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ESV Gospel Transformation Bible [Format Kindle]

ESV Bibles by Crossway

Prix conseillé : EUR 18,81 De quoi s'agit-il ?
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  • Longueur : 1904 pages
  • Langue : Anglais
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Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

The apostle Paul summed up his whole ministry as existing “to testify to the gospel of the grace of God” (Acts 20:24). That single-minded goal is the heartbeat of the ESV Gospel Transformation Bible. Produced out of the conviction that the Bible is a unified message of God’s grace culminating in Jesus, it is a significant new tool to help readers see Christ in all the Bible, and grace for all of life.

The Gospel Transformation Bible features all-new book introductions and gospel-illuminating  notes written by a team of over 50 outstanding pastors and scholars. This specially prepared material outlines passage-by-passage God’s redemptive purposes of grace that echo all through Scripture and culminate in Christ. The notes not only explain but also apply the text in a grace-centered way. Focusing on heart transformation rather than mere behavior modification, their points of application emphasize the Hows and Whys of practical application to daily living—in short, how the gospel transforms us from the inside out.

The Gospel Transformation Bible will equip both new and seasoned believers with a gospel-centered reading of Scripture, enabling God’s people to see that the message of the Bible is a unified one—“to testify to the gospel of the grace of God.” 

  • Black letter text
  • Double-column, paragraph format
  • Book introductions
  • Gospel transformation study notes
  • Introductory essay
  • Concordance
  • 80,000 cross-references

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 23703 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 1904 pages
  • Editeur : Crossway Bibles; Édition : 1 (30 septembre 2013)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B00FIW1IV0
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83 internautes sur 84 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A Study Bible for the Heart 30 septembre 2013
Par Jason Chamberlain - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
If you run in the T4G/TGC/Challies/Justin Taylor circles you have certainly heard about the "Gospel-Centered" hermeneutic. Crossway produced this study Bible to help us to be Gospel-Centered by showing us Christ in all of Scripture. Unlike some study Bibles, you've probably even heard of most of the contributors. There are men like Miles Van Pelt (Kings and Chronicles), Michael Horton (Joshua), Darrin Patrick (Zephaniah), Kevin DeYoung (Ephesians), and JD Greear (Titus) as well as women like Elyse Fitzpatrick (Esther). The contributors include a mixture of scholars and popular authors. All their contributions went through the editing of Brian Chapell and Dane Ortlund. I recognized about 2/3 of the names and they are all very solid, conservative evangelical voices.

The book itself is quite striking. The hardcover is black with red and black stitching in the Smyth-sewn binding. The pastedowns and flyleaves are also a brilliant blood red. The Bible text is in the familiar Lexicon font, while the study notes are in Gotham. This gives it a fresh look from other study Bibles I've used. I rather liked it, despite the two-column format, which really can't be helped in a work like this. It really is a beautiful book. It also has the standard features you'd expect from an ESV such as maps in the back, the ESV reading plan, and even a topical index.

Of course, all this is meaningless if the content doesn't match the beauty of the book. To me, the biggest red flag when thinking about a "Gospel-Centered" hermeneutic comes in the story of the floating axe head in 2 Kings 6. There are some who say that the floating axe head reminds us of baptism while the stick Elisha used reminds us of the cross. The editors make a point in the introduction that they would not allow baseless allegories to dominate the notes, and they were true to their word. Nothing like that can be found in this story. Instead, the note I see is on 6:15-17, which is the story of Elisha's servant having his eyes opened to see the chariots of fire around the city. The note makes the point that we say that we would have more faith if we could just see like that, but then reminds us that we already have in the Incarnation of Christ. That is a wonderful way to apply this story.

But what about a book that seems less practical for living like Leviticus? Just about every page has a note and they deal with how the sacrifices in Leviticus point forward to the ultimate sacrifice Christ paid on the cross. The notes also emphasize the problem of sin, which is why we needed to have sacrifices. There is a note on 5:14-6:7 which connects the laws for guilt offerings with how Paul applies this to believers in 1 Corinthians 6:18 and Ephesians 1:7. There is a note on 13:1-14:57, which describes the laws about leprosy. This note reminds us of how Christ dealt with this impurity by simply touching the diseased person and making him clean. There are notes that discuss how the atoning sacrifices in Leviticus point us to the atonement that happened for believers at the cross. There are notes that show how the Israelites were to be different from the other nations just as Christians are to be different from unbelievers today. In short, these notes take what is often seen as an esoteric book and make it intensely practical for us today.

