Golf is Not a Game of Perfect et plus d'un million d'autres livres sont disponibles pour le Kindle d'Amazon. En savoir plus
EUR 15,19
  • Tous les prix incluent la TVA.
Il ne reste plus que 7 exemplaire(s) en stock (d'autres exemplaires sont en cours d'acheminement).
Expédié et vendu par Amazon.
Emballage cadeau disponible.
Quantité :1
Golf is Not a Game of Per... a été ajouté à votre Panier
Vous l'avez déjà ?
Repliez vers l'arrière Repliez vers l'avant
Ecoutez Lecture en cours... Interrompu   Vous écoutez un extrait de l'édition audio Audible
En savoir plus
Voir les 2 images

Golf is Not a Game of Perfect (Anglais) Relié – 7 mai 1996


Voir les 9 formats et éditions Masquer les autres formats et éditions
Prix Amazon Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle
"Veuillez réessayer"
Relié
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 15,19
EUR 12,98 EUR 0,29
Cassette
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 27,01 EUR 26,08
Calendrier
"Veuillez réessayer"

A court d'idées pour Noël ?

A court d'idées pour Noël ?
Découvrez dès aujourd'hui toutes nos Idées Cadeaux Livres. Vous trouverez sur nos étagères des milliers de livres disponibles pour combler ceux que vous aimez.

Offres spéciales et liens associés


Les clients ayant acheté cet article ont également acheté


Descriptions du produit

Extrait

Chapter 1

On My Interprectation of Dreams

I have two things in common with Sigmund Freud. I have a couch in my consulting room. And I ask people to tell me about their dreams. But there the resemblance ends.

The couch is in my basement rec room, near the Grounds of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. The picture frames above it hold not the psychoanalyst's carefully neutral art but a print of a golfer swinging a mid-iron and a flag from the 18th hole at Pebble Beach, signed by Jack Nicklaus, Tom Watson and Tom Kite. A four-and-one-quarter-inch putting cup, sunk into the floor, and a universal gym complete the decor. And no one lies on my couch. They sit, and we talk face to face.

Freud believed dreams were a window into the subconscious mind. From them, he spun a web of theory that, too often, boils down to a belief that people are the victims of circumstances beyond their control -- of childhood traumas, parental mistakes, and instinctive impulses.

But the dreams I ask about are not the ones that crept from the unconscious the night before. They are the goals and aspirations a golfer has been carrying around in his or her conscious mind.

The dreams I want to hear of excite some fortunate people from the time they wake up each morning until they fall asleep at night. They are the stuff of passion and tenacity. They might be defined as goals, but goals so bright that no one need write them down to remember them. In fact, the hard task for the professionals I work with is not recalling their dreams, but occasionally putting them out of their minds and taking some time off from their pursuit of them. The dreams I want to hear about are the emotional fuel that helps people take control of their lives and be what they want to be. Time and again, I have heard stories of dreams that are intimately connected to the ability to play great golf. In fact, this is the first mental principle a golfer must learn:

A person with great dreams can achieve great things.

A person with small dreams, or a person without the confidence to pursue his or her dreams, has consigned himself or herself to a life of frustration and mediocrity.

Pat Bradley had some of the most exciting dreams I have ever heard. When I first met her, in the early 1980s, she had won a number of tournaments, but she wasn't convinced she knew how to win. She wasn't even sure she was innately gifted at golf. As a kid, she had concentrated most of her attention on skiing. She hadn't won many important amateur events, and she hadn't attended a college with a great women's golf team. She was a good player who just slowly and gradually got better, until she was making a good living as a professional.

She sat on my couch and said, "I'm past thirty. I want to win more. I want to win majors. I want to be Player of the Year at least once. And I want to be in the LPGA Hall of Fame."

At that point, I didn't even know what it took to get into the LPGA Hall of Fame. I quickly learned that, in all of sports, it's the hardest Hall of Fame to enter. A golfer has to win thirty tournaments, at least one of them a major. Very few make it.

I said to myself, "Wow. This woman has a great head."

Just talking with her exhilarated me. She was so intense and so excited. She had a quest.

We worked for two days on how she could learn to see herself as a winner, to think effectively, to play one shot at a time, to believe in her putting and herself. We talked periodically thereafter, and still do.

