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Ethan Frome [Anglais] [Poche]

Edith Wharton
4.3 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (10 commentaires client)
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Description de l'ouvrage

29 octobre 1992 Signet classics
`It was not so much his great height that marked him ... it was the careless powerful look that he had, in spite of a lameness checking each step like the jerk of a chain.' Set against the bleak winter landscape of New England, Ethan Frome tells the story of a poor farmer, lonely and downtrodden, his wife Zeena, and her cousin, the enchanting Mattie Silver. In the playing out of this short novel's powerful and engrossing drama, Edith Wharton constructed her least characteristic and most celebrated book. In its unyielding and shocking pessimism, its bleak demonstration of tragic waste, it is a masterpiece of psychological and emotional realism. In her introduction the distinguished critic Elaine Showalter discusses the background to the novel's composition and the reasons for its enduring success. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
--Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Broché .

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Extrait

Chapter 1

The village lay under two feet of snow, with drifts at the windy corners. In a sky of iron the points of the Dipper hung like icicles and Orion flashed his cold fires. The moon had set, but the night was so transparent that the white house-fronts between the elms looked grey against the snow, clumps of bushes made black stains on it, and the basement windows of the church sent shafts of yellow light far across the endless undulations.

Young Ethan Frome walked at a quick pace along the deserted street, past the bank and Michael Eady's new brick store and Lawyer Varnum's house with the two black Norway spruces at the gate. Opposite the Varnum gate, where the road fell away toward the Corbury valley, the church reared its slim white steeple and narrow peristyle. As the young man walked toward it the upper windows drew a black arcade along the side wall of the building, but from the lower openings, on the side where the ground sloped steeply down to the Corbury road, the light shot its long bars, illuminating many fresh furrows in the track leading to the basement door, and showing, under an adjoining shed, a line of sleighs with heavily blanketed horses.

The night was perfectly still, and the air so dry and pure that it gave little sensation of cold. The effect produced on Frome was rather of a complete absence of atmosphere, as though nothing less tenuous than ether intervened between the white earth under his feet and the metallic dome overhead. "It's like being in an exhausted receiver," he thought. Four or five years earlier he had taken a year's course at a technological college at Worcester, and dabbled in the laboratory with a friendly professor of physics; and the images supplied by that experience still cropped up, at unexpected moments, through the totally different associations of thought in which he had since been living. His father's death, and the misfortunes following it, had put a premature end to Ethan's studies; but though they had not gone far enough to be of much practical use they had fed his fancy and made him aware of huge cloudy meanings behind the daily face of things.

As he strode along through the snow the sense of such meanings glowed in his brain and mingled with the bodily flush produced by his sharp tramp. At the end of the village he paused before the darkened front of the church. He stood there a moment, breathing quickly, and looking up and down the street, in which not another figure moved. The pitch of the Corbury road, below lawyer Varnum's spruces, was the favourite coasting-ground of Starkfield, and on clear evenings the church corner rang till late with the shouts of the coasters; but to-night not a sled darkened the whiteness of the long declivity. The hush of midnight lay on the village, and all its waking life was gathered behind the church windows, from which strains of dance-music flowed with the broad bands of yellow light.

The young man, skirting the side of the building, went down the slope toward the basement door. To keep out of range of the revealing rays from within he made a circuit through the untrodden snow and gradually approached the farther angle of the basement wall. Thence, still hugging the shadow, he edged his way cautiously forward to the nearest window, holding back his straight spare body and craning his neck till he got a glimpse of the room.

Seen thus, from the pure and frosty darkness in which he stood, it seemed to be seething in a mist of heat. The metal reflectors of the gas-jets sent crude waves of light against the whitewashed walls, and the iron flanks of the stove at the end of the hall looked as though they were heaving with volcanic fires. The floor was thronged with girls and young men. Down the side wall facing the window stood a row of kitchen chairs from which the older women had just risen. By this time the music had stopped, and the musicians -- a fiddler, and the young lady who played the harmonium on Sundays -- were hastily refreshing themselves at one corner of the suppertable which aligned its devastated pie-dishes and ice-cream saucers on the platform at the end of the hall. The guests were preparing to leave, and the tide had already set toward the passage where coats and wraps were hung, when a young man with a sprightly foot and a shock of black hair shot into the middle of the floor and clapped his hands. The signal took instant effect. The musicians hurried to their instruments, the dancers-some already half-muffled for departure -- fell into line down each side of the room, the older spectators slipped back to their chairs, and the lively young man, after diving about here and there in the throng, drew forth a girl who had already wound a cherry-coloured "fascinator" about her head, and, leading her up to the end of the floor, whirled her down its length to the bounding tune of a Virginia reel.