Anyone who has studied Hebrews probably already knows that Leviticus points us pretty clearly to Christ, but what about something harder like Proverbs? Take Proverbs 15:15 which reads, "All the days of the afflicted are evil, but the cheerful of heart has a continual feast." I don't immediately see the gospel in this, but the note reminds me that the joy of Christ is ultimate and victorious. In other words, there may be real sorrow in this world, but the Christian has ultimate hope and joy in Christ. Again, this is a very solid, sane way of looking at this verse. I don't think it is a stretch at all to get that from this verse.

The New Testament notes are just as good. The note on Romans 9:19-24 reminds us of the comfort that we have in knowing that God is absolutely sovereign over our salvation, whether we fully understand how it all works or not. The note on Ephesians 2:4-5 reminds us that "We were not strugglers in need of a helping hand or sinking swimmers in need of a raft; we were stone-cold dead--spiritually lifeless, without a religious pulse, without anything to please God. But he loves the loveless, gives life to the lifeless, and is merciful to those deserving no mercy." The note on Revelation 20:1-10 doesn't get into debates on the millenium, but stresses the need for the believer to remain vigilant. While I certainly didn't read every note, all the notes I did were similarly excellent.

As you can see, the notes in this Bible are extremely practical for the believer without getting into the foolishness of "4 steps to a better marriage" that pervades so many pulpits today. Many may wonder how to make "Gospel-Centered" preaching relevant to the 21st century ear. I would recommend that they read through this bible to get their answer. In fact, I would recommend this bible to anyone who wants to have all of Scripture come alive for them.

The closest analogy I can think of is that this is like the The Jesus Storybook Bible: Every Story Whispers His Name, but for grown-ups. I loved reading that bible to my kids when they were little because it edified me to see how all the familiar stories pointed to Christ. Go much deeper with that concept and you have the heart of the ESV Gospel Transformation Bible. From what I've seen, I don't think that I can recommend this too highly.

Note - the publisher gave me a copy to review.
34 internautes sur 38 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A Study Bible That is Truly Gospel Drenched 2 octobre 2013
Par Dr. David P. Craig - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
What's Unique About The Kindle Format of The Gospel Transformation Bible?

Like most Kindle books all the study notes, footnotes, and cross references are represented as links in blue highlights. Therefore, it's not like a paperback Bible or Hardback Bible where the notes are included at the bottom of each page. The beginning of each book of the Bible has each new section highlighted in blue. For example, Genesis has all 50 chapters highlighted in blue and by clicking on the chapter it will take you immediately to that chapter. Also, highlighted in blue at the beginning of each book are 6 sections: (1) An Introduction to each book of the Bible; (2) Author and Date; (3) The Audience the Book is addressed to; (4) The Gospel in "Genesis" or whatever book you are studying; (5) An outline of the book; and (6) Study notes for that book. If you are reading Genesis 30 and want to see the notes for that chapter the easiest way is to simply click on the blue notes in the text and that will take you to each note for the passage of study. There are "back" buttons to take you back to the passage you were reading in Genesis 30. It's a little cumbersome - it would have been better to have the notes on the same page, but if you are used to clicking the numbers for footnotes when you read on Kindle - you will be used to this process. The rest of my review will focus on the uniqueness of this outstanding gospel saturated resource.

What's Unique About the Gospel Transformation Bible's Notes?

(1) It's unique in how it handles applying the Scriptures. There are many good application study Bibles on the market today. Most of these Bibles focus on two aspects of application: (a) What should we do according to what this passage is teaching? and (b) Where should we be applying these truths? The Gospel Transformation Bible is unique in that it helps you focus on two other important elements of application: (c) Why we should apply the gospel daily; and (d) How we can apply the gospel daily. It guides us in having a proper motivation for obeying God - out of gratitude for His amazing grace. It also demonstrates how we are enabled by the power of the gospel to do what God calls us to do.

(2) It's unique in the fact that it shows how all the major themes of the Scriptures are integrated and how all these themes ultimately point to or find their fulfillment in the Lord Jesus Christ.

