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Gone Girl (English Edition)
 
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Gone Girl (English Edition) [Format Kindle]

Gillian Flynn
4.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (38 commentaires client)

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Descriptions du produit

Extrait

Chapter One

Nick Dunne
the day of
 
When I think of my wife, I always think of her head. The shape of
it, to begin with. The very first time I saw her, it was the back of the
head I saw, and there was something lovely about it, the angles of it.
Like a shiny, hard corn kernel or a riverbed fossil. She had what the
Victorians would call finely shaped head. You could imagine the
skull quite easily.
 
I’d know her head anywhere.
 
And what’s inside it. I think of that too: her mind. Her brain, all
those coils, and her thoughts shuttling through those coils like fast,
frantic centipedes. Like a child, I picture opening her skull, unspooling
her brain and sifting through it, trying to catch and pin down
her thoughts. What are you thinking, Amy? The question I’ve asked
most often during our marriage, if not out loud, if not to the person
who could answer. I suppose these questions stormcloud over every
marriage: What are you thinking? How are you feeling? Who are
you? What have we done to each other? What will we do?
 
My eyes flipped open at exactly six a.m. This was no avian fluttering
of the lashes, no gentle blink toward consciousness. The awakening
was mechanical. A spooky ventriloquist- dummy click of the lids:
The world is black and then, showtime! 6- 0- 0 the clock said— in my
face, first thing I saw. 6- 0- 0. It felt different. I rarely woke at such a
rounded time. I was a man of jagged risings: 8:43, 11:51, 9:26. My
life was alarmless.
 
At that exact moment, 6- 0- 0, the sun climbed over the skyline of
oaks, revealing its full summer angry- god self. Its reflection flared
across the river toward our house, a long, blaring finger aimed at me
through our frail bedroom curtains. Accusing: You have been seen.
You will be seen.
 
I wallowed in bed, which was our New York bed in our new house,
which we still called the new house, even though we’d been back here
for two years. It’s a rented house right along the Mississippi River,
a house that screams Suburban Nouveau Riche, the kind of place
I aspired to as a kid from my split- level, shag- carpet side of town.
The kind of house that is immediately familiar: a generically grand,
unchallenging, new, new, new house that my wife would— and did—
detest.
 
“Should I remove my soul before I come inside?” Her first line upon
arrival. It had been a compromise: Amy demanded we rent, not buy,
in my little Missouri hometown, in her firm hope that we wouldn’t
be stuck here long. But the only houses for rent were clustered in
this failed development: a miniature ghost town of bank- owned,
recession- busted, price- reduced mansions, a neighborhood that closed
before it ever opened. It was a compromise, but Amy didn’t see it that
way, not in the least. To Amy, it was a punishing whim on my part, a
nasty, selfish twist of the knife. I would drag her, caveman- style, to a
town she had aggressively avoided, and make her live in the kind of
house she used to mock. I suppose it’s not a compromise if only one of
you considers it such, but that was what our compromises tended to
look like. One of us was always angry. Amy, usually.
 
Do not blame me for this particular grievance, Amy. The Missouri
Grievance. Blame the economy, blame bad luck, blame my parents,
blame your parents, blame the Internet, blame people who use the
Internet. I used to be a writer. I was a writer who wrote about TV
and movies and books. Back when people read things on paper, back
when anyone cared about what I thought. I’d arrived in New York in
the late ’90s, the last gasp of the glory days, although no one knew it
then. New York was packed with writers, real writers, because there
were magazines, real magazines, loads of them. This was back when
the Internet was still some exotic pet kept in the corner of the publishing
world— throw some kibble at it, watch it dance on its little leash,
oh quite cute, it definitely won’t kill us in the night. Think about it: a
time when newly graduated college kids could come to New York and
get paid to write. We had no clue that we were embarking on careers
that would vanish within a decade.
 
