undrgrnd Cliquez ici Baby KDP nav-sa-clothing-shoes nav-sa-clothing-shoes Cloud Drive Photos Beauty Cliquez ici Acheter Fire Acheter Kindle Paperwhite cliquez_ici Jeux Vidéo Gifts

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil


Essai gratuit

Découvrez gratuitement un extrait de ce titre

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Désolé, cet article n'est pas disponible en
Image non disponible pour la
couleur :
Image non disponible

Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain: The Definitive, 4th Edition [Format Kindle]

Betty Edwards
4.5 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (4 commentaires client)

Prix éditeur - format imprimé : EUR 19,78
Prix Kindle : EUR 13,08 TTC & envoi gratuit via réseau sans fil par Amazon Whispernet
Économisez : EUR 6,70 (34%)

App de lecture Kindle gratuite Tout le monde peut lire les livres Kindle, même sans un appareil Kindle, grâce à l'appli Kindle GRATUITE pour les smartphones, les tablettes et les ordinateurs.

Pour obtenir l'appli gratuite, saisissez votre adresse e-mail ou numéro de téléphone mobile.


Prix Amazon Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle avec audio/vidéo EUR 12,45  
Format Kindle, 26 avril 2012 EUR 13,08  
Relié EUR 29,03  
Broché EUR 19,63  

Idée cadeau Noël : Retrouvez toutes les idées cadeaux Livres dans notre Boutique Livres de Noël .

Les clients ayant acheté cet article ont également acheté

Cette fonction d'achat continuera à charger les articles. Pour naviguer hors de ce carrousel, veuillez utiliser votre touche de raccourci d'en-tête pour naviguer vers l'en-tête précédente ou suivante.

Descriptions du produit



Drawing used to be a civilized thing to do, like reading and writing. It was taught in elementary schools. It was democratic. It was a boon to happiness.

—Michael Kimmelman

For more than thirty years, Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain has been a work in progress. Since the original publication in 1979, I have revised the book three times, with each revision about a decade apart: the ?rst in 1989, the second, 1999, and now a third, 2012 version. In each revision, my main purpose has been to incorporate instructional improvements that my group of teachers and I had gleaned from continuously teaching drawing over the intervening years, as well as bringing up-to-date ideas and information from education and neuroscience that relate to drawing. As you will see in this new version, much of the original material remains, as it has passed the test of time, while I continue to re?ne the lessons and clarify instructions. In addition, I make some new points about emergent right-brain signi?cance and the astonishing, relatively new science called neuroplasticity. I make a case for my life’s goal, the possibility that public schools will once again teach drawing, not only as a civilized thing to do and a boon to happiness, but also as perceptual training for improving creative thinking.

The power of perception

Many of my readers have intuitively understood that this book is not only about learning to draw, and it is certainly not about Art with a capital A. The true subject is perception. Yes, the lessons have helped many people attain the basic ability to draw, and that is a main purpose of the book. But the larger underlying purpose was always to bring right hemisphere functions into focus and to teach readers how to see in new ways, with hopes that they would discover how to transfer perceptual skills to thinking and problem solving. In education, this is called “transfer of learning,” which has always been regarded as di?cult to teach, and often teachers, myself included, hope that it will just happen. Transfer of learning, however, is best accomplished by direct teaching, and therefore, in Chapter 11 of this revised edition, I encourage that transfer by including some direct instruction on how perceptual skills, learned through drawing, can be used for thinking and problem solving in other ?elds.

The book’s drawing exercises are truly on a basic level, intended for a beginner in drawing. The course is designed for persons who cannot draw at all, who feel that they have no talent for drawing, and who believe that they probably can never learn to draw. Over the years, I have said many times that the lessons in this book are not on the level of art, but are rather more like learning how to read—more like the ABCs of reading: learning the alphabet, phonics, syllabi?cation, vocabulary, and so on. And just as learning basic reading is a vitally important goal, because the skills of reading transfer to every other kind of learning, from math and science to philosophy and astronomy, I believe that in time learning to draw will emerge as an equally vital skill, one that provides equally transferrable powers of perception to guide and promote insight into the meaning of visual and verbal information. I will even go out on a limb and say that we mistakenly may have been putting all our educational eggs into one basket only, while shortchanging other truly valuable capabilities of the human brain, namely perception, intuition, imagination, and creativity. Perhaps Albert Einstein put it best: “The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift.”

The hidden content

About six months after publication of the original book in 1979, I had the odd experience of suddenly realizing that the book I thought I had written contained another content of which I was unaware. That hidden content was something I didn’t know I knew: I had inadvertently de?ned the basic component skills of the global skill of drawing. I think part of the reason this content was hidden from me was the very nature of art education at the time, where beginning drawing classes focused on subject matter, such as “Still Life Drawing,” “Landscape Drawing,” or “Figure Drawing,” or on drawing mediums, such as charcoal, pencil, pen and ink, ink wash, or mixtures of mediums.

