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Gives Light (Gives Light Series Book 1) (English Edition) [Format Kindle]

Rose Christo , indelibleCHAOS

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Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

"Skylar is my name, tragically."

Sixteen-year-old Skylar is witty, empathetic, sensitive--and mute. Skylar hasn't uttered a single word since his mother died eleven years ago, a senseless tragedy he's grateful he doesn't have to talk about.

When Skylar's father mysteriously vanishes one summer afternoon, Skylar is placed in the temporary custody of his only remaining relative, an estranged grandmother living on an Indian reservation in the middle of arid Arizona.

Adapting to a brand new culture is the least of Skylar's qualms. Because Skylar's mother did not die a peaceful death. Skylar's mother was murdered eleven years ago on the Nettlebush Reserve. And her murderer left behind a son.

And he is like nothing Skylar has ever known.

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 719 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 285 pages
  • Editeur : Rose Christo; Édition : 1 (10 juillet 2012)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B008JYCVW4
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Non activé
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°59.234 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.7 étoiles sur 5  40 commentaires
7 internautes sur 9 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 I hate coming-of-age stories 11 septembre 2012
Par Amazon Customer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
I recently picked up reading when I read the Hunger Games trilogy after I heard someone say that the books were better than the movies. It turned out that the books were very good and my favorite part was the romance between the main characters. I guess I must have been a little envious of epic heterosexual romance so I tried to find fictional books with gay leads. My short search led me to Goodreads (Google it if you want some great book recommendations), which in turn led me to a few self-published authors in the kindle store. While the stories weren't bad, they lacked the enslaving story telling that enabled me to finish reading the Hunger Games in a month or The Joy Luck Club in 2 days (way back when I was in high school). So I was sure after I finished Kim Fielding's Stasis trilogy I would only read non-self-published book (I'm sure there's a more succinct way to put it but I don't know how). So while compiling a list of books to read next, I found that 'Gives Light' was available for sampling in the Kindle store and figured I'd give it a shot. I read the sample 2 days ago...as in finished 2 chapters in 5 minutes and loved it. I promised myself I'd back get to this as soon as I finished 'Equipoise'. After about 30 minutes of trying to read that book I was on the Kindle store buying 'Gives Light'. I read the damn thing overnight and am so in love with it that I'm afraid to read the 2nd book because it might not be able to live up to my expectations.

So what's so great about it? Many things...what drew me in was my fascination with a mute character - how does he communicate? I get tired of justifying/explaining/apologizing for being gay so how does he get any understanding without a voice? But it was much more than just an interesting protagonist that kept me reading. The author kept the book moving at a natural pace - it didn't feel rushed or too slow, she described thing with so much detail that one could imagine themselves there and all the characters are depicted as fully formed human beings without any judgement. There were times when my brain protested that there was no chance one could find their 'true-love' so conveniently or that things could work out well for a gay couple without conflicts, but my heart asks why I could believe that being bitten by a spider could give you arachnid powers or that exposure to gamma radiation doesn't give you cancer but makes you green and super strong (while accidentally hurting Liv Tyler) or any other super hero scenario, but I couldn't accept this world where two men could love each other without reproach? I had no answer so I just enjoyed the book without questioning the idyllic setting which seemed as plausible as Middle earth.

In conclusion, just try the sample - it's free.
3 internautes sur 4 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Truly excellent 11 novembre 2012
Par octobercountry - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle
I've just finished the Gives Light quartet by Rose Christo. And I'll say right off that I found the books very moving. The books, in order, are 1) Gives Light 2) Looks Over 3) St. Clair 4) Why the Star Stands Still .

Here we have a study in contrasts, between two very different boys. While Skylar has a naturally outgoing and optimistic personality, the horrific attack he suffered at the age of five at the hands of his mother's murderer has left him with a scarred throat and taken away his voice, which does distance him from society to a certain extent. Rafael, the son of the murderer, is gruff and taciturn and forever an outsider on the reservation because most people only see his hated father when they look at him.

The first books tells what happens when these two meet and forge a relationship; how they change one another and help each other move past the figurative scars that are chaining them both to their pasts. And what I took away from the series as a whole is that yes---really terrible things do happen in life. But it's possible to survive disaster, to do your best to become something more and make a positive difference in the world. And that's a message worth sharing.

I've noted before that if I really care for the characters in a story, and find the situations interesting, I'm willing to overlook any number of shortcomings a novel may have. And make no mistake, I found portions of this story incredibly moving. But in this case, there weren't any major shortcomings to overlook.

Now, I'm not saying the books are perfect. I think they are well written, but occasionally I would come across a stray word that seemed like an odd choice to use. And the manuscripts could have been tightened up a bit---there's some repetition from one book to the next. Perhaps a few of the plot points seemed a bit "iffy" to me; occasionally I would think that situations wouldn't logically have worked out the way they did, and there were a couple of coincidences that, while advancing the plot, seemed extremely unlikely to me. However, due to the emotional impact the story had on me overall I can't say I had too much of a problem with these smaller issues.

The author doesn't make these novels seem like lessons, meant to instruct the reader about Native American culture---far from it. But she works in a fair amount of information throughout the stories, regarding Native American history and traditions, and what life is like on the smaller reservations today. I can honestly say that I probably learned more about indigenous peoples in the past two weeks, from reading these books, than I had in my entire life previously. The author obviously feels very strongly about certain modern-day issues and problems that Native Americans face even today, and when reading these stories the audience will share these emotions.

