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History of Italian Renaissance (Trade Version) [Anglais] [Relié]

Frederick Hartt , David G. Wilkins


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Relié EUR 59,90  
Relié, 1 février 1994 --  
Broché EUR 106,59  
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History of Italian Renaissance Art (Trade) History of Italian Renaissance Art (Trade)
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Description de l'ouvrage

1 février 1994

For survey courses in Italian Renaissance art.

 

A broad survey of art and architecture in Italy between c. 1250 and 1600, this book approaches the works from the point of view of the artist as individual creator and as an expression of the city within which the artist was working.

 

History of Italian Renaissance Art, Seventh Edition, brings you an updated understanding of this pivotal period as it incorporates new research and current art historical thinking, while also maintaining the integrity of the story that Frederick Hartt first told so enthusiastically many years ago. Choosing to retain Frederick Hartt's traditional framework, David Wilkins' incisive revisions keep the book fresh and up-to-date.

--Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Broché .

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Quatrième de couverture

Frederick Hartt's History of Italian Renaissance Art remains an unrivaled classic. As absorbing to read as it is authoritative in content, the book covers over four centuries of Italian painting, sculpture, and architecture. Its sumptuous color illustrations, fine writing, and in-depth scholarship bring into focus all the elements of this extraordinarily creative period and the amazing personalities who gave it life. Building on the book's more than thirty-year tradition, revising author David G. Wilkins skillfully blends new scholarly discoveries with Hartt's original emphasis on stylistic developments between the twelfth and sixteenth centuries. Wilkins's approach retains the enthusiasm and appreciation that Hartt so successfully conveyed to generations of students and admirers of Italian Renaissance art.

The fifth edition has a striking new design with more than half the works of art now illustrated in color. A lavish color portfolio of the Italian Renaissance opens the book and launches the reader on a dazzling adventure across time. New views of frescoes and sculptures photographed in their original locations offer a dynamic insight into the way Renaissance men and women experienced their art. Since the release of the fourth edition, many more works have been restored, including Michelangelo's Last Judgment in the Sistine Chapel and Raphael's Stanze frescoes in the Vatican. Fresh views of renowned works are included with art commissioned or produced by women. Extended captions identify Renaissance patrons and provide details about historical context, emphasizing how art was created and why, while in-depth visual analysis clarifies the aesthetic developments that emerged in key artistic centers such as Florence, Rome, Venice, and Siena. New iconographic diagrams and computerized reconstructions add dimension to the meanings behind classical, secular, and sacred motifs. Architectural plans, maps in color, and an expanded glossary and bibliography complete this well-rounded picture of the Italian Renaissance.

Frederick Hartt and David Wilkins's History of Italian Renaissance Art invites us to experience a rich artistic legacy in painting, sculpture, and architecture. Through an engaging narrative complemented by a cascade of illustrations, Hartt and Wilkins connect us with the remarkable artists whose innovations and visions shaped the Renaissance.

--Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Relié .

Biographie de l'auteur

The late Frederick Hartt was one of the most distinguished art historians of the twentieth century. A student of Berenson, Schapiro, and Friedlaender, he taught for more than fifty years, influencing generations of Renaissance scholars. At the time of his death he was Paul Goodloe McIntire Professor Emeritus of the History of Art at the University of Virginia. He was a Knight of the Crown of Italy, a Knight Officer of the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic, an honorary citizen of Florence, and an honorary member of the Academy of the Arts of Design, Florence, a society whose charter members included Michelangelo and the Grand Duke Cosimo I de' Medici.

 

Hartt authored, among other works, Florentine Art under Fire (1949); Botticelli (1952); Giulio Romano (1958); Love in Baroque Art (1964); The Chapel of the Cardinal of Portugal (1964); three volumes on the painting, sculpture, and drawings of Michelangelo (1964, 1969, 1971); Donatello, Prophet of Modern Vision (1974); Michelangelo's Three Pietàs (1975); and the monumental Art: A History o f Painting, Sculpture, Architecture, now in its fourth edition (1993).