The first year after our visit, she won five tournaments, three of them majors. She nearly won the Grand Slam of women's golf. I attended the one major she lost that year, the U.S. Women's Open in Dayton, Ohio. She lipped out putts on two of the last three holes and lost by a shot or two.

Afterward, we talked, and I told her I was glad I hadn't been carrying a million dollars with me, because I would have bet it all on her to win the Open. That was how impressive her attitude and confidence were that year.

Pat continued to win, and in 1991, with her fourth victory that year, she qualified for the LPGA Hall of Fame. The induction ceremony was at the Ritz-Carlton in Boston, and Pat invited my wife, Darlene, and me. We came into the lobby and saw Pat and her mother, Kathleen. We exchanged hugs.

"Hey, before you leave, we have to talk," she said.

"What do we need to talk about?" I asked.

She looked at me and said, "Where do we go from here? Bob, we've got to find a new dream. What's next?"

Pat is still trying to figure out what comes next. For a while, she thought that the 1996 Olympics would include golf and be played at Augusta National. She had always dreamed of playing at Augusta, and she had always dreamed of being an Olympian. The prospect of doing both fired her up, until the International Olympic Committee dropped the idea.

Now she's searching for a new dream. And she hasn't won since 1991. I know that when she seizes on a new dream, she will win again. Her dreams propel her.

I heard something similar from Byron Nelson recently. Tom Kite and I were giving a clinic at Las Colinas Country Club, outside of Dallas, and we were flattered that Byron and his wife, Peggy, showed up to listen to what we had to say.

After our presentation, during the question period, Byron raised his hand.

"People have often asked me where my mind was the year I won eleven tournaments in a row," he said. "I've never had a good answer, until now, when I listened to what you and Tom were saying about going after your dreams.

"When I was a young player, my dream was to own a ranch. Golf was the only way I was going to get that ranch. And every tournament I played in, I was going after a piece of it. First I had to buy some property. Then I had to fence it. Then I had to build a house for it. Then furnish the house. Then I had to build barns and corrals. Then animals. Then I had to hire someone to look after it while I was touring. Then I had to put enough money aside to take care of it forever.

"That was what I won tournaments for. It's amazing, but once I got that ranch all paid for, I pretty much stopped playing. I was all but done as a competitive player."

Tom Kite is a great example of a person who dreamed huge dreams, and kept dreaming them in the face of all kinds of supposed evidence that they were foolish.

A few years ago I was down at the Austin Country Club working with Tom the week before the Tournament of Champions. He had to go inside to take a phone call, and while I waited for him to return, a tall, athletic-looking man walked up to me and introduced myself.

"You're Bob Rotella, aren't you?" he asked. "What are you talking to Kite about? You know, he really thinks you're helping him."

We shook hands, and he identified himself as an old friend and competitor of Tom's from boyhood days.

"I went to high school with Tom and played golf with him," the man said. "Ben Crenshaw was right behind us. Ben won the state championship twice. I won it once. Tom never won it. I thought I was way better than him. He seemed to be always shooting three over par. How did he get so good?"

There was a long answer and a short answer to that question.

The short answer was that Tom had a dream and he never stopped chasing it.

As a boy, he was small, needed glasses, and wasn't even the best junior golfer at his club. His dream seemed so unlikely that when he was fourteen or fifteen, his parents took him to see Lionel and Jay Hebert, the former touring pros. Tom's father wanted the Hebert brothers to tell Tom something discouraging, to tell him how high the odds were against him.

The Heberts, fortunately, demurred. "He'll find out soon enough how hard it is," they said. "Let him go after it."

When Tom and I first met, dreams still motivated him. He wanted to win more tournaments, including majors. He wanted to be player of the year. He wanted to be the leading money winner.

He has fulfilled those dreams. Now he has new ones. Two days after he won the U.S. Open for the first time, he called me up. He knew what would happen when he returned to the Tour. Everyone he met would want to congratulate him. Reporters would want to interview him about the Open. Fans would mob him. Faced with those distractions, a lot of new Open champions have suffered letdowns. Tom was determined not to be one of them He wanted to test his self-discipline. He wanted to be a player who used the Open as a springboard to even better performance. And he did.

I suspect Tom will attain his new dreams as he did the old ones, because he has always been willing to do what was entailed in the long answer to the question posed by his boyhood rival.

The long answer would have recounted how hard Tom worked, on both the physical and mental aspects of his game, how often he endured failures, how often he bounced back, as he pursued those dreams.

