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Hans Andersen's Fairy Tales: Retold by Naomi Lewis [Anglais] [Broché]

Hans Andersen , Jan Pienkowski , Naomi Lewis


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Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

A delightful selection of stories from Hans Christian Andersen, translated by the eminent writer and critic, Naomi Lewis. All the best-known and most-loved stories are included - 'Thumbelina', 'The Snow Queen', 'The Emperor's New Clothes' etc, as well as the less familiar - 'The Goblin at the Grocer's' and 'Dance, Dolly, Dance'.

Biographie de l'auteur

Hans Christian Andersen (1805–75) was born in Odense, Denmark, the son of a poor shoemaker and a washerwoman. As a young teenager, he became quite well known in Odense as a reciter of drama, and as a singer. When he was fourteen, he set off for the capital, Copenhagen, determined to become a national success on the stage. He failed miserably, but made some influential friends in the capital, who got him into school to remedy his lack of proper education. He hated school: aged seventeen, he was in a class of twelve-year-olds and was constantly mocked by them and by the teachers. In 1829 his first book – an account of a walking trip – was published. After that, books came out at regular intervals. At first, he considered his adult books more important than his fantasies. In later life, however, he began to see that these apparently trivial stories could vividly portray constant features of human life and character, in a charming manner. There were two consequences of this. First, he stopped regarding his stories as trifles written solely for children; second, he began to write more original stories, rather than retelling traditional tales. He once said that ideas for stories ‘lie in my mind like seeds and only need the kiss of a sunbeam or a drop of malice to flower’. He would often thinly disguise people he liked or disliked as characters in his stories: a woman who failed to return his love becomes the foolish prince in ‘The Little Mermaid’; his own ugliness and humiliation, or his father’s daydream of being descended from a rich and powerful family, are reflected in ‘The Ugly Duckling’. Hans Andersen’s stories began to be translated into English as early as 1846. Since then, numerous editions, and more recently Hollywood songs and a Disney cartoon, have helped to ensure the continuing popularity of the stories in the English-speaking world.

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There was once a prince who wished to marry a princess - but a real princess she had to be. Lire la première page
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Couverture | Copyright | Table des matières | Extrait | Quatrième de couverture
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Amazon.com: 4.3 étoiles sur 5  100 commentaires
140 internautes sur 146 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Best of its Kind 12 mai 2010
Par Mithril - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
I have been slowly (so veeeerrry slooooowlllly) working my way through all the Hans Christian Andersen books available for kindle. This is the only one I would suggest reading.

Not only does this version have an active table of contents and lack any of the distracting misplacement of page numbers and illustration names that several of the others have (although it's still not illustrated), but it contains what appears to be every story ever written by Hans Christian Andersen!

Long stories (The Ice Maiden), short stories (The Princess and the Pea), well-known stories (The Little Mermaid), unknown stories (She was Good for Nothing) and dozens of others are all contained within these e-ink pages!

They are also readable! This is not the case with some of the other HCA books on kindle. The stories are still really boring, occasionally tedious, generally depressing and often religious, but yet I can read them without wanting to scream and pull my hair out as I did with What the Moon Saw: and Other Tales. Instead they are somehow magically more approachable and I can almost remember why I loved Hans Christian Andersen so much as a child (selected stories from, at least).

So if you, like me, are determined to try and re-visit your childhood via fairy tales written by Hans Christian Andersen no matter what, at least take pity on yourself--or pity on your children if you're trying to read the stories to them--and read this version.
128 internautes sur 139 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 The true story of "The Little Mermaid" will surprise you! 15 juillet 2000
Par Rebecca of Amazon - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
If you remember Thumbelina, The Nightingale, The Ugly Duckling or The Princess and the Pea, they are all here in a wonderful collection of stories written by Hans Christian Anderson. Unlike the Brothers Grimm, who collected and recorded popular tales, Hans Christian Anderson wrote his own "folk" tales, which also contain Danish history and foreign literature.

Not all of his stories end well, yet this is a side of life children should learn about so they can be aware of it later in life. Your child might be horrified to learn that not everything ends up quite as magical as it would in a Disney movie. My favorite tale has always been "The Little Mermaid." She wanted to be something she was not meant to be and for me that is a lesson of how we should be who we really are. She actually ends up not marrying the prince. I quote:

The little mermaid lifted up glorified eyes towards the sun, and felt them, for the first time, filling with tears. On the ship, in which she had left the prince......she saw him and his beautiful bride searching for her; sorrowfully they gazed at the pearly foam, as if they knew she had thrown herself into the waves.