I had a job for eleven years and then I didn’t, it was that fast. All
around the country, magazines began shuttering, succumbing to
a sudden infection brought on by the busted economy. Writers (my
kind of writers: aspiring novelists, ruminative thinkers, people whose
brains don’t work quick enough to blog or link or tweet, basically old,
stubborn blowhards) were through. We were like women’s hat makers
or buggy- whip manufacturers: Our time was done. Three weeks after
I got cut loose, Amy lost her job, such as it was. (Now I can feel Amy
looking over my shoulder, smirking at the time I’ve spent discussing
my career, my misfortune, and dismissing her experience in one sentence.
That, she would tell you, is typical. Just like Nick, she would
say. It was a refrain of hers: Just like Nick to . . . whatever followed,
whatever was just like me, was bad.) Two jobless grown- ups, we spent
weeks wandering around our Brooklyn brownstone in socks and pajamas,
ignoring the future, strewing unopened mail across tables and
sofas, eating ice cream at ten a.m. and taking thick afternoon naps.
 
Then one day the phone rang. My twin sister was on the other
end. Margo had moved back home after her own New York layoff
a year before— the girl is one step ahead of me in everything, even
shitty luck. Margo, calling from good ole North Carthage, Missouri,
from the house where we grew up, and as I listened to her voice, I
saw her at age ten, with a dark cap of hair and overall shorts, sitting
on our grandparents’ back dock, her body slouched over like an old
pillow, her skinny legs dangling in the water, watching the river fl ow
over fish- white feet, so intently, utterly self- possessed even as a child.
Go’s voice was warm and crinkly even as she gave this cold news:
Our indomitable mother was dying. Our dad was nearly gone— his
(nasty) mind, his (miserable) heart, both murky as he meandered
toward the great gray beyond. But it looked like our mother would
beat him there. About six months, maybe a year, she had. I could tell
that Go had gone to meet with the doctor by herself, taken her studious
notes in her slovenly handwriting, and she was teary as she tried
to decipher what she’d written. Dates and doses.
 
“Well, fuck, I have no idea what this says, is it a nine? Does that
even make sense?” she said, and I interrupted. Here was a task, a
purpose, held out on my sister’s palm like a plum. I almost cried with
relief.
 
 “I’ll come back, Go. We’ll move back home. You shouldn’t have to
do this all by yourself.”
 
She didn’t believe me. I could hear her breathing on the other end.
 
“I’m serious, Go. Why not? There’s nothing here.”
 
A long exhale. “What about Amy?”
 
That is what I didn’t take long enough to consider. I simply assumed
I would bundle up my New York wife with her New York interests,
her New York pride, and remove her from her New York parents—
leave the frantic, thrilling futureland of Manhattan behind— and
transplant her to a little town on the river in Missouri, and all would
be fine.
 
I did not yet understand how foolish, how optimistic, how, yes,
just like Nick I was for thinking this. The misery it would lead to.
 
“Amy will be fine. Amy . . .” Here was where I should have said,
“Amy loves Mom.” But I couldn’t tell Go that Amy loved our mother,
because after all that time, Amy still barely knew our mother. Their
few meetings had left them both baffled. Amy would dissect the conversations
for days after—“And what did she mean by . . . ,” as if my
mother were some ancient peasant tribeswoman arriving from the
tundra with an armful of raw yak meat and some buttons for bartering,
trying to get something from Amy that wasn’t on offer.
 
Amy didn’t care to know my family, didn’t want to know my
birthplace, and yet for some reason, I thought moving home would
be a good idea.
 
My morning breath warmed the pillow, and I changed the subject in
my mind. Today was not a day for second- guessing or regret, it was a
day for doing. Downstairs, I could hear the return of a long- lost sound:
Amy making breakfast. Banging wooden cupboards (rump- thump!),
rattling containers of tin and glass (ding- ring!), shuffling and sorting
a collection of metal pots and iron pans (ruzz-shuzz!). A culinary
orchestra tuning up, clattering vigorously toward the finale, a cake
pan drumrolling along the floor, hitting the wall with a cymballic
crash. Something impressive was being created, probably a crepe,
because crepes are special, and today Amy would want to cook something
special.
 