But my aim was di?erent: I needed to provide my readers with exercises that would cause a cognitive shift to the right hemisphere—a shift similar to that caused by Upside-Down Drawing: “tricking” the dominant left hemisphere into dropping out of the task. I settled on ?ve subskills that seemed to have the same e?ect, but at the time, I thought that there must be other basic skills—maybe dozens of them.

Then, months after the book had been published, in the midst of teaching a class, it hit me as an aha! that for learning to draw realistic images of observed subjects, the ?ve subskills were it—there weren’t more. I had inadvertently selected from the many aspects of drawing a few fundamental subskills that I thought might be closely aligned to the e?ect of Upside-Down Drawing. And the ?ve skills, I realized, were not drawing skills in the usual sense; they were rock-bottom, fundamental seeing skills: how to perceive edges, spaces, relationship, lights and shadows, and the gestalt. As with the ABCs of reading, these were the skills you had to have in order to draw any subject.

I was elated by this discovery. I discussed it at length with my colleagues and searched through old and new textbooks on drawing, but we did not ?nd any additional fundamental basic components of the global skill of basic realistic drawing—drawing one’s perceptions. With this discovery, it occurred to me that perhaps drawing could be quickly and easily taught and learned— not strung out over years and years, as was the current practice in art schools. My aim suddenly became “drawing for everyone,” not just for artists in training. Clearly, the basic ability to draw does not necessarily lead to the “?ne art” found in museums and galleries any more than the basic ability to read and write inevitably leads to literary greatness and published works of literature. But learning to draw was something I knew was valued by children and adults. Thus, my discovery led me in new directions, resulting in a 1989 revision of Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain, in which I focused on explaining my insight and proposing that individuals who had never been able to draw could learn to draw well very rapidly.

Subsequently, my colleagues and I developed a five-day workshop of forty hours of teaching and learning (eight hours a day for ?ve days), which proved to be surprisingly e?ective: students acquired quite high-level basic drawing skills in that brief time, and gained all the information they needed to go on making progress in drawing. Since drawing perceived subjects is always the same task, always requiring the ?ve basic component skills, they could proceed to any subject matter, learn to use any or all drawing mediums, and take the skill as far as they wished. They could also apply their new visual skills to thinking. The parallels to learning to read were becoming obvious.

Over the next decade, from 1989 to 1999, the connection of perceptual skills to general thinking, problem solving, and creativity became a more central focus for me, especially after publication of my 1986 book, Drawing on the Artist Within. In this

book, I proposed a “written” language for the right hemisphere: the language of line, the expressive language of art itself. This idea of using drawing to aid thinking proved to be quite useful in a class on creativity that I developed for university students and in small corporate seminars on problem solving.

Then, in 1999, I again revised Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain, again incorporating what we had learned over the years of teaching the ?ve basic skills and re?ning the lessons. I especially focused on the skill of sighting (proportion and perspective), which is perhaps the most di?cult component skill to teach in words, because of its complexity and its reliance on students’ acceptance of paradox, always anathema to the logical, concept-bound left brain. In addition, I urged using perceptual skills to “see” problems.

Now, with this third revision in 2012, I want to clarify to the best of my ability the global nature of drawing and to link drawing’s basic component skills to thinking in general and to creativity in particular. Throughout many cultures, both in the United States and worldwide, there is much talk of creativity and our need for innovation and invention. There are many suggestions to try this or try that. But the nitty-gritty of precisely how to become more creative is seriously lacking. Our education system seems bent on eliminating every last bit of creative perceptual training of the right side of the brain, while overemphasizing the skills best accomplished by the left side of the brain: memorizing dates, data, theorems, and events with the goal of passing standardized tests. Today we are not only testing and grading our children into the ground, but we are not teaching them how to see and understand the deep meaning of what they learn, or to perceive the connectedness of information about the world. It is indeed time to try something di?erent.

Fortunately, the tide seems to be turning, according to a recent news report. A small group of cognitive scientists at the University of California at Los Angeles is recommending they call “perceptual learning” as a remedy to our failing educational practices. They express hope that such training will transfer to other c...

Revue de presse

2013 Nautilus Books for a Better World Silver winner as Best Creative Process Book

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 21766 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 320 pages
  • Editeur : Tarcher; Édition : 4 (26 avril 2012)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B005GSYXU4
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Activé
  • Composition améliorée: Non activé
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 4.5 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (4 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°91.086 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)

Quels sont les autres articles que les clients achètent après avoir regardé cet article?

