Commencez à lire Gamestorming sur votre Kindle dans moins d'une minute. Vous n'avez pas encore de Kindle ? Achetez-le ici Ou commencez à lire dès maintenant avec l'une de nos applications de lecture Kindle gratuites.

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

 
 
 

Essai gratuit

Découvrez gratuitement un extrait de ce titre

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Tout le monde peut lire les livres Kindle, même sans un appareil Kindle, grâce à l'appli Kindle GRATUITE pour les smartphones, les tablettes et les ordinateurs.
Gamestorming: A Playbook for Innovators, Rulebreakers, and Changemakers
 
Agrandissez cette image
 

Gamestorming: A Playbook for Innovators, Rulebreakers, and Changemakers [Format Kindle]

Dave Gray , Sunni Brown , James Macanufo
4.5 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (2 commentaires client)

Prix conseillé : EUR 18,53 De quoi s'agit-il ?
Prix éditeur - format imprimé : EUR 30,57
Prix Kindle : EUR 11,81 TTC & envoi gratuit via réseau sans fil par Amazon Whispernet
Économisez : EUR 18,76 (61%)

Formats

Prix Amazon Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle EUR 11,81  
Broché EUR 30,51  

Offre Éclair Kindle Abonnez-vous à la Newsletter Offre Éclair Kindle et recevez un ebook gratuit.

Assurez-vous d'avoir bien coché la case Offre Éclair Kindle, puis cliquez sur "Abonnez-vous" pour vous inscrire et recevoir votre code promotionnel.

-40%, -50%, -60%... Découvrez les Soldes Amazon jusqu'au 5 août 2014 inclus. Profitez-en !






Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

Great things don't happen in a vacuum. But creating an environment for creative thinking and innovation can be a daunting challenge. How can you make it happen at your company? The answer may surprise you: gamestorming.

This book includes more than 80 games to help you break down barriers, communicate better, and generate new ideas, insights, and strategies. The authors have identified tools and techniques from some of the world's most innovative professionals, whose teams collaborate and make great things happen. This book is the result: a unique collection of games that encourage engagement and creativity while bringing more structure and clarity to the workplace. Find out why -- and how -- with Gamestorming.

  • Overcome conflict and increase engagement with team-oriented games
  • Improve collaboration and communication in cross-disciplinary teams with visual-thinking techniques
  • Improve understanding by role-playing customer and user experiences
  • Generate better ideas and more of them, faster than ever before
  • Shorten meetings and make them more productive
  • Simulate and explore complex systems, interactions, and dynamics
  • Identify a problem's root cause, and find the paths that point toward a solution

Détails sur le produit


En savoir plus sur les auteurs

Découvrez des livres, informez-vous sur les écrivains, lisez des blogs d'auteurs et bien plus encore.

Quels sont les autres articles que les clients achètent après avoir regardé cet article?


Commentaires en ligne 

3 étoiles
0
2 étoiles
0
1 étoiles
0
4.5 étoiles sur 5
4.5 étoiles sur 5
Commentaires client les plus utiles
8 internautes sur 8 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 have fun while creating great things 26 juillet 2011
Par mko
Format:Broché
If you want to came up with something you usually have two options. Either you go with some kind of process (this way is usually good one if you want to have your back covered) or you go with unconventional methods (if you have enough money to cover your expenses in case of failure). The second approach is what Gamestorming is all about. First of all, you get the explanation of what playing game is all about. This is very important part, because it will give you arguments when it comes to convince other people to play a little bit instead of just 'inventing' things through regular process of 'thinking'. It might be hard work to convince your co-workers to use this way of solving issues. Many people find 'playing games' a perfect example of wasting the time. That's why it is very good idea to show how playing games makes your brain work different way. After explaining the concept of gamestorming authors go through various examples of games that might help you solve your problems. The collection of games is really impressive. There are almost 100 different games presented within the book. Games are divided into sections that help you solve particular issues. Opening games help you produce ideas quickly, exploring games help you go through the ideas you came up with, closing games help you to get into the end of the innovation process. Reading the book really is fun, however, mind one thing. Not everybody likes to play. If your colleagues do not like to play RPGs, they don't know what RTS is, and board games are just a mean of wasting time, gamestorming is probably not good for you. I agree that pushing people into 'another worlds', with different rules might be good way of finding what hasn't been found yet, however ' not everybody is ready for that. Not everybody likes to play. Lire la suite ›
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Pragmatic & straightforward 18 avril 2012
Par MgtConsul
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Very easy to read and to grasp
Easy to tailor to each context based on explanations given in the book
Successful and very illustrative title for this book
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 étoiles sur 5  85 commentaires
85 internautes sur 87 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Game On 10 mars 2011
Par Ken Rider - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
The authors deserve credit for pulling the content of this book together and organizing it in a way that is inviting and intuitive to read and browse. It's all about using games to help groups of people think about and address business challenges in creative ways. Although it has 8 chapters, Gamestorming really divides into two major sections: (1) an introductory set of chapters that define what games are, their key characteristics and skills for effective play and (2) an expansive collection of about 90 games, each with rules and strategy explained in one to three pages of text. The book concludes with a short example of how to put games to practical use.