(3) It's unique in that it shows how each passage is a part of the flow of the gospel in the immediate context, but also in the over all thrust of redemptive history in the rest of the Bible.

(4) It's unique in that it demonstrates how the good news of the gospel is just as evident in the Old Testament as in the New Testament.

(5) It's unique in demonstrating how the message of the Bible about God's love promises, points to, and culminates in Jesus.

(6) It's unique in showing how the finished work of Christ matters not only in relationship to our past and our future, but especially in the present. We need the power of the gospel to help us in all the difficult realities of life - suffering, pain, decision making, identity issues, and so forth.

(7) It's unique in that it demonstrate how the grace God pervades all of Scripture and empowers us to stand firm in the gospel over the attacks we face daily with the world, the flesh, and the Devil.

(8) It's unique in that it gives us pointers to Christ and to the gospel in places that we wouldn't be naturally inclined to see them (Much like the Ethiopian eunuch in Acts 8 who didn't understand how Isaiah was talking about Jesus).

(9) It's unique in that it helps you focus on the big idea that the comprehensive theme that ties the 66 books of the Bible all together is the unfolding narrative of God's commitment to redeem a family from every language, tribe, and people group and make all things new through Jesus. The notes show how every passage in every chapter of every book in the Bible unfolds the plan of redemption through the gospel.

(10) It's unique in that it helps you delight in finding Christ for yourself in the text, and seek to be transformed into his likeness out of gratitude for His amazing grace displayed time and again in the gospel. In other words the notes focus on information (knowledge) that transforms the heart (emotions and the will). It isn't about duty, so much as delight over who God is and what He has provided for us in the gospel of Christ.

(11) It's unique in that the scholar's who write the introductions and notes to each book of the Bible articulate how each author focuses on how the particulars of each book reveals and unfolds the grace of God and how their message transforms the heart.

(12) It's unique in that the notes are targeted at the heart so that your heart is transformed by the Knowldge of the greatness of the gospel. It's about our identity in Christ and that we serve Him out of our renewed affections for Who God is and what He has done for us through Christ's Person and work. It is not so much about what you do, or what you know, but about who you "are" in Christ.

The Book of Daniel As An Example

Our temptation or inclination is to typically focus on the prophetic aspects (controversies) of the book of Daniel, or the heroism of Daniel and his friends as exiles in Babylon. The Bible in other words is about information or about us. However, Daniel is really about the people of God who are in exile in a pagan environment. However, in the midst of that exile Daniel and his friends remember that God has given them His Word and that He will be faithful to His promises. Daniel and his friends trust God even when they can't take care of themselves. The message of Daniel is a message of grace. It is the message that God provides for Daniel and his friends what they can't provide for themselves. Daniel's trust and hope lie not in his own wisdom and strength, but in the wisdom, promises, and character of his God. It is in believing in God's promises and grace that Daniel gets his strength.

What we learn from Daniel is that as the grace of God was revealed to him in the past, present, and future, so can we hope in the promises of God which are ultimately fulfilled in Christ. God demonstrates his faithfulness to Daniel and to us through His revealed prophecies and promises which are found in the coming of Christ. Daniel isn't primarily about heroism or prophecy, but about the grace of God that culminates in the gospel of Christ. Our hope as exiles in this world is the same. Our hope is in the gospel which frees us from our past, empowers us for today, and gives us hope for the future.

10 Reasons I Recommend The Gospel Transformation Bible

(1) It will help you see the types, promises, and promises of God in the Old Testament that are ultimately fulfilled in Jesus Christ.

(2) It will give you guiding principles for studying how each passage, book, and period of the Bible unfolds the theme of redemption from Genesis to Revelation.

(3) It will impact your affections for Christ and the gospel. You will be touched by the majestic and intimate grace of God for you.

(4) It will motivate you to share the gospel with others. It will re-ignite an excitement in you for the gospel that will overflow out of your heart to your mouth with those who don't know about Jesus.

(5) It will help you to see that all of the Scriptures are about Jesus. You will learn how to see Jesus through the "Jesus lens" as you read the Old and New Testament's.

(7) It will help you become less legalistic or irreligious. It will help you to understand God's grace in such a way that you become a more gracious and balanced individual.

(8) It will help you see the big picture of the Bible. It's kind of like putting a bunch of pieces together of a large puzzle without the picture. When you read through all the notes in this Bible you will see a beautiful tapestry of Christ - and that He was there all along. He longs for you to discover and bask in His grace.

