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Finding Your Element: How to Discover Your Talents and Passions and Transform Your Life (Anglais) Broché – 30 janvier 2014


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Descriptions du produit

Revue de presse

Praise for FINDING YOUR ELEMENT by Sir Ken Robinson

“A book that is as relevant and imperative for the parents of a 12-year-old as it is for the CEO of a behemoth corporation. And with luck it will help you to find yours.”—Vanity Fair

“Fans may glean some insight about understanding who we are as individuals and how we can have a better life that communicates our uniqueness to the world.”—Kirkus Reviews

Finding Your Element is an accessible, actionable guide for discovering what most matters.”—New York Journal of Books --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Broché .

Présentation de l'éditeur

Ken Robinson, author of the international bestseller The Element and the most viewed talk on TED.com, offers a practical guide to discovering your passions and natural aptitudes, and finding the point at which the two meet: Finding Your Element.The Element has inspired readers all over the world to change their lives and this new companion is a practical guide containing all the tools, techniques and resources you need to discover the depth of your abilities and unlock your potential. Among the questions it answers are: • How do I find out what my talents and passions are? • What if I love something I'm not good at - or I'm good at something I don't love? • What if I can't make a living from my Element? • How do I do help my children find their Element?No matter what you do, or where you are in life, if you're searching for your Element, this book will help you find it. 'Relevant, imperative . . . It will help you to find yours' Vanity Fair 'Happiness really is within your grasp' Guardian 'Leads readers to a place where natural aptitudes and abilities converge with one's passions' Kirkus ReviewsSir Ken Robinson, PhD, is an internationally recognized leader in the development of creativity, innovation, and human potential. He advises governments, corporations, education systems, and some of the world's leading cultural organizations. The videos of his famous 2006 and 2010 talks to the prestigious TED Conference have been seen by an estimated 200 million people in over 150 countries.Lou Aronica is the author of two novels and coauthor of several works of nonfiction, including The Culture Code (with Clotaire Rapaille) and The Element.


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Détails sur le produit

  • Broché: 288 pages
  • Editeur : Penguin (30 janvier 2014)
  • Collection : PRESS NF PB
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 0241952026
  • ISBN-13: 978-0241952023
  • Dimensions du produit: 12,9 x 1,7 x 19,8 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 5.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (1 commentaire client)
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Par Marine Chambat le 14 juin 2015
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
This book is great, very helpful, thank you a lot ! I can find my Element now this is perfect !
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120 internautes sur 124 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Element = Aptitude and Passion 23 mai 2013
Par Caroline L. - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
Ken Robinson wrote this book as a follow-up to his other book The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything by Ken Robinson, Lou Aronica (Reprint Edition) [Paperback(2009)]. He takes a 360 view of your life and walks you through it all. You do a series of exercises where you ask yourself deep questions. You find your element when you find the intersection between your passions and aptitudes.

He has three major principles:

Principle #1: Your Life is Unique.

We're all different.

We're all a mix of nature and nurture.

Principle #2: You create your own life.

Carl Jung: "I am not what has happened to me, I am what I choose to become."

Principle #3: Life is Organic

We all change. We don't have a linear path. He incorporates a lot of examples of successful people who had a completely nonlinear path to success.

Vivek Wadhwa, famous for his work on immigrants working in the technology field in the United States, realized that "there is no link between what you study in college and how successful or otherwise you are later in your life."

Ken Robinson talks about a lot of the existing literature and methods for finding out what your passion is and he's fairly critical of them. He talks about what's called the Forer Effect, also known as the Barnum Effect. You mold your personality to conform with what people tell you your personality incorporates. Robinson is in favor of using personality types to describe yourself, but he says not to let the personality definitions (MBTI for example) limit you.