PROS: Gamestorming is an engaging, one-of-a-kind resource for using games in business settings. The introduction and early chapters are well geared to those without much gaming background and do a good job explaining how games can be used to help groups define problems, clarify thinking, generate ideas and ID next steps. There is even a small section with simple drawing tips for illustrating ideas...a nice addition. The diverse selection of games, which appropriately fills more than three-quarters of the book, is applicable to a range of situations. Think of it like a collection of "recipes" for games, which good facilitators can follow exactly or adapt to their own needs. Purely as an idea book for business games, it would rate at least a "4" but there are a few things that make it less useful than it probably could be for some audiences.

CONS: The book is ambitiously written for "the novice and the experienced practitioner alike," but appealing to everyone can be tough. Novice facilitators will like the intro but may find the later sections somewhat lite on game strategy. It's just hard in a few paragraphs to fully explain each game's flow or give newcomers much in the way of tips or trouble shooting to make a confident go of it. A beefed-up focus on "how to" might have been better for this group (those looking for a primer on facilitation may want to check out Kaner's "Facilitator's Guide to Participatory Decision-Making"). By contrast, seasoned facilitators might want more nuance in other areas, like how to organize the rich info games generate for later use, so it isn't reduced to a bunch of meaningless sound bites -- a challenge with any brainstorming session. Finally, to round out its practical application, a few more examples or links showing how games can be used to solve real-life problems would help (see Daniel Hoang's Amazon review of Gamestorming, for several good online links).
49 internautes sur 51 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A play book for work and life 3 août 2010
Par C. Avampato - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
For several weeks, I've been combing my bookshelves for activities to incorporate into my LIM College class on social media marketing. I wanted games to drive home the information in unconventional, interactive ways. I went to my theatre books, my business books, and my books filled with writing exercises. Nothing seemed quite right. And then I found Gamestorming. It felt like a gift out of the sky. My anxiety about the class diminished a bit more with every page.

Gamestorming details games that engage groups, both large and small, in learning and discovery. They work in corporations and in schools, and I'd like to add that they are a valuable tool for navigating just about any decision and complication in life. I found myself noting in nearly every margin how to use each game. The clear, concise description, depictions, and plan for each took a great deal of thought and care from the authors.

The metaphor of life as a game is well worked over. The trouble with the game of life is that there are no rules. You don't make them and neither does anyone else. They change from moment to moment, and the rule that seemed to work today may never be useful again. We are forced in every situation to think on our feet. Gamestorming gives us more confidence and empowers us to take our futures in our own hands.
16 internautes sur 17 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Building a Shared Language of Effective Meeting Strategies (and more) 4 octobre 2010
Par Murray Thompson - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
In their book, Dave Gray, Sunni Brown, and James Macanufo have researched and codified a number of strategies to help people generate new ideas, work through them, and act on them. But in making this book, the authors have done more than create a valuable reference of approaches for idea generation and decision-making: they've also begun to create a shared language that we can all make use of.

Rather than going into the games cold, they begin by placing them in the context of a larger framework, allowing the reader to better understand how each game could best suit their situations and mix and match with each other.