(9) It will renew and excitement in you for Bible study - and not just to know more doctrine, but because you will find yourself becoming more like Jesus. It will help to transform your character as you are conforming to the image of Christ.

(10) It will help you to personally know God more intimately. You may fall in love with God for the first time, or may rekindle your love for Him. Because you will find in the notes how the message of the Bible and all of history, and meaning itself finds its culmination in a love relationship with God through Christ Jesus.
29 internautes sur 33 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 How The Gospel is Revealed in All 66 Books of the Bible 29 septembre 2013
Par Dr. David P. Craig - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié|Achat vérifié
What's Unique About the Gospel Transformation Bible's Notes?

(1) It's unique in how it handles applying the Scriptures. There are many good application study Bibles on the market today. Most of these Bibles focus on two aspects of application: (a) What should we do according to what this passage is teaching? and (b) Where should we be applying these truths? The Gospel Transformation Bible is unique in that it helps you focus on two other important elements of application: (c) Why we should apply the gospel daily; and (d) How we can apply the gospel daily. It guides us in having a proper motivation for obeying God - out of gratitude for His amazing grace. It also demonstrates how we are enabled by the power of the gospel to do what God calls us to do.

(2) It's unique in the fact that it shows how all the major themes of the Scriptures are integrated and how all these themes ultimately point to or find their fulfillment in the Lord Jesus Christ.

(3) It's unique in that it shows how each passage is a part of the flow of the gospel in the immediate context, but also in the over all thrust of redemptive history in the rest of the Bible.

(4) It's unique in that it demonstrates how the good news of the gospel is just as evident in the Old Testament as in the New Testament.

(5) It's unique in demonstrating how the message of the Bible about God's love promises, points to, and culminates in Jesus.

(6) It's unique in showing how the finished work of Christ matters not only in relationship to our past and our future, but especially in the present. We need the power of the gospel to help us in all the difficult realities of life - suffering, pain, decision making, identity issues, and so forth.

(7) It's unique in that it demonstrate how the grace God pervades all of Scripture and empowers us to stand firm in the gospel over the attacks we face daily with the world, the flesh, and the Devil.

(8) It's unique in that it gives us pointers to Christ and to the gospel in places that we wouldn't be naturally inclined to see them (Much like the Ethiopian eunuch in Acts 8 who didn't understand how Isaiah was talking about Jesus).

(9) It's unique in that it helps you focus on the big idea that the comprehensive theme that ties the 66 books of the Bible all together is the unfolding narrative of God's commitment to redeem a family from every language, tribe, and people group and make all things new through Jesus. The notes show how every passage in every chapter of every book in the Bible unfolds the plan of redemption through the gospel.

(10) It's unique in that it helps you delight in finding Christ for yourself in the text, and seek to be transformed into his likeness out of gratitude for His amazing grace displayed time and again in the gospel. In other words the notes focus on information (knowledge) that transforms the heart (emotions and the will). It isn't about duty, so much as delight over who God is and what He has provided for us in the gospel of Christ.

(11) It's unique in that the scholar's who write the introductions and notes to each book of the Bible articulate how each author focuses on how the particulars of each book reveals and unfolds the grace of God and how their message transforms the heart.

(12) It's unique in that the notes are targeted at the heart so that your heart is transformed by the Knowldge of the greatness of the gospel. It's about our identity in Christ and that we serve Him out of our renewed affections for Who God is and what He has done for us through Christ's Person and work. It is not so much about what you do, or what you know, but about who you "are" in Christ.

The Book of Daniel As An Example

Our temptation or inclination is to typically focus on the prophetic aspects (controversies) of the book of Daniel, or the heroism of Daniel and his friends as exiles in Babylon. The Bible in other words is about information or about us. However, Daniel is really about the people of God who are in exile in a pagan environment. However, in the midst of that exile Daniel and his friends remember that God has given them His Word and that He will be faithful to His promises. Daniel and his friends trust God even when they can't take care of themselves. The message of Daniel is a message of grace. It is the message that God provides for Daniel and his friends what they can't provide for themselves. Daniel's trust and hope lie not in his own wisdom and strength, but in the wisdom, promises, and character of his God. It is in believing in God's promises and grace that Daniel gets his strength.

