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The Gate Thief
 
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The Gate Thief [Format Kindle]

Orson Scott Card

Prix éditeur - format imprimé : EUR 6,64
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Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

In this sequel to The Lost Gate, bestselling author Orson Scott Card continues his fantastic tale of the Mages of Westil who live in exile on Earth in The Gate Thief, a novel of the Mither Mages.

Here on Earth, Danny North is still in high school, yet he holds in his heart and mind all the stolen outselves of thirteen centuries of gatemages. The Families still want to kill him if they can't control him…and they can't control him. He is far too powerful.

And on Westil, Wad is now nearly powerless—he lost everything to Danny in their struggle. Even if he can survive the revenge of his enemies, he still must somehow make peace with the Gatemage Daniel North.

For when Danny took that power from Loki, he also took the responsibility for the Great Gates. And when he comes face-to-face with the mages who call themselves Bel and Ishtoreth, he will come to understand just why Loki closed the gates all those centuries ago.

At the publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management software (DRM) applied.


Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 819 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 384 pages
  • Editeur : Tor Books; Édition : Reissue (19 mars 2013)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B00AEC9JGA
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Activé
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°52.065 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
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En savoir plus sur l'auteur

Orson Scott Card (né et vivant aux Etats-Unis) est l'un des aute urs de science-fiction (la série Ender), de fantasy (les chroniques d'Alvin le faiseur) et de romans historiques les plus connus, lus et estimés dans le monde. Il a remporté le prix Hugo et le prix Nébula deux années consécutives, pour La Stratégie Ender et sa suite, La voix des morts, exploit sans précédent.

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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.8 étoiles sur 5  272 commentaires
26 internautes sur 28 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Middle book Melancholy 28 juin 2013
Par Robin Snyder - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
I'm not sure how I feel about this book it is muddled in my mind. First I generally have enjoyed books by Orson Scott Card and some of the story was there for me and other aspects just missed the mark.

Things I liked include:

The back story of Bel and Loki and understanding why Loki decided to start eating gates. I enjoyed Loki/Wad's half of the story on Westil trying to help Anonoei get her sons to safety and revenge on Queen Bexoi. The Westil part of the story was very intriguing for me and played out well. The flow was good and I wanted to learn more. Learning more about Mages was cool and Danny figuring out his new powers and coming out to some of his friends all good parts to the story. I also like Anonoei's boys I think that is setting up nicely to turn into something in the next book.

Things I didn't like:

All the introspection and explanation of the Kah and Bah the innerself and outerself I think I just re-fell asleep typing that. Also the addition of even more magic or the whole new Egyptian lore added on top of the Norse lore it just seemed like an overabundance of mythology and then they threw Jesus on top of all that.
But my biggest gripe is why why why does every girl in Danny's life now want to sleep with him? Not only do they want to sleep with him which maybe I might buy into with his new godlike status, but they want to have his baby. What teenage girl in her right mind is looking to sleep with someone in high school just to get pregnant? To me that part was ridiculous and took up way too much time.
The parts of the book I liked I really liked but the parts I hated I absolutely hated. There were some great twists at the end but honestly I was a little bored by then. This was an okay book and I will probably read the last one to see how it all plays out hoping that this is just the middle book syndrome and the third book will be able to rise above the drudgery.
11 internautes sur 12 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Character Development 13 mai 2013
Par karen j - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
I feel that the "Gate Theif" did not measure up to the first installment of the series. The second book has several moments of recap which I think once is enough for a refresher, so the constant rehash of events for me is a bit heavy. The explanations about the magic and myths in the storyline is too long-winded which matches the slow pace of the story. I also feel that there could have been a little more development with Danny. He grew from being a loner to someone who can rely on friends and is a bit more level headed but given how Card has written more developed characters, the character Danny could've been given more thought.
43 internautes sur 56 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
2.0 étoiles sur 5 Hastily written, poorly done. 25 mars 2013
Par Chris Mullins - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
This is the worst OSC book that I've yet to read.

I quite enjoyed the first book, and was quite excited to see this show up on my Kindle a few days ago. Then I read it. Ick.

One of OSC's talents in the past has been writing believable young children. Ender, Peter, and others have all been very believable characters. With this book I'm afraid Card has Jumped the Shark.