It was our five- year anniversary.
 
I walked barefoot to the edge of the steps and stood listening,
working my toes into the plush wall- to- wall carpet Amy detested on
principle, as I tried to decide whether I was ready to join my wife.
Amy was in the kitchen, oblivious to my hesitation. She was humming
something melancholy and familiar. I strained to make it out— a folk
song? a lullabye?—and then realized it was the theme to M*A*S*H.
Suicide is painless. I went downstairs.
 
I hovered in the doo...

Revue de presse

“Ice-pick-sharp… Spectacularly sneaky… Impressively cagey… Gone Girl is Ms. Flynn’s dazzling breakthrough. It is wily, mercurial, subtly layered and populated by characters so well imagined that they’re hard to part with — even if, as in Amy’s case, they are already departed. And if you have any doubts about whether Ms. Flynn measures up to Patricia Highsmith’s level of discreet malice, go back and look at the small details. Whatever you raced past on a first reading will look completely different the second time around.”
—Janet Maslin, New York Times

“An ingenious and viperish thriller… It’s going to make Gillian Flynn a star… The first half of Gone Girl is a nimble, caustic riff on our Nancy Grace culture and the way in which ''The butler did it'' has morphed into ''The husband did it.'' The second half is the real stunner, though. Now I really am going to shut up before I spoil what instantly shifts into a great, breathless read. Even as Gone Girl grows truly twisted and wild, it says smart things about how tenuous power relations are between men and women, and how often couples are at the mercy of forces beyond their control. As if that weren’t enough, Flynn has created a genuinely creepy villain you don't see coming. People love to talk about the banality of evil. You’re about to meet a maniac you could fall in love with.”
Jeff Giles, Entertainment Weekly

“An irresistible summer thriller with a twisting plot worthy of Alfred Hitchcock. Burrowing deep into the murkiest corners of the human psyche, this delectable summer read will give you the creeps and keep you on edge until the last page.”
—People (four stars)

“[A] thoroughbred thriller about the nature of identity and the terrible secrets that can survive and thrive in even the most intimate relationships. Gone Girl begins as a whodunit, but by the end it will have you wondering whether there’s any such thing as a who at all.”
Lev Grossman, Time

“How did things get so bad? That’s the reason to read this book. Gillian Flynn — whose award-winning Dark Places and Sharp Objects also shone a dark light on weird and creepy, not to mention uber dysfunctional characters — delves this time into what happens when two people marry and one spouse has no idea who their beloved really is.”
USA Today, Carol Memmott

“It’s simply fantastic: terrifying, darkly funny and at times moving. The minute I finished it I wanted to start it all over again. Admirers of Gillian Flynn’s previous books, Sharp Objects and Dark Places, will be ecstatic over Gone Girl, her most intricately twisted and deliciously sinister story, dangerous for any reader who prefers to savor a novel as opposed to consuming it whole in one sitting….”
Associated Press, Michelle Weiner

“Gillian Flynn’s third novel is both breakneck-paced thriller and masterful dissection of marital breakdown… Wickedly plotted and surprisingly thoughtful, this is a terrifically good read.”
Boston Globe

“That adage of no one knows what goes on behind closed doors moves the plot of Gone Girl, Gillian Flynn's suspenseful psychological thriller… Flynn's unpredictable plot of Gone Girl careens down an emotional highway where this couple dissects their marriage with sharp acumen… Flynn has shown her skills at gripping tales and enhanced character studies since her debut Sharp Objects, which garnered an Edgar nod, among other nominations. Her second novel Dark Places made numerous best of lists. Gone Girl reaffirms her talent.” 
South Florida Sun-Sentinel, Oline Cogdill