The man I was speaking with had made a common mistake in assessing Tom. He confused golfing potential with certain physical characteristics. Most people carry in their mind an image of a golfer with potential. He is young, tall and lean. He moves with the grace of the natural athlete and probably has excelled at every sport he's ever tried. He can hit the ball over the fence at the end of the practice range.

But while I certainly wouldn't discourage someone with those physical characteristics, I've found that they have little to do with real golfing potential.

Golfing potential depends primarily on a player's attitude, on how well he plays with the wedges and the putter, and on how well he thinks.

It's nice when Tom gives me a little of the credit for his achievements, but the truth is that he had a great attitude before I ever met him. He had a backyard green and sand trap as a boy, where he developed his short game. He refused to believe he couldn't achieve his goals. Those qualities of mind were and are true talent an...

Revue de presse

Tom Kite from the foreword In the first twelve years of my life on the PGA Tour, I had established myself as a pretty decent player, but had only won five official tournaments. In the ten years since meeting Doc, I have won fourteen tournaments, played on the Ryder Cup team, and won my first major, the U.S. Open. To say that I think Doc has helped make me a better player would be an understatement.

Nick Price Bob Rotella's knowledge and practical approach to psychology have been an enormous help to me. He has an uncanny knack of being able to turn the most complicated situation into a simple one.

Pat Bradley Bob Rotella helped me to be my own best friend and to get to the next level of my career.

Brad Faxon I was at a point where I was taking golf so seriously that I wasn't enjoying it any more. Bob Rotella taught me to throw away doubt and fear, and as a result I am enjoying golf, learning more, and playing better.


Détails sur le produit

  • Relié: 320 pages
  • Editeur : Simon & Schuster (7 mai 1996)
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 068480364X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684803647
  • Dimensions du produit: 14 x 2,8 x 19 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 5.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (1 commentaire client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 96.022 en Livres anglais et étrangers (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres anglais et étrangers)
  • Table des matières complète
  •  Souhaitez-vous compléter ou améliorer les informations sur ce produit ? Ou faire modifier les images?


En savoir plus sur les auteurs

Découvrez des livres, informez-vous sur les écrivains, lisez des blogs d'auteurs et bien plus encore.

Dans ce livre (En savoir plus)
Première phrase
I HAVE TWO things in common with Sigmund Freud. Lire la première page
En découvrir plus
Concordance
Parcourir les pages échantillon
Front Cover | Copyright | Table des matières | Extrait | Quatrième de couverture
Rechercher dans ce livre:

Quels sont les autres articles que les clients achètent après avoir regardé cet article?

Commentaires en ligne

5.0 étoiles sur 5
5 étoiles
1
4 étoiles
0
3 étoiles
0
2 étoiles
0
1 étoiles
0
Voir le commentaire client
Partagez votre opinion avec les autres clients

Commentaires client les plus utiles

Par LB sur 5 septembre 2000
Format: Relié
Un livre formidable qui peut permettre à tout golfeur motivé de réaliser de gros progrès et baisser son handicap de plusieurs points en quelques mois. A lire absolument.
Remarque sur ce commentaire Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire. Si ce commentaire est inapproprié, dites-le nous.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer

Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 246 commentaires
35 internautes sur 38 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Tournament Tough 13 janvier 2000
Par Jonathan Reeder - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
This book provides incredible insight into the game of golf. Rather than attempting to teach the infamous "perfect swing," Dr. Rotella allows the reader to maintain his current swing and instead he addresses the mental side to lower scores. Whether you are a beginner or carry a low handicap, this book is sure to knock strokes off. This book enables a player to think correctly on the course and develop confidence in his game. It is easy and fun to read since Rotella recalls past memories that support his point. I'd recommend this book for yourself or as a gift. I re-read chapters nightly before playing in tournaments as an instrument to mentally prepare myself. It has helped me to win national junior events and I guarentee that it will help you as well. Hit 'em straight!
34 internautes sur 40 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Train Your Brain!!! 22 septembre 2000
Par J. Duncan - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
As a 7 handicap trying to figure out how to shave those extra strokes off to get into the low single digit territory this was a nice surprise which helped to complete my library of essential golf books.
the seminal work on golf (and perhaps) sports psychology from Dr. Bob Rotella. The book works on a number of levels as follows: #1. as a rare and excellent guide on how to prepare oneself mentally for the game and how to remained focused during a match; #2. as a series of anecdotal chapters covering a number of the game's top name players and how they are using Rotella's straight forward and insightful techniques to play better golf; #3. as an instructional piece and #4. as a guide for getting the most out of your practises.
Any one of the above would make it good, all 4 in combination make it a must have for golfers at all levels.
(ps I'd also recommend as essential golf reading Jack Nicklaus's "Golf My Way," Tom Watson's "Getting It Up and Down from 40 Yards and In" and, of course, Harvey Penick's "Little Red Book)
18 internautes sur 20 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Playing Golf in the Zone 30 août 2001
Par Gary A. Sailes - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
The most enjoyable golf you can play is effortless and pressure free. "Doc" Rotella's "Golf Is Not a Game of Perfect" has literally liberated me from myself. I was definitely in my own way, halting my own progress. My swing coach brought me from a 35 handicap to a 16 handicap in two summers. Doc brought me down to a 10 handicap in six weeks, and I am still improving. Two key facets in the book grabbed me. First is, "The best swing thought is no swing thought!" This was riveting and when I finally let go and trust my swing, the ball went longer and straighter. Consistency and lower scores were the result. The second facet dealt with putting. Doc emphasized "When you land the green, hole the put, no matter the distance!" What a confidence and result booster!! My goal was to become a single digit handicapper by the end of summer 2001. I still have three weeks to lose one stroke and achieve my goal. I am convinced it will happen. On June 26th, I had a milestone. After reading Doc's book, I shot my first ever and only sub-par round of 35 for nine holes on a par 36 executive course here in Indianapolis. I had a playing partner and asked him to sign the card. It is now framed and sitting in my office. That was fun. Thanks Doc!! -Gary in Indianapolis.
20 internautes sur 25 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Sure cure for a golfing nut case! 27 juin 2000
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
I was a mental midget on the golf course. Despite my low handicap, I was capable of shooting 90 anytime out. My swing and tempo would just go away. Sometimes only for a few holes, sometimes for a few weeks. It all had to do with my mental approach. I would go "unconscience" for weeks and shoot my standard round in the 70's, then I would wake up and decide to "think", and all of the sudden I was a mess. The guys at my club called me Jekyll or Hyde, depending on who I was that day. I won my club championship in 1995, finished 2nd in 1998, then failed to qualify by shooting 92 in 1999. I was almost ready to go to a shrink, and I considered being hypnotized.
I went to a local pro that I knew casually for a lesson, and he told me after 10 swings that I was fine physically. I told him about my troubles. He confirmed that I had mental issues on the course, and instead of nitpicking a with a solid swing, he recommended I read this book. He even gave me his copy. I got through it in 2 sittings, bought my own, and now refer to it often. I have attained a tremendous level of consistency and rediscovered my confidence. My USGA handicap has dropped back to the 4's. I am thrilled, because I went as high as 9 after a month of complete futility last season. The only reason it stayed that low was because they toss out your 10 highest scores from your last 20 rounds when computing the handicap. My average score was almost 12 shots higher than the previous year.
I don't have the vocabulary required to adequately praise this book. All I can say is BUY IT! I still can not believe what it did for me. I haven't had any funky spells since reading it, and my entire approach to the game has changed for the better.
Good luck.
19 internautes sur 24 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Golfers, go to the top of this page and buy this book now! 18 juillet 1999
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
Simply put, this book is incredible. I am a 16 year old addict, who was last year, the worst player on the school team. I had taken lessons from pros, watched instructional videos, and attended numerous golf camps. At the beginning of the this year's season, I was considering quitting, when I picked up this little treasure. Bob Rotella's book has completely changed my attitude about this wonderful game. It taught me to forget about what other people thought about my game and remember how to have fun. Due to the weather this year, our golf season was only two weeks long. It took me one week to make junior varsity, and I give half of the credit to this book, and half of the credit to me for reading it. By utilizing the mental techniques found in "Golf Is Not A Game Of Perfect," I was smashing my previous scoring records and setting new ones almost every round! I was shooting in the mid-70's (9 holes) last year, and now I consistently score in the low 40's! This fantastic book is the real deal!
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ? Dites-le-nous


Commentaires

Souhaitez-vous compléter ou améliorer les informations sur ce produit ? Ou faire modifier les images?