Commentaires en ligne

4 étoiles
2 étoiles
1 étoiles
4.5 étoiles sur 5
4.5 étoiles sur 5
Commentaires client les plus utiles
2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Very good but could have been write simplier. 18 novembre 2012
Par juliette
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Désolé pour le commentaire en français, mais mon anglais est un peu limité. J'aurais d'ailleurs dû chercher ce livre en français; mais bon, le langage simple est à la portée de tout le monde. Par contre, je trouve l'introduction trop longue; plus succinct, ce livre aurait été plus agréable, il tombe un peu des mains pour énoncer des choses pas forcément utiles.
Il raconte de façon bien compliquée ce que j'expliquais simplement dans mes cours en disant qu'il fallait oublier ce que l'on connait des choses et se fier seulement à ce que l'on voit. Oublier "je dessine un oeil" pour se dire "je reporte cette forme sombre sur le papier", même si elle court de l'oeil au nez.
voilà. Beaucoup de pages pour dire ça avec des explications pseudo scientifiques longuettes et laborieuses.
Pour autant, dans le fond, je conseil vivement ce livre à tout le monde vu qu'il prône une façon de regarder les choses qui est la base même du dessin.
Pas de grandes découvertes pour autant malgré les effets d'annonce.
Je connaissais déjà les exercices proposés, mais ce livre peut toutefois servir de structure pour quelqu'un par exemple voulant mettre en place un stage. Pas sûre qu'il soit utilisable pour une formation en autodidacte très efficace; il aurait fallu plus d'exercices.
Voilà; je recommande, car c'est tout de même un très bon bouquin parlant de ce qu'il y a le plus important dans le dessin; la perception, ce qui n'est que rarement mis en avant.
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
Signaler un abus
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Worth It 6 avril 2013
Par Galaad
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Si vous avez aimer la version française... celle là viens ajouter quelques dessins en plus, et d'autres analyser et détails issues des dernières découvertes de Betty Edwards... Si vous utilisez son livre souvent et que vous y revenez de manière régulière alors cet achat est à faire les yeux fermés... Sinon restez à la troisième édition.
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
Signaler un abus
5.0 étoiles sur 5 one of the bibles of drawing! 6 novembre 2014
Par M. Teles
very interesting! for a art lover to have it on his shelf, the ABC of learning to draw... worth the price
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
Signaler un abus
1 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Ideal pour apprendre 28 mars 2013
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Produit neuf arrivée en excelentes conditions
Ideal pour s'initier au dessin à n'importe quel age même si on se croit pas doué.
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
Signaler un abus
Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.7 étoiles sur 5  528 commentaires
251 internautes sur 263 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Unlocking your creative abilities. 11 février 2005
Par Inkwell - Publié sur Amazon.com
I bought this book years ago, and it taught me how to dramatically improve my drawing skills.

I believe people who are blocked from drawing well will get the most from this book. More accomplished artists may benefit as well by understanding better how the process works.

It shows you how to look at things differently, and uses different techniques to enable you to bypass your left (logical) brain, and access your right brain, (your subconscious mind), hence the title.

Instead of using left brain- right brain theory to describe this, in my view the more correct description would be to learn to access your subconscious mind which functions at a deeper level, while reducing the way in which your conscious mind interferes with the creative process.

Your brain has four levels of consciousness, beta which is normal waking state, alpha which is a relaxed meditative state such as when you are about to go to sleep, theta which is a deeper state associated with creativity and light sleep, and delta which is deep sleep.

Normally, your brain shows shows some activity at all these levels. Artists and other creative people are able to access the creative mental state more easily.

Here is an example of how the process works.

If you try to draw a chair you may have a definite idea in your logical mind of how a chair should be, so when you draw you are thinking 4 legs, a seat and a back. You know all the legs are the same length, and therefore you may draw that way.

This can interfere with you doing a good drawing, because each leg from an artistic viewpoint is longer or shorter depending on the distance from your eye, so you have to learn how to use your vision to see it differently.

This can interfere with you doing a good drawing, because each leg from an artistic viewpoint is longer or shorter depending on the distance from your eye, so you have to learn how to use your imagination instead.

In this book there is a picture of something such as a chair or a person's face, and you may draw it as it is. You can also use a picture from a newspaper or magazine. This represents your current skill level.

Now, turn the picture upside down and draw the picture upside down. As you do this drawing, you may notice that you are producing a more accurate copy of the picture. This is because you are now using different skills. I was amazed at the results. This is so simple to do. Try it yourself and discover how easy it is.

There are other examples and illustrations to show you how to see pictures differently, and use space, light and shade, optical illusions and so forth.