“A great crime novel, however, is an unstable thing, entertainment and literature suspended in some undetermined solution. Take Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl, the third novel by one of a trio of contemporary women writers (the others are Kate Atkinson and Tana French) who are kicking the genre into a higher gear… You couldn’t say that this is a crime novel that’s ultimately about a marriage, which would make it a literary novel in disguise. The crime and the marriage are inseparable. As Gone Girl works itself up into an aria of ingenious, pitch-black comedy (or comedic horror — it’s a bit of both), its very outlandishness teases out a truth about all magnificent partnerships: Sometimes it’s your enemy who brings out the best in you, and in such cases, you want to keep him close.”
Salon
 
“Ms. Flynn writes dark suspense novels that anatomize violence without splashing barrels of blood around the pages… But as in her other books, Ms. Flynn has much more up her sleeve than a simple missing-person case. As Nick and Amy's alternately tell their stories, marriage has never looked so menacing, narrators so unreliable.” 
Wall Street Journal

“A portrait of a marriage so hilariously terrifying, it will make you have a good hard think about who the person on the other side of the bed really is. This novel is so bogglingly twisty, we can only give you the initial premise: on their fifth anniversary, Nick Dunne’s beloved wife Amy disappears, and all signs point to very foul play indeed. Nick has to clear his name before the police finger him for Amy’s murder.”
Time

“Readers who prefer more virulent strains of unreality will appreciate the sneaky mind games of Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl, a thriller rooted in the portrait of a tricky and troubled marriage.”
New York Times

“[Flynn has] quite outdone herself with a tale of marital strife so deliciously devious that it moves the finish line on The War of the Roses… A novel studded with disclosures and guided by purposeful misdirection… Flynn delivers a wickedly clever cultural commentary as well as a complex and driven mystery… What fun this novel is.”
New York Daily News
 
“Flynn’s brilliantly constructed and consistently absorbing third novel begins on the Dunnes’ fifth wedding anniversary… The novel, which twists itself into new shapes, works as a page-turning thriller, but it’s also a study of marriage at its most destructive.”
Columbus Dispatch
 
“Gillian Flynn's barbed and brilliant Gone Girl has two deceitful, disturbing, irresistible narrators and a plot that twists so many times you'll be dizzy. This "catastrophically romantic" story about Nick and Amy is a "fairy tale reverse transformation" that reminded me of Patricia Highsmith in its psychological suspense and Kate Atkinson in its insanely clever plotting.”
Minneapolis Star-Tribune
 
“For a creepy, suspenseful mystery, Ms. Pearl suggested Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn, a novel due out this week. "You will not be able to figure out the end at all. I could not sleep the night after I read it. It's really good," Ms. [Nancy] Pearl said. "It's about the way we deceive ourselves and deceive others."”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

“Gillian Flynn's new novel, Gone Girl, is that rare thing: a book that thrills and delights while holding up a mirror to how we live… Through her two ultimately unreliable narrators, Flynn masterfully weaves the slow trickle of critical details with 90-degree plot turns… Timely, poignant and emotionally rich, Gone Girl will peel away your comfort levels even as you root for its protagonists—despite your best intuition.”
San Francisco Chronicle
 
“Flynn’s third noir thriller recently launched to even more acclaim than the first two novels, polishing her reputation for pushing crime fiction to a new literary level and as a craftsman of deliciously twisting and twisted plots.”
Kansas City Star
 
“I picked up Gone Girl because the novel is set along the Mississippi River in Missouri and the plot sounded intriguing. I put it down two days later, bleary-eyed and oh-so-satisfied after reading a story that left me surprised, disgusted, and riveted by its twists and turns… A good story presents a reader with a problem that has to be resolved and a few surprises along the way. A great story gives a reader a problem and leads you along a path, then dumps you off a cliff and into a jungle of plot twists, character revelations and back stories that you could not have imagined. Gone Girl does just that.”
St. Louis Post-Dispatch