 

David G . Wilkins is professor emeritus of the history of art and architecture at the University of Pittsburgh and former chair of the department. He has also served on the faculties of the University of Michigan in Florence and the Semester at Sea Program. He is author of Donatello (1984, with Bonnie A. Bennett); Maso di Banco: A Florentine Artist of the Early Trecento (1985); The Illustrated Bartsch: "Pre-Rembrandt Etchers," vol. 53 (1985, with Kahren Arbitman); A History o f the Duquesne Club (1989, with Mark Brown and Lu Donnelly); Art Past/Art Present, a broad survey of the history of art (fifth edition, 2005, with Bernard Schultz and Katheryn M. Linduff); and The Art of the Duquesne Club (2001). He was the revising author for the fourth and fifth editions of History of Italian Renaissance Art: Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture (1994, 2003) and co-editor of The Search for a Patron in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance (1996, with Rebecca L. Wilkins) and Beyond Isabella: Secular Women Patrons of Art in Renaissance Italy (2001 with Sheryl E. Reiss). He was editor of The Collins Big Book of Art (2005).  In 2005 he also received the College Art Association’s national award for Distinguished Teaching in Art History.

 

--Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Broché .

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Amazon.com: 4.8 étoiles sur 5  30 commentaires
49 internautes sur 50 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Simply One Of The Best Books Ever! 21 octobre 2007
Par David A. Plouffe - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
I don't give 5-star ratings very often. I reserve them for only the best, and this is indeed the best book on the Italian Renaissance. I received both my BA and MA in Art History and this was the text used for my Renaissance classes. The book does not read as a textbook for those looking for leisure reading. It reads like a novel and is written in easy to understand language. Chapters are broken down by time period. There are a TON of pictures! I would say 50% of the book is pictures and 95% of those are in color. There are a few B&W pictures but they are of rather obscure sculptures or paintings.

The book was originally written by Frederick Harrt who was one of the 'Monument Men' in World War II who went around Italy documenting art, missing, damaged, or otherwise. He has passed away, but David Wilkins has kept up on the new editions with the current scholarship being done in Renaissance Art. Whether you get this as a textbook for a class, or leisure reading, a coffee table book perhaps, or even a Christmas book for a hard-to-buy-for relative, it is well worth the money.
14 internautes sur 14 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 135 of 981 illustrations in color in 4th ed, 50% in 5th, & all needed in 6th 19 janvier 2010
Par Eugene Tenenbaum - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié|Achat authentifié par Amazon
Everything that should be in color is only in the 6th edition with 736 pages. Approx. 50% of the illustrations in the 5th edition (768 pp.) is in black and white including a few important paintings that disappoints a bit. It makes sense to accurately illustrate the visual arts when presenting or analyzing. But fewer than 14% of all illustrations is in color in the 4th edition (ISBN: 0133933806). Otherwise, it is exquisite including its beautiful printing and binding. All the illustrations occupy approx. a half of the 696 pages, but the text is what counts. Maps of the centers of Rome, Florence and Venice on the inside of the front cover and on the flyleaf show many important landmarks, but architecture appears to be a bit underrepresented.

CONTENTS (4th/5th ed.)
Prefaces and Forewords 6
A PORTFOLIO OF THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE 9/10
PRELUDE (5th)
1. Italy and Italian Art 32 (5th)
PART ONE: THE LATE MIDDLE AGES
1. Italy and Italian Art 27 (4th)
2. Duecento Art in Tuscany and Rome 43/58
3. Florentine Art of the Early Trecento 76/92
4. Sienese Art of the Early Trecento 104/124
5. Later Gothic Art in Tuscany and Northern Italy 133/154
PART TWO: THE QUATTROCENTO
6. The Beginnings of Renaissance Architecture 152/180
7. Gothic and Renaissance in Tuscan Sculpture 167/198
8. Gothic and Renaissance in Florentine Painting 187/222
9. The Heritage of Masaccio and the Second Renaissance Style 213/244
10. The Second Renaissance Style in Architecture and Sculpture 229/264
11. Absolute and Perfect Painting: The Second Renaissance Style 252/292
12. Crisis and Crosscurrents 290/328
13. Science, Poetry, and Prose 317/358
14. The Renaissance in Central Italy 350/398
15. Gothic and Renaissance in Venice and Northern Italy 378/424
PART THREE: THE CINQUECENTO
16. The High Renaissance in Florence 430/476
17. The High Renaissance in Rome 479/524
18. High Renaissance and Mannerism 535/580
19. High and Late Renaissance in Venice and on the Mainland 582/630
20. Michelangelo and the Maniera 631/690
Glossary 662/724
Bibliography 669/732
Index 678/746
Credits 696/766