He also takes a lot of time to talk about happiness and positive psychology. He differentiates between your physical and spiritual well-being. When I was in the Andes and taking an anthropology class, I learned that the indigenous culture believes in two types of life force. One is the breath of life and the other I would call the force of spirit, just like Scott Russell Sanders' The Force of Spirit. He talks about Gretchen Rubin The Happiness Project: Or, Why I Spent a Year Trying to Sing in the Morning, Clean My Closets, Fight Right, Read Aristotle, and Generally Have More Fun.

His definition of happiness comes from Sonja Lyubomirsky: Happiness is the experience of joy, contentment, and well-being combined with a sense that life is good and worthwhile. I felt like that was a really comprehensive yet concise summary and I think that the happiness section was the best part of this book.

Robinson goes on to talk about the 5 different kinds of well-being: career, social, financial, physical, and community. He asks you what sorts of hurdles or responsibilities you have and what sorts of risks that you can take. He asks you who you want to be, but in a much more specific way.

He also talks about Bonnie Ware The Top Five Regrets of the Dying: A Life Transformed by the Dearly Departing, because a lot of his action steps at the end of the book have to do with mitigating risks. I found it interesting that a lot of the suggestions that he had were in line with things that Barry Schwartz said at the end of The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less.

I've seen Robinson's TED talk and expected more of the book to be about the education system and creativity. While he does talk about them, he encourages the reader to engage in a lot of introspection through a variety of exercises; each chapter ends with a few questions about you and your life. My favorite exercises had to do with vision boards. I used Pinterest to create them and I really loved having a concrete, pictorial representation of more abstract concepts, such as the activities that I do in daily life.

Robinson also says that it's all an iterative process and we grow organically (Principle #3), so nobody should expect his or her desires at one point to be the same as at another point in his or her life. I know that it's valuable for me to read this as a recent college graduate and that I'll read it again, further down the line.
113 internautes sur 120 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Finding your Element is "vital to understanding who you are and what you're capable of being and doing with your life." 21 mai 2013
Par Robert Morris - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
According to Ken Robinson, what he characterizes as "The Element" is not a physical location but the challenge is to locate it, nonetheless. "It's about doing something that feels so completely natural to you, that resonates so strongly with you, that you feel as if this is who you really are." Some people locate it in childhood, others decades later, and still others never. "Finding your Element is a quest to find yourself...it is a two-way journey: an inward journey to explore what lies within you and an outward journey to explore opportunities in the world around you." Robinson wrote The Element (2009) with Lou Aronica who also assisted with the writing of Finding Your Element four years later. Ever since the first book was published, Robinson explains, "people have asked me how they can find their own Element, or help other people to find theirs."

In response, this sequel has five main thematic threads that weave throughout the book, each of which is intended to help the reader reflect and focus on finding their own Element and, if they wish to, help others to do so. Robinson provides ideas and principles as well as stories and examples, stories, and other resources such as 15 exercises to complete (more about them in a moment) and clusters of questions to consider at the end of each chapter before moving on to the next. In fact, each chapter title is a question. "Although there are ten chapters in the book, Finding Your Element is not a ten-step program." Just as Oscar Wilde once suggested, "Be yourself. Everyone else is taken," Robinson suggests that only the reader can answer the questions posed. "In the end, only you will know if you've found your Element or if you are still looking for it. Whichever it proves to be, you should never doubt this is a quest worth taking." True to form, Robinson asks most of the right questions but it remains for each reader to answer them, perhaps using some of the tools that Robinson provides. I have found mind mapping to be an especially helpful technique during both an inward journey of personal discovery and an outward journey of the world in which I live. As with answering questions, however, each reader must select which tools to use as well as when and how.

