How To Win Friends and Influence People et plus d'un million d'autres livres sont disponibles pour le Kindle d'Amazon. En savoir plus


ou
Identifiez-vous pour activer la commande 1-Click.
ou
en essayant gratuitement Amazon Premium pendant 30 jours. Votre inscription aura lieu lors du passage de la commande. En savoir plus.
Amazon Rachète votre article
Recevez un chèque-cadeau de EUR 3,47
Amazon Rachète cet article
Plus de choix
Vous l'avez déjà ? Vendez votre exemplaire ici
Désolé, cet article n'est pas disponible en
Image non disponible pour la
couleur :
Image non disponible

 
Commencez à lire How To Win Friends and Influence People sur votre Kindle en moins d'une minute.

Vous n'avez pas encore de Kindle ? Achetez-le ici ou téléchargez une application de lecture gratuite.

How to Win Friends and Influence People: Special Edition [Edition spéciale] [Anglais] [Relié]

Dale Carnegie
4.7 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (15 commentaires client)
Prix : EUR 23,40 Livraison à EUR 0,01 En savoir plus.
  Tous les prix incluent la TVA
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Il ne reste plus que 15 exemplaire(s) en stock.
Expédié et vendu par Amazon. Emballage cadeau disponible.
Voulez-vous le faire livrer le samedi 20 septembre ? Choisissez la livraison en 1 jour ouvré sur votre bon de commande. En savoir plus.
Vendez cet article - Prix de rachat jusqu'à EUR 3,47
Vendez How to Win Friends and Influence People: Special Edition contre un chèque-cadeau d'une valeur pouvant aller jusqu'à EUR 3,47, que vous pourrez ensuite utiliser sur tout le site Amazon.fr. Les valeurs de rachat peuvent varier (voir les critères d'éligibilité des produits). En savoir plus sur notre programme de reprise Amazon Rachète.

Offres spéciales et liens associés


Produits fréquemment achetés ensemble

How to Win Friends and Influence People: Special Edition + The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
Acheter les articles sélectionnés ensemble


Descriptions du produit

Extrait

Chapter 1

"If You Want to Gather Honey, Don't Kick Over the Beehive"

On May 7, 1931, the most sensational manhunt New York City had ever known had come to its climax. After weeks of search, "Two Gun" Crowley -- the killer, the gunman who didn't smoke or drink -- was at bay, trapped in his sweetheart's apartment on West End Avenue.

One hundred and fifty policemen and detectives laid siege to his top-floor hideaway. They chopped holes in the roof; they tried to smoke out Crowley, the "cop killer," with tear gas. Then they mounted their machine guns on surrounding buildings, and for more than an hour one of New York's fine residential areas reverberated with the crack of pistol fire and the rat-tat-tat of machine guns. Crowley, crouching behind an overstuffed chair, fired incessantly at the police. Ten thousand excited people watched the battle. Nothing like it had ever been seen before on the sidewalks of New York.

When Crowley was captured, Police Commissioner E. P. Mulrooney declared that the two-gun desperado was one of the most dangerous criminals ever encountered in the history of New York. "He will kill," said the Commissioner, "at the drop of a feather."

But how did "Two Gun" Crowley regard himself? We know, because while the police were firing into his apartment, he wrote a letter addressed "To whom it may concern." And, as he wrote, the blood flowing from his wounds left a crimson trail on the paper. In his letter Crowley said: "Under my coat is a weary heart, but a kind one -- one that would do nobody any harm."

A short time before this, Crowley had been having a necking party with his girl friend on a country road out on Long Island. Suddenly a policeman walked up to the car and said: "Let me see your license."

Without saying a word, Crowley drew his gun and cut the policeman down with a shower of lead. As the dying officer fell, Crowley leaped out of the car, grabbed the officer's revolver, and fired another bullet into the prostrate body. And that was the killer who said: "Under my coat is a weary heart, but a kind one -- one that would do nobody any harm."

Crowley was sentenced to the electric chair. When he arrived at the death house in Sing Sing, did he say, "This is what I get for killing people"? No, he said: "This is what I get for defending myself."

The point of the story is this: "Two Gun" Crowley didn't blame himself for anything.