Our Gatemage here is nothing but a whiny caricature of a person. His only personality trait is to be exactly what Card needs in any given scene. Need a morally snotty teen? Check. Need a mouthy kid? Check. Need a respectful kid? Check. Danny completely morphs from scene to scene and has absolutely no internal consistency.

Add the exceptionally weak plotting, a stupid and clearly very rushed "We're on a deadline here!" ending, and you have all the makings for a pretty horrible book.
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
2.0 étoiles sur 5 So close, yet so far away. 29 mars 2014
Par 00110011 - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Poche|Achat vérifié
Like so many others, I waited eagerly for this installment. Like so many others I found Danny's character to be a massive let down. Schizophrenia can be the only explanation. At times he is a calculating and inquisitive gatemage who is eager to both hone his skills and understand the ramifications of his existence. Other times, he is self-centered, simple and whiny, as other readers have noted. While adolescence is difficult and hormones can create interesting dynamics in youth people, its simply isn't plausible on any level.

Which brings to the subject of the dialogue between Danny and his more youthful friends. It's strained, poorly written, overly formulaic at moments and a caricature of true teen interactions. In a book like this, its important to know how teens talk and the author falls way short. Some of this existed in the first book, but not to this extent. It was very distracting.

As others have mentioned there is a significant time spent discussing how (spoiler) Set and his minions enter and take control of drowthers and mages. As some point - early on - it held the story back. The easiest way to offer a clear explanation is to let the story and character interaction offer insight. Instead, we got paragraphs and paragraphs of description. I actually sat the book down for about 4 days because it.

The ending was abysmal. It left a tremendous amount of questions, left the story untold at a critical moment and most importantly, contradicted everything we had been led to believe about a gatefather. It felt rushed, like the author had simply exhausted himself to a point where he wanted out of his own story. In many ways it was an arrogant and selfish way to end a book that so many people had patiently waited for so long.

High points: Our enemy (or friend?) Wad/Loki is a brilliant character. He is complex and interesting in believable ways. He is both likeable and disgusting, evil and benevolent. Just a wonderfully executed character. His two former lovers are additionally appealing and appalling in a way that draws you into the story. (In fact, it's only because of these characters that I finished the book at all.)

All in all, this isn't the book that most of us have been waiting for. The author's command of youthful dialogue and character development threatened the integrity of the story and nearly killed interest at several points. We so much about Wad in particular, that at times he became the most important character in the book, despite the title. So much so, that a book just about him would welcomed with great enthusiasm.

The abrupt end gives us hope there is another book coming. We can only hope that it will answer more questions than it answers and the author won't resort to a cliffhanger ending to keep us engaged. We also hope the author spends more time with young people so the dialogue will be more realistic and support the story appeal rather than chip away at it.
7 internautes sur 9 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 The Series Continues to Build 25 mars 2013
Par Dylan Valliere - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié|Achat vérifié
Card's second installment in the Mither Mages was an easy, fun read. I thought it was an improvement over The Lost Gate (book one) as both the characters and the mythology deepened. The protagonist, Danny North and the Gate Thief Wad both become much more compelling. The Mither Mages world invented by Card is interesting and compelling. The vast quantity of detail conveyed was impressive, especially since it was done without boring the reader. While I wouldn't put this series on par with Tolkien's Middle Earth or Lewis' Narnia, it did evoke a similar pleasure of exploring a broad new mythos. The greatly enjoyed being walked by Card through his world building.

This book is only 4 stars, rather than 5, primarily because it seemed to lack an adequate conflict and resolution. Instead, we had mythology and character development setting the state for book 3. Series are best when they do both: build the series story arc and present a somewhat self-contained conflict and resolution. The Gate Thief felt like the first half of a longer book rather than the second book in a trilogy. One other negative: Card's teenage characters (which seem to be a huge obsession across various novels/series) are less than realistic. All the teen girls want to be with Danny right away and they're all making blatant public plays at him? And one just wants his baby in her before he goes off to war--when fearing for him, her hands instinctively moved to her empty uterus? I'm no teen girl but that seems incredibly far-fetched to me.
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