These are among the dozens of passages that caught my eye, also listed to indicate the scope of Robinson's coverage.

o A Personal Quest (Pages xxii-xxiv)
o Three Elemental Principles (19-27)
o True North (27-30)
o Hidden Depths (39-44)
o Finding Your Aptitudes (44-48)
o What's Your Style? (65-71)
o Two Sorts of Energy (84-87)
o The Unhappy Truth (113-115)
o Having a Purpose What Is Happiness? (117-120)
o The Meaning of Happiness (120-126)
o Seeing Through the Barriers (143-146)
o Who Are You? (147-148)
o A Question of 160-165)
o Figuring Out Where You Are (173-174)
o The Culture of Tribes (191-192)
o Moving Forward by Going Back (215-222)

As I began to re-read this book prior to composing this brief commentary, I realized that amidst all the information, insights, and counsel that Robinson provides in abundances, there were certain key points that I had missed. I strongly recommend re-reading this book, highlighting especially relevant material along the way and then reviewing that material from time to time. I also suggest keeping a notebook near at hand in which to record personal thoughts, feelings, experiences, concerns, and other professional as well as personal issues.

As quoted earlier, Robinson views "finding your Element is a quest to find yourself...it is a two-way journey: an inward journey to explore what lies within you and an outward journey to explore opportunities in the world around you." This is a never-ending process because each of us and our circumstances change and adjustments must be made to accommodate them.

This is what Ken Robinson has in mind, when concluding: "Like the rest of nature, human talents and passions are tremendously diverse and they take many forms. As individuals, we're all motivated by different dreams and we thrive -- and we wilt too -- in very different circumstances. Recognizing your own dreams and the conditions you need to fulfill them are essential to becoming who you can be. Finding your own Element won't guarantee that you'll spend the rest of your life in a constant, unbroken state of pleasure and delight. It will give you a deeper sense of who you really are and of the life you could and maybe should live."
64 internautes sur 69 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Beyond a Self Help, Feel Good Book 24 mai 2013
Par John M. Clarke - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
I loved the book. I'm retiring, albeit reluctantly, from the work that I have loved doing for 40 years. This book comes at the right time for me since I have been struggling with what I can do with my time for this stage of my life other than be a greeter at Wal-Mart. I took Sir Ken's advice and began to take stock of my aptitudes and interests. At various times in my life, I have dabbled in cooking and art with some degree of success and I plan to pursue these interests now and after retirement. Having a passion in life, according to Sir Ken, feeds your spirit and ultimately this is what makes living an adventure. I love his sense of humor (for a first hand experience of a genuinely funny and entertaining talk, see Ken Robinson on the TED website ), his wonderful and realistic way of viewing the world, and sage advice on how to live a fulfilling life regardless of your circumstances. the real life examples were inspiring and thought provoking. This is one book that I will pass along to friends and family looking how to experience life to the fullest.
91 internautes sur 111 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Nothing new here 4 juin 2013
Par Nan - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
I borrowed this book from my local library and am glad that I did not purchase it. There's nothing new here: write or mindmap your interests, skills/aptitudes, passions. Find the intersection of these. Associate with your tribe-those people with similar interests. Take action. This has been written over and over in similar books.
The challenge is that this process is messy, long and not necessarily successful. It's trial and error. Hopefully you'll stumble on your element. But this book did nothing to facilitate this.
Other issues:
Most of the examples involve people finding their passion in the arts. What about all the other professions-medical, scientific, engineering, teaching, service, etc? Lots of passionate people work in these fields and contribute much to society.
The chapter on testing is thin but that is just as well. After all, who do you know who's found their passion through testing?
11 internautes sur 13 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Ken Robinson is a MUST READ 27 mai 2013
Par Retired Principal - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
All 3 of Robinson's books are remarkable resources. He has a great TED talk available on YouTube that can give you some introduction to his theories. Central to his work is his concept of "element". Robinson would way a person is in his/her element when s/he finds that thing that s/he love to do and does that thing well. Schools often don't give children much of a chance to discover their individual elements. Higher education is often worse. Career patterns and cultures can make it hard as well.

Robinson's work not only introduces his concepts very understandably and simply, it also reports from the lives of many individuals and institutions that have gotten it right. Inspiring and instructive stories of individuals, cultures and institutions that have found their elements even when very unusual and even up against unfavorable odds.

Robinson writes in a way that is easy to read. His stories are captivating. His impact on your life and how you guide others in your work place and your families will be profound.
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