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Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In
 
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Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In [Format Kindle]

Roger Fisher , William L. Ury , Bruce Patton
5.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (4 commentaires client)

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Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

The key text on problem-solving negotiation-updated and revised

Since its original publication nearly thirty years ago, Getting to Yes has helped millions of people learn a better way to negotiate. One of the primary business texts of the modern era, it is based on the work of the Harvard Negotiation Project, a group that deals with all levels of negotiation and conflict resolution. Getting to Yes offers a proven, step-by-step strategy for coming to mutually acceptable agreements in every sort of conflict. Thoroughly updated and revised, it offers readers a straight- forward, universally applicable method for negotiating personal and professional disputes without getting angry-or getting taken.


Biographie de l'auteur

Roger Fisher is the Samuel Williston Professor of Law Emeritus and director emeritus of the Harvard Negotiation Project.

William Ury cofounded the Harvard Negotiation Project and is the award-winning author of several books on negotiation.

Bruce Patton is cofounder and Distinguished Fellow of the Harvard Negotiation Project and the author of Difficult Conversations, a New York Times bestseller.

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Commentaires client les plus utiles
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A jewel ! Un joyau ... 23 juillet 2014
Format:Format Kindle
Stimulating, fun and exciting book ... Much nicer than the French translation !
Very useful for lawyers favoring negotiation.
Everything in this book seems obvious, but to think twice, the proposed systematization of the process is a valuable thread.

Stimulant, amusant et passionant bouquin ... bien plus agréable que la traduction française que j'ai lue.
Particulièrement utile pour les avocats favorisant la négociation.
Tout semble évident dans ce livre, mais, finalement, la systématisation de la démarche s'avère un précieux fil conducteur.
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 Pas de surprise 15 septembre 2013
Par Schaeffer
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Ce petit livre (moins de 200 pages) contient ce que j'attendais de lui: une méthode simple de négociation. Celle-ci se base sur des principes énoncés clairement, détaillés et illustrés par des exemples marquants. La technique de mise en œuvre des principes est illustrée correctement.

Le livre se lit facilement et en terminant l'on dispose de repères pour conduire des négociation profitables, que ce soit dans un contexte personnel ou professionnel.
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 A la hauteur de mes attentes 25 mars 2013
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Très bien écrit et instructif, que ce soit pour la vie professionnelle ou la vie de tous les jours, ce livre fait beaucoup évoluer l'esprit et si tout le monde le lisait peut être que la société avancerait un peu mieux!
Bravo Roger Fischer pour cette étude.
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 Le fameux win-win expliqué 27 mai 2012
Par srial33
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Ce livre permet de comprendre en quoi les négociations win-win sont utiles et comment les mener à bien en réétudiant les principes de bases de tout bon négociateur !
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Amazon.com: 4.5 étoiles sur 5  270 commentaires
75 internautes sur 76 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Great Information, Could Use Better Layout 2 juillet 2012
Par Lisa Shea - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
The title of Fisher and Ury's book is Getting to Yes - Negotiating Agreement without Giving In. It's a case where the title clearly lays out what the book is about. In Getting to Yes the authors present, step by step, how to find your way to a win-win solution that helps meet your goals while at the same time preserving the relationship so that future negotiations also go smoothly.

This book was the assigned textbook for a college course I took on negotiation, but it's one of those fairly rare cases where the material that's useful for a college course is also immensely useful for off-the-street people in a variety of situations. This book avoids complicated jargon and long, droning background chapters. Instead, it plunges into helpful information to assist people in negotiating for a new car, negotiating issues with their landlords, and all the many ways we all negotiate for our position throughout life.

Negotiation isn't just for union leaders trying to avert a strike. All of us negotiate each day as we try to juggle our many roles. We negotiate with our co-workers over assignments. We negotiate with our family members over chores. In an ideal world all of those discussions would go quickly, smoothly, and with as little strife as possible.

Getting to Yes provided numerous helpful examples which made their points more easy to understand. It is so true that people tend to remember stories where they might not remember dry text. When I think about this book I do remember several of the stories clearly, and those help to represent the points the authors were making. The stories help remind me to focus on the issues when negotiating and to look for objective standards to work with.

The information presented is wonderful, and immediately useful in life.

On the down side, this is a new version of older material. The authors chose to keep the initial book in its original form and then add on additional information at the end. I appreciate for historical reasons why they wanted to do that. However, from a fresh reader point of view, I feel they should present an integrated whole which most clearly presents the full information. The way the book is laid out currently, you have to go back and forth to find all information on a given topic.

Also, the format is not laid out for easy reference. If they went more for a "dummies" style with an easy to scan layout, graphs and charts to quickly find and scan, and quick end-summaries, that would make this more useful as a reference book to keep on a shelf. Right now if I had an issue to handle it would be less than quick to grab the book and find the answer. I would have to wade through the book to figure out where to get the support I needed.

Still, I do recommend that everyone read this book at least once, to build their skills in negotiation. It's something we all have to do!
60 internautes sur 60 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Understanding the Art of Negotiation 17 novembre 2014
Par Marry Jane - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle
Whether you're a high-profile diplomatic official or just a burger flipper, the fact remains that we all negotiate at one point or another. Our negotiations may not be based on matters of life and death or foreign policy, but they do create actionable effects in our professional and personal life. Getting to Yes is a must-read for anyone who needs a better understanding of negotiation tactics. If you find yourself constantly making compromises that negatively affect your desired outcomes, then this book will help you. Again, this book will help virtually anyone as negotiation is a universal constant in everyone's lives. The book lays at a simple, step-by-step action plan for negotiating at higher level. Whether you're looking for a pay raise or just some leeway with your significant other, this book will help you get what you want without feeling like you get the short end of the stick every time.