Is that an unusual attitude among criminals? If you think so, listen to this:

"I have spent the best years of my life giving people the lighter pleasures, helping them have a good time, and all I get is abuse, the existence of a hunted man."

That's Al Capone speaking. Yes, America's most notorious Public Enemy -- the most sinister gang leader who ever shot up Chicago. Capone didn't condemn himself. He actually regarded himself as a public benefactor -- an unappreciated and misunderstood public benefactor.

And so did Dutch Schultz before he crumpled up under gangster bullets in Newark. Dutch Schultz, one of New York's most notorious rats, said in a newspaper interview that he was a public benefactor. And he believed it.

I have had some interesting correspondence with Lewis Lawes, who was warden of New York's infamous Sing Sing prison for many years, on this subject, and he declared that "few of the criminals in Sing Sing regard themselves as bad men. They are just as human as you and I. So they rationalize, they explain. They can tell you why they had to crack a safe or be quick on the trigger finger. Most of them attempt by a form of reasoning, fallacious or logical, to justify their antisocial acts even to themselves, consequently stoutly maintaining that they should never have been imprisoned at all."

If Al Capone, "Two Gun" Crowley, Dutch Schultz, and the desperate men and women behind prison walls don't blame themselves for anything -- what about the people with whom you and I come in contact?

John Wanamaker, founder of the stores that bear his name, once confessed: "I learned thirty years ago that it is foolish to scold. I have enough trouble overcoming my own limitations without fretting over the fact that God has not seen fit to distribute evenly the gift of intelligence."

Wanamaker learned this lesson early, but I personally had to blunder through this old world for a third of a century before it even began to dawn upon me that ninety-nine times out of a hundred, people don't criticize themselves for anything, no matter how wrong it may be.

Criticism is futile because it puts a person on the defensive and usually makes him strive to justify himself. Criticism is dangerous, because it wounds a person's precious pride, hurts his sense of importance, and arouses resentment.

B. F. Skinner, the world-famous psychologist, proved through his experiments that an animal rewarded for good behavior will learn much more rapidly and retain what it learns far more effectively than an animal punished for bad behavior. Later studies have shown that the same applies to humans. By criticizing, we do not make lasting changes and often incur resentment.

Hans Selye, another great psychologist, said, "As much as we thirst for approval, we dread condemnation."

The resentment that criticism engenders can demoralize employees, family members and friends, and still not correct the situation that has been condemned.

George B. Johnston of Enid, Oklahoma, is the safety coordinator for an engineering company. One of his responsibilities is to see that employees wear their hard hats whenever they are on the job in the field. He reported that whenever he came across workers who were not wearing hard hats, he would tell them with a lot of authority of the regulation and that they must comply. As a result he would get sullen acceptance, and often after he left, the workers would remove the hats.

He decided to try a different approach. The next time he found some of the workers not wearing their hard hat, he asked if the hats were uncomfortable or did not fit properly. Then he reminded the men in a pleasant tone of voice that the hat was designed to protect them from injury and suggested that it always be worn on the job. The result was increased compliance with the regulation with no resentment or emotional upset.

You will find examples of the futility of criticism bristling on a thousand pages of history. Take, for example, the famous quarrel between Theodore Roosevelt and President Taft -- a quarrel that split the Republican party, put Woodrow Wilson in the White House, and wrote bold, luminous lines across the First World War and altered the flow of history. Let's review the facts quickly. When Theodore Roosevelt stepped out of the White House in 1908, he supported Taft, who was elected President. Then Theodore Roosevelt went off to Africa to shoot lions. When he returned, he exploded. He denounced Taft for his conservatism, tried to secure the nomination for a third term himself, formed the Bull Moose party, and all but demolished the G.O.P. In the election that followed, William Howard Taft and the Republican party carried only two states -- Vermont and Utah. The most disastrous defeat the party had ever known.

Theodore Roosevelt blamed Taft, but did President Taft blame himself? Of course not. With tears in his eyes, Taft said: "I don't see how I could have done any differently from what I have."

Who was to blame? Roosevelt or Taft? Frankly, I don't know, and I don't care. The point I am trying to make is that all of Theodore Roosevelt's criticism didn't persuade Taft that he was wrong. It merely made Taft strive to justify himself and to reiterate with tears in his eyes: "I don't see how I could have done any differently from what I have."