“To call Gillian Flynn's new novel almost review-proof isn't a put-down, it's a fact. That's because to give away the turn-of-the-screw in this chilling portrait of a marriage gone wrong would be a crime. I can say that Gone Girl is an ingenious whodunit for both the Facebook generation and old-school mystery buffs. Whoever you are, it will linger, like fingerprints on a gun… Flynn's characters bloom and grow, like beautiful, poisonous plants. She is a Gothic storyteller for the Internet age.”
Cleveland Plain Dealer

“The setup of Gone Girl lulls readers with what appears to be a done-too-often plot, but, oh, how misleading that is. This thriller is told in alternating voices, a risky form of narrative that works masterfully here because th...

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10 internautes sur 10 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Laissez-vous emporter dans la spirale infernale! 27 février 2013
Par Jean-Luc TOP 500 COMMENTATEURS
Format:Relié|Achat vérifié
Primé 20 meilleurs livres 2012 sur Amazon.com, je me suis laissé tenté et j'ai adoré.
Le mystère se dévoile peu à peu comme un objet précieux emballé dans de fines couches de papier superposées.
Dans la première moitié du roman on à le sentiment d'être monté dans un rollercoaster qui n'en finit pas de nous emporter de plus en plus haut avec une tension intensément palpable jusqu'au paroxisme...
Puis...c'est la descente, en une spirale infernale, dans une puissante exploration des extrêmes que peuvent revêtir les rapports de couple. L'amour et la haine n'ont jamais été si proches, la force de notre part d'ombre si aiguisée. L'exploration de l'âme humaine est saisissante, décrite avec une intelligence subtile pour lui donner vie dans toute sa complexité.
Un véritable tour de force qui mélange habilement polar et thriller psychologique.
L'écriture est délicieusement soignée et minutieusement travaillée.
Le récit est très habilement construit avec une narration subjective qui alterne à un rythme judicieusement choisi entre les deux protagonistes.
On aurait peut-être aimé toutefois que ces deux récits alternés soient un peu plus différenciés dans le style d'écriture (cela reste très personnel ).

Bref : De l'excellente littérature qui nous emporte dans des ambiances puissantes et saisissantes, avec des personnages d'une exceptionnelle profondeur psychologique et une histoire très prenante.
BRAVO et MERCI Madame Flynn.
MAJ 17.3 2014: Gone Girl est aussi un film américain de David Fincher prévu pour 2014
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3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 SINGULARLY UNFORGETTABLE 21 août 2012
Par Gail Cooke TOP 1000 COMMENTATEURS
Format:CD
We understand that Oregon native Julia Whelan fell in love with acting when at the age of six she went to a Shakespeare festival. That love and enthusiasm for her profession is clearly seen in the many television shows in which she has appeared. This super charged thriller gives her one more opportunity to showcase her talent, and she does so in spades.

Pairing her with film and television actor Kirby Heyborne was certainly a coup as together they inhabit the personas of Amy and Nick Dunne, a married couple who are not at all as they seem.

To friends, neighbors and the world they're a perfect couple, happily married and in love with each other. Once an about-town New York couple they've retreated to Nick's hometown of North Carthage, Missouri, after he loses his job. Once there Nick partners with his sister, Margo, in buying a local bar. He also teaches a creative writing course at a nearby college. Amy keeps wearing a contented happy face although she secretly dislikes the town, and as we later learn from her diary excerpts she also doesn't very much like her marriage. You see, we have to learn about Amy from her diary because as our story opens it is her fifth wedding anniversary and she has disappeared.