TABLE OF CONTENTS (7th ed.; for details search for pearsonhighered and then for ISBN: 0205705812)
Preface
Chapter 1 PRELUDE: ITALY AND ITALIAN ART 16
PART ONE: THE LATE MIDDLE AGES
Chapter 2 DUECENTO ART IN TUSCANY AND ROME 40
Chapter 3 FLORENTINE ART OF THE EARLY TRECENTO 72
Chapter 4 SIENESE ART OF THE EARLY TRECENTO 102
Chapter 5 LATER GOTHIC ART IN TUSCANY AND NORTHERN ITALY 136
PART TWO: THE QUATTROCENTO
Chapter 6 THE RENAISSANCE BEGINS: ARCHITECTURE 158
Chapter 7 TRANSITIONS IN TUSCAN SCULPTURE 180
Chapter 8 TRANSITIONS IN FLORENTINE PAINTING 202
Chapter 9 THE HERITAGE OF MASACCIO: FRA ANGELICO AND FRA FILIPPO LIPPI 222
Chapter 10 FLORENTINE ARCHITECTURE AND SCULPTURE, c. 1430--1455 238
Chapter 11 FLORENTINE PAINTING AT MID-CENTURY 262
Chapter 12 ART IN FLORENCE UNDER THE MEDICI I 294
Chapter 13 ART IN FLORENCE UNDER THE MEDICI II 318
Chapter 14 THE RENAISSANCE IN CENTRAL ITALY 358
Chapter 15 GOTHIC AND RENAISSANCE IN VENICE AND NORTHERN ITALY 388
PART THREE: THE CINQUECENTO
Chapter 16 THE ORIGINS OF THE HIGH RENAISSANCE 442
Chapter 17 THE HIGH RENAISSANCE IN ROME 486
Chapter 18 NEW DEVELOPMENTS c. 1520--50 542
Chapter 19 HIGH AND LATE RENAISSANCE IN VENICE AND ON THE MAINLAND 590
Chapter 20 THE LATE SIXTEENTH CENTURY 648
Glossary 692
Bibliography 700
Locating Works of Renaissance Art 715
Index 716
Photo Credits 735
Literary Credits 736
19 internautes sur 21 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Complete Reference for Italian Renaissance Art 18 décembre 2006
Par Linda R. - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
This a beautiful book. It is complete and definitive for reference to Italian Renaissance Art. The photographs are clear and the information is concise. I used this for my graduate Italian art history class. I am keeping this book and will not be selling it back!
34 internautes sur 45 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A perfect book for a library and coffee table. 17 décembre 1997
Par colin.nickerson@ccc-infonet.edu - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
Fredrick Hartt is a man whose love of his subject is only equal to his willingness to expalin it in terms of the layman. He does not limit the purview of the book to merely the depiction of Italian life and piety, but brings in narrative and anecdotes to enliven the tome. He introduces us to the vocabulary of the arts, not consigning them to an inconvenient niche in the appendix, neither condescending incessantly or immersed in jagon. The resplendent illustrations, true eye candy, fill the book, making it a true bargain. Hartt truly deserves the copious awards given to him by the patrons of the arts. My only regret is that the usuerers of my school book store had not charged such a bloated price ($72) for this book.
4 internautes sur 4 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Great for Art History Classes and for Personal Reference Use 27 juin 2010
Par "V" on the beach - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché|Achat authentifié par Amazon
I used this book for an art history course and now much later am rereading sections of it to decide what art works I will see on a trip to Florence and Venice. It covers the origins and periods of the Italian Renaissance up to 1600. The descriptions of art works are lengthy and detailed-needed for a class-and useful for learning another way to look at art when you are not an artist. The course and the book made me see this period of art as more than just a time of Madonna pictures. Works by the great artists of the time are covered as well as lesser known but interesting artists, architects, sculptors and leading figures of that period. It is a great reference book for artist and art lover alike. The guide books mention many of the artists, churches and other buildings covered in this book, but the book has details that can help a traveler decide what to see if time does not allow seeing everything. Remember that it is about Italy only and not other countries that later experienced the Renaissance.
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