Or, take the Teapot Dome oil scandal. It kept the newspapers ringing with indignation in the early 1920s. It rocked the nation! Within the memory of living men, nothing like it had ever happened before in American public life. Here are the bare facts of the scandal: Albert B. Fall, secretary of the interior in Harding's cabinet, was entrusted with the leasing of government oil reserves at Elk Hill and Teapot Dome -- oil reserves that had been set aside for the future use of the Navy. Did Secretary Fall permit competitive bidding? No sir, He handed the fat, juicy contract outright to his friend Edward L. Doheny. And what did Doheny do? He gave Secretary Fall what he was pleased to call a "loan" of one hundred thousand dollars. Then, in a high-handed manner, Secretary Fall ordered United States Marines into the district to drive off competitors whose adjacent wells were sapping oil out of the Elk Hill reserves. These competitors, driven off their ground at the ends of guns and bayonets, rushed into court -- and blew the lid off the Teapot Dome scandal. A stench arose so vile that it ruined the Harding Administration, nauseated an entire nation, threatened to wreck the Republican party, and put Albert B. Fall behind prison bars.

Fall was condemned viciously -- condemned as few men in public life have ever been. Did he repent? Never! Years later Herbert Hoover intimated in a public speech that President Harding's death had been due to mental anxiety and worry because a friend had betrayed him. When Mrs. Fall heard that, she sprang from her chair, she wept, she shook her fists at fate and screamed: "What! Harding betrayed by Fall? No! My husband never betrayed anyone. This whole house full of gold would not tempt my husband to do wrong. He is the one who has been betrayed and led to the slaughter and crucified."

There you are; human nature in action, wrongdoers, blaming everybody but themselves. We are all like that. So when you and I are tempted to criticize someone tomorrow, let's remember Al Capone, "Two Gun" Crowley and Albert Fall. Let's realize that criticisms are like homing pigeons. They always return home. Let's realize that the person we are going to correct and condemn will probably justify himself or herself, and condemn us in return; or, like the gentle ... --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Broché .

Revue de presse

"it changed my life" (Warren Buffet)

"The most successful self-help book of all time... Carnegie has never seemed more relevant" (The Times)

"It's helped me immeasurably in life. I think everyone should read it" (Jenny Colgan, Independent on Sunday)

"a no-nonsense guide to being a better person...an easy-to-read, practical guide" (Spirit and Destiny)

Détails sur le produit

  • Relié: 304 pages
  • Editeur : Vermilion; Édition : Special edition (5 avril 2012)
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 0091947464
  • ISBN-13: 978-0091947460
  • Dimensions du produit: 13,7 x 20,6 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 4.7 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (15 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 79.034 en Livres anglais et étrangers (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres anglais et étrangers)
  • Table des matières complète
  •  Souhaitez-vous compléter ou améliorer les informations sur ce produit ? Ou faire modifier les images?


En savoir plus sur les auteurs

Découvrez des livres, informez-vous sur les écrivains, lisez des blogs d'auteurs et bien plus encore.

Dans ce livre (En savoir plus)
Parcourir les pages échantillon
Couverture | Copyright | Table des matières | Extrait | Quatrième de couverture
Rechercher dans ce livre:

Quels sont les autres articles que les clients achètent après avoir regardé cet article?