As you become more experienced you will learn how to use your new skills automatically. I particularly enjoyed using pictures of movie stars, turning them upside down, copying them, and then doing it again right side up.

I have referred several people who would love to draw well to this book. If you are not as artistic as you would like to be, and were to follow the exercises in this book there is no reason your skill level should not improve dramatically. Naturally, the more you practice, the more you improve. If it worked for me, it can work for you. This is pretty easy.

Imagine drawing anything you want to draw completely accurately, and with incredible detail, subtlety and nuance just like a professional artist. This potential is just a few clicks away. If it worked for me, it can work for you, as my natural drawing was ability not good.
156 internautes sur 163 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
2.0 étoiles sur 5 This 4th edition is a disappointment. 14 février 2013
Par Alyce Humphrey - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
The '89 edition is far superior to the 4th. In the 4th, the paper is thin enough to see through. Many of the drawing instructions are reproduced far too light and hard to see, much less to study. The chapter on color is GONE. Most of the interesting and informative margin notes are gone (though the space is still there), and the few that are there are in print so tiny it's not easy to read. In chapter 6, the student is advised to lift lights to create shadows, but this is not really taught until chapter 10 on lights and shadows. Why is this thrust on the student in chapter 6 when they haven't been taught it yet and may end up doing it in an incorrect way? And last, the index is incomplete, and I had to go through many pages in order to find things, since all the pages for a subject were not listed. The '89 edition is excellent.
123 internautes sur 131 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 This book will improve your drawing immensely! 16 juin 2004
Par J. Danielson - Publié sur Amazon.com
I read this book, and later took a course based on this book. In fact, the book was really all I needed. For anyone who thinks drawing is a talent you have to be born with-check out the drawings by Van Gogh included in this book. It seems Vincent was in despair and was going to give up art, until he read a book on drawing (but not this one!). The author gives a before and after example of Van Gogh drawings. The difference was amazing, and clearly shows that drawing is a skill you can learn, no matter how inept your drawing is at first. Do the tasks in this book, and while you may not draw as well as Vincent (or you may), you will be pleased with the improvement you make.
80 internautes sur 84 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Amazing! 27 juillet 2004
Par Cori - Publié sur Amazon.com
I have always considered myself to be an artist who couldn't draw. I work as a graphic and multimedia designer and I am an avid watercolourist - but to pick up a pencil and sketch would terrify me. This book sat on my shelf for years before I summoned the courage to crack it open and start to learn to draw. My motivation was to be able to draw the scenes I would experience on my summer vacation to the Maritimes....I merely wanted to be able to draw realistic buildings and figured that the human form was beyond me...well, let me tell you --I never thought it could be so simple! Now I am drawing realistic hands and objects, full of depth and realism. I feel like an artist who can draw (and draw well) and it took me only a bit over a week (in the evenings) and some practice. I love how easy Edwards makes it seem and I am so glad to have had the chance to read this book and apply its principles. I highly recommend it to anyone who is too scared to pick up a drawing pencil and bring some life to a plain sheet of paper!
178 internautes sur 199 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Lo, how the mighty have fallen 2 mai 2012
Par G. Jefford - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
I have had at least two previous editions of this book. They were printed on good stock. The hardback version of the current edition has paper that is thin enough to see the illustration on the next page. That's annoying. The reproductions of the drawings in earlier editions were of good quality and large enough to easily appreciate the differences pre and post-instruction. The reproductions in this edition are muddy-looking compared those in earlier editions. In the earlier versions, there were many examples of pre and post-instruction drawings, especially by kids. Those are all gone. Perhaps someone thought the date of their composition was too old to include them in this "newer" edition. That was a BIG mistake. The pre and post-instruction portraits in this edition are confined to tiny examples on two pages and are badly reproduced. It also looks as though the talent of her students has markedly decreased over the years since the previous editions. This is a big disappointment. I'm sorry I ordered this rather than the earlier one for my young friend. Now I'll have to send him the earlier version and an apology as well. Anyway, Betty Edwards, sue your publisher. Defenestrate your editor, too, if that editor was responsible for removing those great pre and post-instruction drawings contained in the earlier versions. I regret having spent the money on this edition, having talked it up on Facebook, and having waited so eagerly to receive it.
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ?   Dites-le-nous
Rechercher des commentaires

Discussions entre clients

Le forum concernant ce produit
Discussion Réponses Message le plus récent
Pas de discussions pour l'instant

Posez des questions, partagez votre opinion, gagnez en compréhension
Démarrer une nouvelle discussion
Première publication:
Aller s'identifier

Rechercher parmi les discussions des clients
Rechercher dans toutes les discussions Amazon

Rechercher des articles similaires par rubrique