What we learn from Daniel is that as the grace of God was revealed to him in the past, present, and future, so can we hope in the promises of God which are ultimately fulfilled in Christ. God demonstrates his faithfulness to Daniel and to us through His revealed prophecies and promises which are found in the coming of Christ. Daniel isn't primarily about heroism or prophecy, but about the grace of God that culminates in the gospel of Christ. Our hope as exiles in this world is the same. Our hope is in the gospel which frees us from our past, empowers us for today, and gives us hope for the future.

10 Reasons I Recommend The Gospel Transformation Bible

(1) It will help you see the types, promises, and promises of God in the Old Testament that are ultimately fulfilled in Jesus Christ.

(2) It will give you guiding principles for studying how each passage, book, and period of the Bible unfolds the theme of redemption from Genesis to Revelation.

(3) It will impact your affections for Christ and the gospel. You will be touched by the majestic and intimate grace of God for you.

(4) It will motivate you to share the gospel with others. It will re-ignite an excitement in you for the gospel that will overflow out of your heart to your mouth with those who don't know about Jesus.

(5) It will help you to see that all of the Scriptures are about Jesus. You will learn how to see Jesus through the "Jesus lens" as you read the Old and New Testament's.

(7) It will help you become less legalistic or irreligious. It will help you to understand God's grace in such a way that you become a more gracious and balanced individual.

(8) It will help you see the big picture of the Bible. It's kind of like putting a bunch of pieces together of a large puzzle without the picture. When you read through all the notes in this Bible you will see a beautiful tapestry of Christ - and that He was there all along. He longs for you to discover and bask in His grace.

(9) It will renew and excitement in you for Bible study - and not just to know more doctrine, but because you will find yourself becoming more like Jesus. It will help to transform your character as you are conforming to the image of Christ.

(10) It will help you to personally know God more intimately. You may fall in love with God for the first time, or may rekindle your love for Him. Because you will find in the notes how the message of the Bible and all of history, and meaning itself finds its culmination in a love relationship with God through Christ Jesus.

*I was provided a copy of the Bible for review by the publisher and was not required to write a positive review.
10 internautes sur 10 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 3 Reasons Why the Gospel Transformation Study Bible is NOT Just Another Study Bible. 1 novembre 2013
Par Able Baker - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle
When it comes to lesson plans, sermon prep or personal study a good study Bible can be invaluable to a busy pastor. Though many study Bibles (SB) fail in many areas some stand out as very helpful tools. A couple of months back I read about the Gospel Transformation Bible (GTB) and I was pretty excited to get my pastoral fingers on it. For several reasons...

1. I enjoy the ESV translation.
2. Bryan Chapell & Dane Ortlund are the editors.
3. It has a redemptive & Christocentric approach to all of the text.
4. The Contributers (Four women! YES! in bold below)

Old Testament

Genesis: Willem VanGemeren
Exodus: Sean Lucas
Leviticus: Jay Sklar
Numbers: Michael Morales
Deuteronomy: Mark Futato
Joshua: Mike Horton
Judges: Brian Aucker
Ruth: Mary Beth McGreevy; "Speaker and Author"
1-2 Samuel: Phil Long
1-2 Kings: Miles Van Pelt
1-2 Chronicles: Miles Van Pelt
Ezra: Kathleen Nielson; "Director of Women's Initiatives for The Gospel Coalition"
Nehemiah: Kathleen Nielson
Esther: Elyse Fitzpatrick; "Speaker and Author"
Job: Paul Zahl
Psalms: George Robertson/Bruce Ware
Proverbs: Ray Ortlund
Ecclesiastes: Doug O'Donnell
Song of Solomon: Doug O'Donnell
Isaiah: Kelly Kapic
Jeremiah: Graeme Goldsworthy
Lamentations: Graeme Goldsworthy
Ezekiel: Greg Gilbert
Daniel: Bryan Chapell
Hosea: Jim Hamilton
Joel: Tim Witmer
Amos: David Helm
Obadiah: Michael Glodo
Jonah: Colin Smith
Micah: Nancy Guthrie; "*Bible Teacher* (I love it!) and Author"
Nahum: Michael Glodo
Habakkuk: Julius Kim
Zephaniah: Darrin Patrick
Haggai: Iain Duguid
Zechariah: Iain Duguid
Malachi: Iain Duguid