Frome's heart was beating fast. He had been straining for a glimpse of the dark head under the cherry-coloured scarf and it vexed him that another eye should have been quicker than his. The leader of the reel, who looked as if he had Irish blood in his veins, danced well, and his partner caught his fire. As she passed down the line, her light figure swinging from hand to hand in circles of increasing swiftness, the scarf flew off her head and stood out behind her shoulders, and Frome, at each turn, caught sight of her laughing panting lips, the cloud of dark hair about her forehead, and the dark eyes which seemed the only fixed points in a maze of flying lines.

The dancers were going faster and faster, and the musicians, to keep up with them, belaboured their instruments like jockeys lashing their mounts on the homestretch; yet it seemed to the young man at the window that the reel would never end. Now and then he turned his eyes from the girl's face to that of her partner, which, in the exhilaration of the dance, had taken on a look of almost impudent ownership. Denis Eady was the son of Michael Eady, the ambitious Irish grocer, whose suppleness and effrontery had given Starkfield its first notion of "smart" business methods, and whose new brick store testified to the success of the attempt. His son seemed likely to follow in his steps, and was meanwhile applying the same arts to the conquest of the Starkfield maidenhood. Hitherto Ethan Frome had been content to think him a mean fellow; but now he positively invited a horse-whipping. It was strange that the girl did not seem aware of it: that she could lift her rapt face to her dancer's, and drop her hands into his, without appearing to feel the offence of his look and touch.

Frome was in the habit of walking into Starkfield to fetch home his wife's cousin, Mattie Silver, on the rare evenings when some chance of amusement drew her to the village. It was his wife who had suggested, when the girl came to live with them, that such opportunities should be put in her way. Mattie Silver came from Stam-ford, and when she entered the Fromes' household to act as her cousin Zeena's aid it was thought best, as she came without pay, not to let her feel too sharp a contrast between the life she had left and the isolation of a Starkfield farm. But for this -- as Frome sardonically reflected -- it would hardly have occurred to Zeena to take any thought for the girl's amusement.

When his wife first proposed that they should give Mattie an occasional evening out he had inwardly demurred at having to do the extra two miles to the village and back after his hard day on the farm; but not long afterward he had reached the point of wishing that Starkfield might give all its nights to revelry.

Mattie Silver had lived under his roof for a year, and from early morning till they met at supper he had frequent chances of seeing her; but no moments in her company were comparable to those when, her arm in his, and her light step flying to keep time with his long stride, they walked back through the night to the farm. He had taken to the girl from the first day, when he had driven over to the Flats to meet her, and she had smiled and waved to him from the train, crying out, "You must be Ethan!" as she jumped down with her bundles, while he reflected, looking over her slight person: "She don't look much on housework, but she ain't a fretter, anyhow." But it was not only that the coming to his house of a bit of hopeful young life was like the lighting of a fire on a cold hearth. The girl was more than the bright serviceable creature he had thought her. She had an eye to see and an ear to hear: he could show her things and tell her things, and taste the bliss of feeling that all he imparted left long reverberations and echoes he could wake at will.

It was during their night walks back to the farm that he felt most intensely the sweetness of this communion. He had always been more sensitive than the people about him to the appeal of natural beauty. His unfinished studies had given form to this sensibility and even in his unhappiest moments field and sky spoke to him with a deep and powerful persuasion. But hitherto the emotion had remained in him as a silent ache, veiling with sadness the beauty that evoked it. He did not even know whether any one else in the world felt as he did, or whether he was the sole victim of this mournful privilege. Then he learned that one other spirit had trembled with the same touch of wonder: that at his side, living under his roof and eating his bread, was a creature to whom he could say: "That's Orion down yonder; the big fellow to the right is Aldebaran, and the bunch of little ones -- like bees swarming -- they're the Pleiades..." or whom he could hold entranced before a ledge of granite thrusting up through the fern while he unrolled the huge panorama of the ice age, and the long dim stretches of succeeding time. The fact that admiration for his learning mingled with Mattie's wonder at what he taught was not the least part of his pleasure. And there were other sensations, less definable but more exquisite, which drew them together with a shock of silent joy: the cold red of sunset behind winter hills, the flight of... --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Broché .

Quatrième de couverture

Ethan Frome, dans une petite ferme du Massachusetts, est sous la domination de sa femme Zenobia, une mégère. L'arrivée de Mattie Silver, une cousine de Zenobia, illumine la vie d'Ethan en lui apportant de la douceur et de la compréhension. Mais elle déchaîne la jalousie de la redoutable Zenobia, qui va réussir à chasser la jeune fille. --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Poche .

