusion I would say this new DVD version is mostly unsatisfying.We are given new footage which fleshes out alot of areas but some footage(though minor) has disappeared.Also the sub titles(which for the most part are intact from previous versions)have some newly added ones which are not appropriate/accurate and some that should have been excised altogether.Also the music does nothing for this version at all.It's all done cheaply on an electronic keyboard and I think the scorer was at times looking at an entirely different picture.

Though we will never see a truly "complete" 'Diary',it is my oppinion that the VHS version(for all its' flaws) is the best so far.It comes closest to the the mood and spirit that Pabst intended.
23 internautes sur 23 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x98b5693c) étoiles sur 5 Beauty & The Beasts 2 novembre 2011
Par JE Farrow - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Louise Brooks had a reputation for being "difficult" to work with, but you'd never know it when you see this extraordinarily gorgeous woman cast her magic on film. A lot of people may say, "A silent film? Aren't they kind of boring?" If you want to change that attitude, induce them to watch any of the very few Louise Brooks' films--particularly this one--to change their view. DIARY OF A LOST GIRL is completely modern in subject matter, direction & acting style.

There is little I can add that the other reviwers haven't covered. The title could have been DIARY OF A FALLEN WOMAN, but I like "Lost." However, neither term applies to Brooks' character who was betrayed by the men in her life at an early age. She is sent to a "reformator" a la Magdalene Sisters) after being raped & subsequently made pregnant by her father's handsome but cheesy business partner. The reformatory with its grotesque male director & mannish "dorm mistress" is a chilling glimpse into reactionary mores & twisted sexism. This is just the beginning of a truly epic exploration of a woman who learns to define herself despite the social realities that try to drag her down. However, this is not a morose or depressing story--because throughout her ordeals, Louise Brooks projects a positive image. She shows compassion even to the people who have tried to destroy her. She eventually finds her role in society with grace & sensitivity.

This is not a tear-jerker, rather it is a brilliant affirmation of life. For people who've never seen a silent film, this is a good place to start because DIARY OF A LOST GIRL is both beautiful, engaging & very relevant.
11 internautes sur 11 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x98b34b40) étoiles sur 5 Bittersweet and tragic 13 février 2003
Par Emiliano Moreno - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: DVD
"Diary of a Lost Girl" (1929) shows us Louise Brooks at her best. It is the bittersweet tale of a young girl's loss of innocence. The new score by Joseph Turrin truly matches this sentimental film by G.W. Pabst , his second best known silent feature after "Pandora's Box" (1928). There are various close ups of Brooks which demonstrate that she was not only a talented actress, but a true vision of beauty. Her face is absolutely flawless. Buy this movie today on DVD, you will not regret it. The DVD also contains the eighteen minute movie short, " Windy Riley Goes to Hollywood", where one can hear Louise Brooks talk! This was directed by Roscoe " Fatty" Arbuckle under an assumed name.Arbuckle's life and career were devasted by a scandal in the early 1920's, he died not long after making this film short.
Also highly recommended is of course, "Pandora's Box" also starring the lovely Louise Brooks.
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