Those who've read Gang of Four patterns in the programming world, have dabbled with various design pattern libraries, or are familiar with other collections taking the approach of Christopher Alexander's "A Pattern Language" may find the format recognizable. As they never mention a pattern approach, I'm not sure if the authors intended it that way, but the book is structured in a very similar fashion: naming each game, explaining the basic layout of how it works, and when to apply it.

As with the other pattern-related books, the authors do not claim to know it all, and in fact expect others to discover more patterns -- in this case, the games -- and for the ones they mention to be refined over time. Also similar to the pattern-based approaches, they encourage the reader to use the ones they feel will best fit together for what they need to accomplish, rather than use them in very prescriptive ways.

In naming each game and using a pattern-like structure to explain them, it not only makes it easy to read each individual game, but also helps codify them -- packaging them up into a shorthand that people came refer to and apply quickly with shared understanding.

The authors mention using the games in 'knowledge work' situations, but I feel that it is really applicable to any industry. The things that they are really talking about address real LEADERSHIP, rather than industrial-age, control-focused management approaches that apply less and less to even manufacturing industries today. (I find a lot of ideas in the book reflecting the organizational learning approaches advocated by Senge and Mintzberg.)

You'll find the likely-used-too-often SWOT method in this book, and probably many more that you're already familiar with. But like me, I bet you'll read a few more that you'll be thinking about applying in a future meeting, project, or even when you're stuck for ideas working on your own.

Read the first 75 pages to start, and look through the rest of the games as you can, and keep it nearby as reference for your next strategy session.
43 internautes sur 55 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Activites for Groups, would be a better title 1 août 2010
Par C. Hlas - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
"Gamestorming" seemed to be chosen as the title of this book because the authors encourage the use of games for the purpose of "brainstorming" (i.e., generating ideas). I find this to be a noble goal because elements of games are underutilized in realms of business, education, etc. However...

Calling the activities presented in the book "games" stretches any definition of the word (which they never define, nor do they formally define gamestorming). The activities that are presented do have rules (maybe "directions" would have been a better word), but lack an objective/goal to make them actual games. For example, "To let leadership understand and be responsive to any and all questions around the topic" (p. 181) is an example of a goal of one of the games in the book. I understand that games are difficult to define, but that goal does not sound like the goal of a game, nor does it sound very fun.

That said, the activity in question ("Help Me Understand") is one that I plan on trying during my first day of class this semester. So if you can get beyond the nomenclature you will find a book with interesting activities for organizing meetings or other groups of people.

Final nit-pick. The book indicates the virtues of iteration in many examples, but never includes iteration as an important attribute of the "games" they create.
20 internautes sur 25 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A Gamechanger 28 juillet 2010
Par A. Osterwalder - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
With Gamestorming Dave, Sunni, and James created one of the most valuable and applicable collection of tools and techniques for organizational design that I have ever come across. The "games" outlined in the book help you make ideas more tangible and meetings more productive, notably through visual techniques. Gamestorming is a window into the future of how groups will work.

There is no way around this book if you are serious about making innovation and change happen in your organization.
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ?   Dites-le-nous
Rechercher des commentaires
Rechercher uniquement parmi les commentaires portant sur ce produit

Passages les plus surlignés

 (Qu'est-ce que c'est ?)
&quote;
A fuzzy goal is one that "motivates the general direction of the work, without blinding the team to opportunities along the journey." &quote;
Marqué par 231 utilisateurs Kindle
&quote;
Knowledge work is fundamentally different: workers are expected not so much to perform standard roles but to generate creative, innovative results that surprise and delight customers and colleagues. &quote;
Marqué par 137 utilisateurs Kindle
&quote;
There are five kinds of questions for finding your way in complex challenge spaces: opening, navigating, examining, experimental, and closing questions. &quote;
Marqué par 137 utilisateurs Kindle

Discussions entre clients

Le forum concernant ce produit
Discussion Réponses Message le plus récent
Pas de discussions pour l'instant

Posez des questions, partagez votre opinion, gagnez en compréhension
Démarrer une nouvelle discussion
Thème:
Première publication:
Aller s'identifier
 

Rechercher parmi les discussions des clients
Rechercher dans toutes les discussions Amazon
   


Les clients qui ont surligné cet ebook ont également surligné


Rechercher des articles similaires par rubrique