Commentaires en ligne 

3 étoiles
0
2 étoiles
0
1 étoiles
0
4.7 étoiles sur 5
4.7 étoiles sur 5
Commentaires client les plus utiles
9 internautes sur 9 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Relations apaisées et harmonieuses 14 juillet 2006
Format:Broché
Voilà un best-seller du management qui est en fait un manuel de communication pragmatique aux visées très générales, sans doute un des pionniers du développement personnel. La durée de vie des ouvrages de management est relativement courte, du fait des transformations des entreprises et de leur adaptation à un univers macro-économique et sociétal changeant. Aussi, la longévité exceptionnelle de celui-ci (soixante-dix ans déjà) peut apparaître comme une gageure de qualité, du moins l'éditeur avance cet argument de vente.
L'objectif affiché est d'aider le lecteur à travailler sur sa relation aux autres et à désamorcer les conflits de la vie quotidienne. L'auteur croît en la motivation par le partage, l'altruisme et la confiance, il bannit les ordres brutaux, les sanctions aveugles, la menace, le management par la peur. Le livre se structure en une trentaine de leçons très pragmatiques, abondamment illustrées d'exemples tirés de l'Histoire ou des expériences de Dale Carnegie et de ses élèves. Carnegie a étudié et expérimenté la psychologie et le comportement humain pendant des années afin de découvrir les facteurs permettant à certains leaders exceptionnels de tirer ceux qui les entourent vers le haut. Après avoir enseigné pendant des années et à des centaines d'étudiants les conclusions de ses recherches, il écrit le présent ouvrage, synthèse de son travail.
Le livre est très accessible, applicable à toutes les situations sociales (professionnelle, familiale, etc.
Lire la suite ›
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
8 internautes sur 8 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Useful and stimulating 21 avril 2007
Par TROLLE
Format:Broché
As a post-graduate, fourteen years ago, I had been advised to read a Dale Carnegie's book by one of my lecturer. Presented as a must-read author, I kept this opportunity in mind and finally read it more than a decade after! Despite a misleading title, 'How to win friends and Influence People' is a trully business oriented book. Made of numerous practical advice to improve one's relationship, I felt interest for easy-to-handle selling techniques. I actually get a lot out of them in my professional life. Carnegie's book is jam-packed with positive attitudes. It shows Americans who express a keen interest in constant improvment of themselves to make the most of their business or of their life. Which is very stimulating.
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
9 internautes sur 10 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Indispensable! 30 août 2003
Par Un client
Format:Poche
Petit, facile et très agréable à lire, ce livre publié en 1936 est devenu LA référence en matière de psycologie pratique.
Les conseils prodigués sont simples et concrets ("Ayez le sourire"), mais loin d'être simpliste, D.C. nous fournit d'une façon très convaincante et motivante les clés de la réussite dans les relations humaines.
Amazon.fr distribue aussi la traduction française de cet ouvrage.
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
Par Arnaud
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
Dale Carnegie is still clearly one of the best author in the field. Notably concerning work relationships and public speaking (not in this book though).

Writing and examples may seem a little dated, but the message is still enlightning. Some old habits (like names, little stories, and the other person advice) are all the more important today when new habits seem to forget them.

The Kindle Edition is very cool.

-----

Dale Carnegie est clairement l'un des meilleurs auteurs contemporains concernant le développement personnel (surtout en ce qui concerne les relations de travail et les discours).

Certes le discours est un peu vieilli et les exemples semblent parfois ancien, mais l'esprit du texte reste éclairant et justement certains anciens usages (l'importance des noms et des anecdotes, ou l'importance de l'avis de l'autre) restent d'autant plus d'actualité que les usages modernes semblent totalement les oublier.

Bonne édition Kindle
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Par argeles2
Format:Poche
L'auteur résume en quelques formules simples et facilement mémorisables les grandes règles de l'art des relations humaines harmonieuses. Même si on connaît beaucoup de ces règles intuitivement, les résumer en quelques formules choc est un aide-mémoire fort utile.
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Excellent self-improvement book! 27 mars 2014
Par Eva Del
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
This book profoundly changes the way you look at the world, and the way you think about everybody.
Just offered it as a gift to my husband too. I started to read it and am very impressed.
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Conforme 7 février 2014
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Livraison conforme en tout point à ce qui avait été annoncé.

Les basiques en communication. Très efficace, argumenté, et dans une démarche scientifique.
Par ailleurs agréable à lire et plein d'humour.
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Essentiel 9 février 2013
Par J. thomas
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Good for business, great for all relationships. Time cannot change these concepts. Will buy more copies to share, especially for my son entering business school.
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
Vous voulez voir plus de commentaires sur cet article ?
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ?   Dites-le-nous

Discussions entre clients

Le forum concernant ce produit
Discussion Réponses Message le plus récent
Pas de discussions pour l'instant

Posez des questions, partagez votre opinion, gagnez en compréhension
Démarrer une nouvelle discussion
Thème:
Première publication:
Aller s'identifier
 

Rechercher parmi les discussions des clients
Rechercher dans toutes les discussions Amazon
   


Rechercher des articles similaires par rubrique


Commentaires

Souhaitez-vous compléter ou améliorer les informations sur ce produit ? Ou faire modifier les images?