This series of books shows precisely how drastically publishing has changed in the past few years, since the advent of e-readers. They are self-published---which I hasten to add is not at all the same thing as the vanity presses used in the past. Since getting my Kindle, I've read quite a few self-published works. And yes----some of them are dreadful. But others are quite as good as---or even better---than the material that is coming from the big six publishing houses. (I think the trick to producing a work of professional quality---apart from innate talent, of course---is to have a good editor. And there's no reason a self-published title cannot be every bit as good as what hits the store shelves every month.) I think these stories could have used just a bit more polish, but I'm not complaining. I don't know that the big six would have touched them, perhaps thinking that their appeal wouldn't be wide enough, and that's a shame.

By all means, try the first and see what you think; if you like it, move on to the others.
3 internautes sur 4 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A rare five-star from me: an exceptional YA book 9 octobre 2012
Par Ulysses Dietz - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
This book was recommended to me on the AfterElton.com gay book forum. I resisted, but finally let him talk me into it.I a so glad I did. I've read a great many YA books with central characters who were gay. I've never read one quite like this. It is not grand, but it is almost magical in its simple, poignant, and moving narrative.

The story of this book is, ultimately, the distant aftermath of a series of horrific acts of violence, although that truth is only gradually unveiled to the reader. At first, we just have a sixteen-year old boy in a shoddy southwestern town who seems to have been abandoned by his father. Oh, and he's mute. The child protective services take him to his grandmother's house on the Nettlebush Indian reservation. There, Skylar St. Clair reestablishes contact with the people and the customs of his tribe - the Shoshone - and with him we learn the truth behind the scars on his throat and the mystery of his father's disappearance.

And then there's Rafael. Skylar's unlikely friendship with this dark, brooding boy, becomes the golden thread woven through the dark and complex tapestry of the Nettlebush saga. It is awkward in a very believable teenage way; it is romantic in a way that will touch all but the stoniest of hearts. In a world full of hate, I am always drawn to stories in which the power of love is manifest. All you need to know is that "Gives Light" is Raphael's family name to know that love will play a major role here.
3 internautes sur 4 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Superb 19 août 2012
Par Andy - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
Gives Light is an excellent novel and I eagerly await the next installment of the trilogy. The author has written an engaging novel with well developed characters and an intriguing plot.

This coming of age story centres around Skyler, a sixteen year old boy left mute by a callous act of violence eleven years previously. The story follows his life over one summer that sees him having to deal with the abandonment of his father, adapting and embracing his and his fathers Native American heritage when placed in care with his grandmother and coming to terms with same sex attraction.

I read this book in one sitting. I simply couldn't put it down. I highly recommend this novel.
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Very sweet 11 décembre 2014
Par Sadie Forsythe - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
I generally thought this was very sweet, but before I do anything else I'm going to mention one major problem I had with the book. Then I'm going to make a conscious and concerted effort to ignore it, because that's how I read the book.

Skylar is said to be 16-years-old and Rafael probably a little older. I've never been a teenage boy, but it's my understanding that at that age they are walking balls of hormones and can be expected to have become intimately familiar with "themselves" and their ever-present "urges."

Skyar and Rafael are innocents. Christo went to great pains to establish this. For example, at one early point Skylar wanted to hug someone in thanks. He acknowledges that most boys his age wouldn't, but he did. He's thus shown, to be less emotionally reserved (more child-like) than his peers. Later, Rafael saw a pack of Trojans and didn't even know what they were. I know the reservation was remote and didn't have TV and such, but I'm supposed to believe men don't talk?

Even after they fall in love (I don't think I'm spoiling anything by telling you it's a romance.) there is no sexual tension. They remain blissfully innocent of the temptations of the flesh. Another, less forgiving, reviewer called them "boy-shaped, iniquity-free automatons." It's not wholly inaccurate. I however thought all their innocence smacked of prepubescence and compromised the credibility of the book.

Now, I do understand that this is YA m/m romance and had the boys been humping like rabbits, or more realistic teenagers, it would have been a very different book and lost a little of it's lightness. I do get it. So I do understand why it's written the way it is. That's why I decided to let the issue go and focus on the rest of the plot.

But sex probably could have been addressed, or at least it could have been suggested that they even knew what it was. All the 'funny feelings in their stomachs' didn't really work as a substitute for the raging erection realism would have required.

Other than that one big issue, I basically read this book with a silly smile slapped on my face. It's sweet, that's the best word for it. Seeing Skylar find a place in the world and Rafael find someone to give him the forgiveness he's always wanted was heart warming.

I did think the characters were a little gendered, with Skylar and his disability being the weaker and therefore feminized half of the pairing. This showed in the ways Rafael, being gentlemanly, always held his hand and walked him home, but never the other way around. Skylar loved the way Rafael's arms made him feels safe and how naturally protective Rafael was of him, but never the other way around. The way Rafael was a bundle of energy and action, while Skylar was calm and sedate. The way Rafael was broad and strong, while Skylar was smaller, but long and wispy. The way Skylar chose to cook because he couldn't abide the cruelty of hunting, while Rafael was an expert hunter and outdoorsman.

None of it was overt and any one or two of those distinctions wouldn't mean anything. But taken all together it starts to feel like maybe it does.

I also thought everyone's, not only easy acceptance of their relationship, but tendency to come to Skylar unprompted to tell him they had no problem with who he loved was just too easy. Again, it was sweet that everyone was so open-minded and accepting, but it smoothed everything out with no effort on Skylar or Rafael's part. This is especially true as the book states more than once how the Shoshone way is to keep their opinions to themselves and not interfere in others' private lives.

The writing itself was beautiful. It bordered on purple on occasion, but mostly stayed on the right side of the line. I also really liked the narratives tone. It was quite witty. There was also a wonderful theme of forgiveness and the importance of community. All-in-all, I had some complaints, but I enjoyed it all the same.
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