Some of the stories are very moralistic, yet he retains a mischievous sense of humor in some stories. His stories always reflect his fertile imagination. This particular collection was translated by Mrs. H. B. Paull, H. Oskar Sommer, Jean Hersholt and several other unknown translators. Six distinguished artists helped to illustrate this book. These are black and white illustrations and there are not really very many of them. To me a fully illustrated book should be fully illustrated. Nonetheless, this is not a book just for children. In fact, I see this more as a book which should be read to children by their parents. In this way parents and children can discuss items of interest. This book on its own would most likely not appeal to a child, due to the lack of pictures. It is meant to be read to them as far as I can tell. I also would recommend it to adults who remembered these stories as I did and want to read them again.

Perhaps I also remember the story about the tinder box very well. It is a magical story of a soldier who goes into a hollow tree and finds a passage with doors which lead to chambers. It sounds frightening at first but has a lovely happy ending.

Books can take us to another world and this one will take a child to many places they will never forget. And so the first story begins: "Far down in the forest, where the warm sun and the fresh air made a sweet resting place, grew a pretty little fir-tree; and yet it was not happy, it wished so much to be tall like its companions¯the pines and firs which grew around it. The sun shone, and the soft air fluttered its leaves, and..."

~The Rebecca Review
148 internautes sur 162 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
2.0 étoiles sur 5 Expected Better Quality 8 janvier 2000
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
Andersen and Grimm are supposed to be classics. While I like having the collection and while the illustrations are very nice - the pages themselves are much closer to newspaper-stock than what I'd expect from a durable, long-lasting book. Very thin, gritty, and easily tearable. It was kind of disappointing. This also applies to the Grimm book from the same editor.
37 internautes sur 37 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 A wonderful book for adults and children 14 mars 2004
Par Guinevere Cuthbert - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
I have always been a fan of the original versions of fairy tales, so I picked this book up a few years ago, just to read for myself. A few weeks ago my six year old found it hidden among my millions of other books, and asked me to read it to her. While easy to read silently, it is a bit hard to get into the rythm of the wording at first, but after stumbling through a few paragraphs, it becomes much easier to handle.
Since the discovery of this book, my children have been requesting stories from it almost every night. At first my three year old complained about the lack of pictures (it really isn't "fully illustrated"), but she quickly got over that and enjoys listening to every story. Both of my older children like to compare these stories to ones they've seen on TV, or read in the few modernized fairy tale books we own (given to us by friends and relatives). Maybe my children are warped - which is very likely - but they prefer the original stories, with their not-so-happy, and often times violent, endings.
I've never been one to believe children need to have their reality padded... real life doesn't always end the way we hoped, so neither should stories. Hopefully this book, and ones like it, will be a bedtime favorite for years to come.
31 internautes sur 31 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Beautifully embroidered, melancholy tales 9 avril 1998
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
Hans Christian Andersen, the famous Danish author, wrote 168 fairy tales and 159 of them are included in this mega-book of his works. They are beautifully embroidered, vastly imaginative stories, with a sweet air of melancholy. They are particularly wonderful to read aloud with lots of lively dialogue that invites the use of funny voices, for those like me given to that sort of parental self-humiliation; talking Christmas trees, grouchy toads, haughty queens and toys with an attitude.
It is ironic that Andersen did not consider his fairy tales very important. He wanted to be a "serious" writer and worked much harder on his real projects; plays, novels, poetry, travel books and autobiographies. Those works are largely forgotten while his fairy tales not only live on, but have permeated our culture. Our thinking and even our speech are peppered with references to his stories. The Ugly Duckling, Thumbelina, The Little Mermaid and The Red Shoes come to mind.

Do be forewarned that not all of the stories have happy endings and some are really terribly sad. Andersen did not have an easy life. His father died when he was eleven and his existence was rather joyless for a long time after that. He left home at fourteen and wandered about trying different lines of work unsuccessfully until finally, after years of struggle and hardship, he was noticed by important people and gained acceptance. Perhaps the darker images in his writings spring from his own difficult years.

Oddly enough, my own children are especially intrigued by the sadder tales. In our time, we shelter children so from any tinge of melancholy. Their interest and the fact that enormous crowds are flocking to see Titanic, an undeniably tragic story, has caused me to wonder if there is a need in the human psyche to tiptoe a bit around the edges of pathos. Hans Christian Andersen's stories are like small beautifully wrapped gifts, but he leaves a few sad little loose ends so they don't always tie up into perfect !packages.
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