At first friends and neighbors join in sympathy for Nick and in searches for Amy. But then as Nick's reaction to her disappearance is not what they would have expected people begin to question and eventually turn against him. He has told lies. He has taken one of his students as his mistress. It is also true that his marriage was not all he and Amy presented it to be. The detectives investigating the case begin probing deeper and deeper.
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2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Surprise et suspense 22 août 2012
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
LE livre est vraiment simplement écrit, en un bon anglais et très comprensible!
En suite, il est plein de surprises et suspence: je l'ai lu très vitement.
L'histoire n'est pas trop original mais l'auteur a bien réussi à l'écrire comme si il était la première fois de ce sujet!
Je vous le conseille (surtout aux personne qui veulent lire un peu d'anglais pour mieux l'apprendre).
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6 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Roman palpitant mais une fin ratée. 4 octobre 2012
Format:Relié|Achat vérifié
La plupart des critiques sur Amazon.com sont trés élogieuses et j'ai acheté ce livre aussi sur la recommandation enthousiaste d'Olivia de Télématin. On pense que l'on va plonger dans un polar traditionnel, puisque la femme de Nick, Amy, disparait et tout semble indiquer qu'il y a eu une lutte violente. La police fait de Nick le suspect numéro un à cause d'un faisceau de preuves circonstantielles, mais il s'évertue à clamer son innocence. Est-elle morte assassinée? Le roman se déroule sur deux voies parallèles qui alternent rapidement, le récit en temps réel de Nick et le journal intime d'Amy avant sa disparition. Cet exposé des deux histoires est extrèmement habile d'autant plus qu'on se rend compte qu'Amy, folle de jalousie, est une cruelle manipulatrice. Malheureusement la fin est trés décevante, car aprés tout ce suspense le dénouement tombe complètement à plat comme si Gillian Flynn s'était enfermée dans son édifice et n'a plus su comment en sortir. Donc 5 étoiles pour la structure du récit et les personnages, mais une seulement pour la fin.
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Commentaires client les plus récents
4.0 étoiles sur 5 bon livre
Bon livre, assez original et avec du suspens car il change de directions lorsque l'on ne s'y attend pas. Je recommande
Publié il y a 8 jours par Julie BAILLY-CHARNEAU
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Gone Girl
An enjoyable read, where the characters were well portrayed, but twists in the plot were too predictable to make it gripping.
Publié il y a 12 jours par mike ainsworth
4.0 étoiles sur 5 A very good book
Extremely well written, full of surprising twists, a little bit out of breath at the end but a very enjoyable book overall.
Publié il y a 15 jours par Pfempf
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Roman palpitant aux personnages bien léchés
J'ai beaucoup aimé ce roman de Gillian Flynn. C'est plus un thriller qu'un polar mais ok. Comme dans tout bon thriller, il y a une histoire qui tient la route (bon là... Lire la suite
Publié il y a 1 mois par Nolwennsarah
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Très bien pendant les deux tiers du livre...
Puis l'intrigue bascule dans une direction totalement improbable, incompatible à mon sens avec la psychologie des personnages. Lire la suite
Publié il y a 1 mois par Paul Watine
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Tout va bien... jusqu'à la fin
On se laisse porter pendant 300 ou 400 pages. L'écriture est agréable, les personnages bien campés, les dialogues très vivants. Lire la suite
Publié il y a 2 mois par Jean
2.0 étoiles sur 5 Gone girl de Gillian Flynn
Trop lent et décousu; je trouve que ce roman est statique; j'attendais plus d'action et de rythme.Je n'ai pas bien saisi la fin du roman.
Publié il y a 2 mois par fraikin anne
2.0 étoiles sur 5 Insuffisant
J'ai acheté ce livre par rapport aux bonnes critiques et je suis déçue.
Très bon début prometteur, les personnages sont bien choisis et... Lire la suite
Publié il y a 3 mois par C. Armstrong
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Excellent read
very well written thriller.
fascinating to penetrate the mind of the main characters.
recommended read, entertaining and disturbing in once
Publié il y a 3 mois par David Sarfati
1.0 étoiles sur 5 Disappointing
This is a book that promises more than it gives. It is a psychological thriller, no question. But the enticement does not deliver. I finished with a "so that's it" feeling.
Publié il y a 3 mois par Bookworm
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