New Testament

Matthew: Frank Thielman
Mark: Hans Bayer
Luke: Jonathan Pennington
John: Scotty Smith
Acts: Justin Holcomb
Romans: Bob Yarbrough
1 Corinthians: Jimmy Agan
2 Corinthians: Stephen Um
Galatians: Ian Smith
Ephesians: Kevin DeYoung
Philippians: Jon Dennis
Colossians: Julius Kim
1-2 Thessalonians: Burk Parsons
1-2 Timothy: Kent Hughes
Titus J. D. Greear
Philemon: Julius Kim
Hebrews: Robert Peterson
James: Dan Doriani
1-2 Peter: Jared Wilson
1-3 John: Mike Bullmore
Jude: Jared Wilson
Revelation: Jim Hamilton

When I first found out about the GTB I could not wait for a copy for the above mentioned reasons. I sent an email to Crossway requesting a copy for review and they were kind enough to send me one. So I want to thank them for that! I believe it's a SB that every busy pastor should own as a solid, concise reference tool for study and sermon prep. Here are the three reasons I think the GTB is somewhat unique and NOT just another SB.

1. Aim.
Right in the introduction it says this "The goal of the Gospel Transformation Bible is twofold: (1) to enable readers to understand that the whole Bible is a unified message of the gospel of God's grace culminating in Christ Jesus, and (2) to help believers apply this good news to their everyday lives in a heart-transforming way."

Finding the Creation - Fall - Redemption - Consummation narrative of a Biblical Theology is not always the easiest thing to do and it helps to have a commentary on the text to act as a kind of catalyst for a busy pastor like me. The GTSB is helpful for my desire to read the text through a redemptive-historical lens.

Here is an example from the notes on Exodus 20:1-2: "Notice that the gracious relationship that God had established with his people was prior to the holy requirements that God gave. God identified himself in royal and personal terms--"I am the Lord your God." He speaks of what he has done in redemption--"who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery." He speaks of whom his people belonged to in the past (slaves to Pharaoh) and speaks of whose they are now (by implication, belonging to God). God's grace, then, grounds his law. Yet it is also true that his law leads us back to God and his grace. Shortly after Israel hears these words from God's own voice, they fall into idolatry and sensuality, violating nearly the entire moral law (32:1-6). Israel's failure represents the need we all have for gracious forgiveness (pictured in Israel through the sacrificial system) and also for God to write his law on our hearts (Jer. 31:31-34). This is what God through Christ by his Spirit does in the new covenant--Christ's sacrificial death secures God's gracious forgiveness once-for-all, and Christ's Spirit accomplishes in the hearts of God's people all that Jeremiah had prophesied (Heb. 7:11-9:28). Christians have God's law written on our hearts and God's Spirit dwelling within us, offering a greater possibility of obedience grounded in our gracious relationship with God established through Jesus. And so it is that grace grounds law, and law leads us back to grace."

2. Accessibility.
Everything this bible has to offer is online. Being able to access a purchased book in digital format is a must for a busy pastor. When you buy the bible it comes with an unlock code that you can use to access the GTSB online here... [...].

3. Introductions.
I absolutely love the concise book introductions that a good study bible can offer. The GTSB offers some wonderful unique redemptive historical centered introductions.

Here are some samples from the Psalms intro...

"The Gospel in the Psalms: The risen Jesus said to his disciples that "everything written about me in the Law of Moses and the Prophets and the Psalms [i.e., the Old Testament Poetical Books] must be fulfilled" (Luke 24:44). Jesus considered the book of Psalms to be ultimately about him. To read the Psalms in a non-gospel way, therefore, is to fail to read them the way Jesus himself told us to."

"Reading the Psalms mindful of Jesus is not a clever way to read this book of the Bible, nor is it one way to do so among others. It is the way. A gospel-lens to reading the Psalms is how Jesus himself teaches us to read them. As you read this portion of God's Word, make these prayers to God your own, and consider the ways these Psalms are good news to us--expressing the full range of our emotions, and ultimately bringing our minds to rest on the finished work of Christ on behalf of sinners."