Of course, negotiation strategies work only if you believe in what you're doing and believe in yourself. I picked up 21 Things You Should Give Up To Be Happy recently and it's helped me personally and in my negotiations. Part of negotiating is not worrying about what other people think of you. If you are overly concerned with how you appear, then you aren't going to become a good negotiator. One of the 21 Things You Should Give Up To Be Happy is actually caring about what people think about you. Someone's opinion of you should not affect your opinion of yourself. If you base your entire self-worth on other people's opinions, then you are doomed for a life of being stepped on and stepped over. People will take advantage of your low self-worth in personal and work relationships and negotiations. I'm glad I found this book, because it has, indeed, made me happier.

My newfound happiness and self-worth has also helped me when it comes to my negotiation strategies. I just simply follow the guidelines laid out in Getting to Yes, and I have been able to achieve my negotiation goals in all areas of my life. I am certainly a happier person because of it.
26 internautes sur 26 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A Must-Read Book 23 septembre 2012
Par Allan M. Lees - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
There are a few books that have such relevance to so many aspects of daily life that they should be on everyone's "must read" list, and this is one of them. Although at first it might seem that this is merely one more addition to the seemingly endless pile of platitudinous self-help books that crowd the bookshelves and deliver little or no real worth, in fact this book is a highly pragmatic text on the process of negotiation. The authors don't pretend that negotiating will get you everything you want - in fact they are very clear on the limitations of negotiation and how to think of negotiation as a process that has strict boundaries. What the book does is make explicit the nature of negotiation, the types of tactics people commonly use, and the most competent method for pursuing negotiations so as to maximize the possibility of achieving a negotiated outcome both parties can live with. The text is clear, the examples simple to grasp, and the conceptual framework adequately developed. Nowadays we might add some learning that evolutionary psychology has provided, but aside from that this is a superb book that can enable enhanced outcomes in most realms of life, from family conflicts through business negotiations to community issues. The entire book can be read and absorbed in less than two hours, but the lessons can be applied over a lifetime.
18 internautes sur 18 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Should be required reading for life 8 octobre 2011
Par Houman Tamaddon - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
After reading Roger Dawson's "Secrets of Power Negotiating" (another outstanding book, by the way), I did not expect to learn much new material from this book. I was wrong - "Getting to Yes" offers a new approach to negotiating. As the authors point out, we negotiate constantly in our daily lives. Most of us are unaware of the times we negotiate with our friends, coworkers, and family. What this book teaches readers is to how to go about resolving conflicts in an unemotional and logical way. Much of the advice here is given in the context of negotiating, but interestingly it could have easily been positioned as a book on influence. The material here reminded me of Dale Carnegies' "How to Win Friends and Influence People" (also a brilliant book).

I don't think that people should just read this book to get an advantage in negotiating. In fact, all sides would probably be mutually better off if they read this book. It advances civil society by promoting talk over violence and anger. I wonder why these books are not required reading for high school students. I certainly wish I had come across them when I was younger.
24 internautes sur 28 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A must read for those involved in community issues 28 juin 2012
Par Joshua P. OConner - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
The premise of Getting to Yes is relatively simple; in essence the traditional view of negotiation (as a game of "give and take" between parties) is largely unproductive and can shatter working relationships between parties. Under this traditional view, parties are forced to choose between hardline negotiations (where you attempt to force your desired outcome) and softline negotiation (where you make extreme concessions in order to preserve the relationship). The authors offer a new outlook (referred to as "principled negotiation") where all parties work to make objective and rational statements about their desired outcomes (including providing empirical reasoning for their desired outcome). This new approach (summarized in the Appendix) removes the oppositional/adversarial outlook of negotiation and works to find creative solutions which satisfy the needs of all parties involved.

The model proposed is easy to use. The first step involves detaching personal politics from negotiation. Through making the negotiation about the issue at hand, the authors claim that relationships are more likely to be preserved regardless of the outcome of the negotiation. A major element of removing personal politics from the negotiation is to focus on personal interest rather than a hard position. Expressing personal interest in more lucid terms rather than abbreviated and absolute terms (e.g. "I would like to be able to sell the house and have a capital gain that would allow me to put 20% on house X" rather than "I would like to get $160,000 for the house") allows both parties to understand the interest at play and to work to explore mutually beneficial outcomes. In addition to expressing personal interests, the authors also insist that the terms of the negotiation be expressed in objective terms (i.e. when negotiating the house price an offer would be based off of the same quantitative/qualitative comparisons used in an appraisal). Instead of throwing out arbitrary figures in order to whittle a party up or down, each party must justify their request with some particular objective fact.

As the authors conclude the book, they provide a set of "Frequently Asked Questions" that they've received since publishing the first edition of the text. Each of the questions delve into more specific detail regarding how to employ the techniques in situations where power imbalances may be at place or one party simply refuses to negotiate.

Overall, the authors use the bulk of the text to compare and contrast traditional negotiation styles with their proposed "principled" negotiation technique.
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