Détails sur le produit

  • Poche: 160 pages
  • Editeur : Signet Books (29 octobre 1992)
  • Collection : Signet classics
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 0451525809
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451525802
  • Dimensions du produit: 17,5 x 10,4 x 1,3 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 4.3 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (10 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 630.368 en Livres anglais et étrangers (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres anglais et étrangers)
  • Table des matières complète
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4.3 étoiles sur 5
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6 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Un très bon Edith Warton 7 février 2009
Format:Poche
J'ai lu beaucoup de romans D'Edith Warton, je pense que je connais bien cette "auteure", Ethan Frome est particulièrement réussi car il est beaucoup plus court, plus ramassé et donc plus dense que d'autres romans d'E.W, l'histoire est belle, pathétique même et l'analyse des personnages si juste, si fine comme d'habitude mais sans ces longueurs auxquelles elle nous a habitué...
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4 internautes sur 4 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A great American classic 22 décembre 2004
Par HORAK
Format:Poche
Ethan Frome is a farmer in Starkfield, Massachusetts, at the beginning of the 20th century. He is unhappily married to Zenobia (Zeena), a suspicious, hypochondriac, bitter, narrow-minded, ignorant and discontented woman. He is strongly attracted to Zeena's cousin Mattie Silver who shares their household and is entrusted with all the chores which Zeena refuses to do. Ethan's tragic fate begins when Zeena peremptorily decides that they need a "hired girl" which would of course imply Mattie's departure since the Fromes don't have the means to employ two girls.
A novel of great intensity with its slow developing tragedy and characters plunging towards their destiny. The author's masterful economy of language vividly renders the oppressive "silent ache" that permanently hinders communication between Ethan and Zeena. The vision of the three main characters is done in an almost cinematic way as they are trapped indoors in the severe Massachusetts winter. The narrative pattern is original too since the whole plot is told by an unnamed narrator who met the taciturn Ethan many years after the events he is about to tell us. The reader has moments of doubt when the narrator tells a story in all details and long passages of dialogue he could not possibly have known or heard during his meeting with Ethan. But Edith Wharton's extraordinary craft makes the story break away from the contingencies of the frame and it comes to moving life for the reader. A superb novel, one of the finest and most intense narratives in the history of American literature.
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5 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Format:Poche
L'histoire d'un type pauvre et surtout d'un pauvre type, d'un lâche, pris entre deux femmes, coincé entre deux vies, incapable de choisir et tentant de fuir dans la mort en emportant celle qu'il aime et en laissant vivre celle qui a été son enfer. Mais, même cela, il le rate et reste coincé entre les deux, qui sont devenues pareilles après l'accident, et sont ses enfers ! REMARQUABLE ! Roman typique Nouvelle Angleterre esprit fin 19ème , comme on n'en fait plus, comme on n'en écrira plus, hélas ! Ce n'est pas du WASP pur et dur, mais l'esprit et surtout le regard inquisiteur sont là, immédiatement derrière. Une pure merveille, un joyau!
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1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Belle histoire d'amour tragique 25 août 2013
Par DSD
Format:Format Kindle
Ce court roman narre une très belle histoire d'amour intense et tragique car impossible : Ethan Frome, homme mal marié à une hypocondriaque ignorante et mesquine, tombe sous le charme de la jeune et jolie cousine de son épouse, recueillie par "pitié" à la mort de son père. Le drame se noue lorsque l'épouse soupçonneuse tente de se débarrasser de la demoiselle qu'elle a transformé en servante de substitution effectuant toutes les tâches ménagères qu'elle ne désire pas réaliser. Ethan n'est pas très sympathique à nos yeux car l'auteur le laisse prisonnier de sa pauvreté, de ses devoirs et de ses faiblesses humaines : il n'ose pas ruer dans les brancards et "tempérer" sa femme, donc il subit sa vie jusqu'au bout de sa tragédie. Cette histoire courte est intense et belle : à lire si possible en version originale.
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1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Très prenant et émouvant 4 juillet 2012
Par tounie
Format:Format Kindle|Achat authentifié par Amazon
Un classique mais sous tension... Un récit court et dense, où les personnages sont dépeints avec un sens de l'observation remarquable et une grande économie de moyens. L'atmosphère est lourde à souhait et l'écrivain rend très bien le sens inéluctable du destin et son ironie aussi. A redécouvrir.
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