So if you are interested in a SB that highlights the melodic line of the Creation - Fall - Redemption - Consummation themes in Scripture this is a must have resource. I think that Crossway has delivered a wonderful resource for those interested in solid pastoral, evangelical and biblical exegesis. Though I would have liked to see some female theologians and a female presence in the N.T. this SB delivers exactly what I was hoping for. If you already have the ESV Study Bible you will find the GTB to be a wonderful compliment. So go out and get one and tell me what you think!

My Rating: I enjoy books that are (1) theologically astute (AMEN!), (2) pastorally useful (Amen!) as well as (3) referenceable (Amen!). I want to be able to come back to it again and again. As a small church solo pastor I have no use for books that will waste my time and my money. When I request a book from a publisher to review I have the busy small church pastor in mind. The Gospel Transformation Bible is worthy of my three fold amen! It is theologically astute, pastorally useful and referenceable.

Pastor Able Baker ThinkTheology.org
7 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Great tool for personal study 31 octobre 2013
Par James R. V. Matichuk - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle
The Gospel Transformation Bible is not a Study Bible, at least in the traditional sense. A team of scholars and pastors have joined together under Bryan Chappell's and Dane Ortlund's editorial direction to answer two questions: (1) How is the gospel evident in all of scripture? and (2) How does the gospel of grace bring about our transformation? Each of the books of the Bible have a brief introduction which describes authorship and date and how the gospel is illuminated (how it fits into the larger story of salvation). The notes on the bottom of each page, continue this dual focus on God's larger plan of redemption and implications for our life. Sometimes the notes are as detailed (particular books have more expansive and detailed notes). Some passages are passed over without comment (i.e. certain narratives in the Old Testament historical books do not carry much comments). The reason for this is that the notes are focused and so do not attempt to untangle every difficulty in the text (like a Study Bible would).

What is the gospel that contributors describe? It is focused on Jesus' life, death and resurrection as God's plan of redpemption for humanity. But Jesus did not come in a vacuum. The Bible tells the story of God's relationship to his people and the First Testament anticipates Christ's coming. Thus the contributors to this volume, read the Bible Christologically (yet sensitively).

Some great scholars and interpreters have contributed to this Bible. Among them are Michael Horton (Joshua), V. Philips Long (1-2 Samuel), Bruce Ware (Psalms), Graeme Goldsworthy (Jeremiah, Lamentations), Bryan Chapell (Daniel), Frank Thielman (Matthew), R. Kent Huges (1-2 Timothy) and more. Because some of the scholars are more scholarly and others more pastoral, there is a lack of consistency from book to book. Each of these individual interpreters give their particular spin on the gospel implications of a passage or book, though they share a broad agreement on the gospel.

Scot Mcknight argued in The King Jesus Gospel (Zondervan 2011) that certain evangelicals have reduced the gospel to the message of personal salvation, rather than describing how Jesus fulfills the hopes of Israel. In general I would say that most of the interpreters in this volume are not guilty of McKnight's charge. They have attended to the wider biblical story and not just the `order of salvation.' However there are occasional lapses. For example, Daniel Doriani's notes on James reduce the book's gospel value to illustrating our inability to enact `true religion,' driving us back to the grace of Christ. I would say that James carries social implications (care of widows and orphans) which make the gospel manifest. The gospel in James should not be reduced to the level of personal sin (only). But this is one example. At other points, I think the notes are brilliant and illuminating.

Another feature I appreciate about this Bible, is the use it makes of the ESV cross-reference system. Following these cross references sheds light on particular themes and I find that helpful. Purchasing the Bible in print gives you access to the Bible online (it is easier to access cross-references if you don't have to flip through pages for every verse). This makes this a very practical choice for personal study.

In general I am pretty happy with the quality of this Bible. The notes are not always perfect (some interpreters are more perfect than others), but the inspiration of the Bible does not extend to marginal notes. I appreciate how well executed the final product is. And I absolutely loved finding Phil Long's contribution (on Samuel). Long was my professor for two classes of Exegesis at Regent College (neither of which focused on Samuel, but because it is an area of some expertise I heard plenty of Samuel examples). From Phil I learned to read Old Testament narrative sensitive to its narrative craft, its historical value and theological import. I like having some of his practical insights in print form.

I give this Bible 4 stars and would recommend it for personal study. I am not a huge fan of `study Bibles,' but the unique features and perspectives of this Bible make it a valuable contribution.

Thank you to Crossway for providing me a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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