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Ignorance: How It Drives Science (Anglais) Relié – 19 juillet 2012

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Descriptions du produit

Revue de presse

This is a lovely little book ... Give it to your friends or relatives to explain why you do science. (Professor Jack Cohen FSB, The Biologist)

[B]oth concise and splendidly aphoristic. (Robin Ince, New Statesman)

A valuable acquisition for academic libraries, given the current emphasis on STEM education and undergraduate research. (R. E. Buntrock, CHOICE)

It is important to emphasize the creative process in the sciences. This is not just another methodological book on the empirical cycle, but an unpretentious and smooth-reading plea for attention on an uncultivated but mineable area. (Tijdschrift voor Psychiatrie, Dec 2012)

An excellent read, [it is] a fine companion text for potential scientists a the beginning of their studies ... You may gradually become more and more ignorant as you read, and you will enjoy the journey. Ignorance in this telling is truly bliss. (Moran Cerf, Science Magazine)

a quietly mind-blowing new book. (Readers Digest)

Stuart Firestein, a teacher and neuroscientist, has written a splendid and admirably short book about the pleasure of finding things out using the scientific method. He smartly outlines how science works in reality rather than in stereotype. Ignorance is a thoughtful introduction to the nature of knowing, and the joy of curiosity. (Adam Rutherford, The Observer)

A splendid book ... Packed with real examples and deep practical knowledge, Ignorance is a thoughtful introduction to the nature of knowing, and the joy of curiosity. (Adam Rutherford, The Observer)

The fundamental attribute of successful scientists, Firestein argues in this pithy book, is a form of ignorance characterised by knowing what you don't know, and being able to ask the right questions. (Culture Lab)

The book is effectively conversational and can be read quickly, as intended. (The American Journal of Epidemiology)

In Ignorance: How It Drives Science Stuart Firestein goes so far as to claim that ignorance is the main force driving scientific pursuit. Firestein, a popular professor of neurobiology at Columbia, admits at the outset that he uses "the word ignorance at least in part to be intentionally provocative" and clarifies that for him it denotes a "communal gap in knowledge." He describes clearly how scientists continually uncover new facts that confront them with the extent of their ignorance, and how they successfully grapple with uncertainty in their daily research work... Especially valuable is Firestein's ability to capture how science gets done in fits and starts... He demystifies the day-to-day activities of research scientists across a variety of disciplines with case studies illustrating how breakthroughs in understanding, however humble or grand, are essentially unforeseeable even to a seasoned mind. (New York Review of Books)

Présentation de l'éditeur

Knowledge is a big subject, says Stuart Firestein, but ignorance is a bigger one. And it is ignorance--not knowledge--that is the true engine of science. Most of us have a false impression of science as a surefire, deliberate, step-by-step method for finding things out and getting things done. In fact, says Firestein, more often than not, science is like looking for a black cat in a dark room, and there may not be a cat in the room. The process is more hit-or-miss than you might imagine, with much stumbling and groping after phantoms. But it is exactly this "not knowing," this puzzling over thorny questions or inexplicable data, that gets researchers into the lab early and keeps them there late, the thing that propels them, the very driving force of science. Firestein shows how scientists use ignorance to program their work, to identify what should be done, what the next steps are, and where they should concentrate their energies. And he includes a catalog of how scientists use ignorance, consciously or unconsciously--a remarkable range of approaches that includes looking for connections to other research, revisiting apparently settled questions, using small questions to get at big ones, and tackling a problem simply out of curiosity. The book concludes with four case histories--in cognitive psychology, theoretical physics, astronomy, and neuroscience--that provide a feel for the nuts and bolts of ignorance, the day-to-day battle that goes on in scientific laboratories and in scientific minds with questions that range from the quotidian to the profound. Turning the conventional idea about science on its head, Ignorance opens a new window on the true nature of research. It is a must-read for anyone curious about science.

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Amazon.com: 66 commentaires
46 internautes sur 49 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Fascinating and not at all "ignorant" 23 mai 2012
Par Wulfstan - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
Stuart Firestein is chair of the biological sciences department at Columbia University- where one of the classes he teaches is indeed "Ignorance".

"In fact more often than not, science is like looking for a black cat in a dark room, and there may not be a cat in the room." says Firestein. Then you need to understand what a scientist does next is to run into another dark room to do it all over again!

And sometimes (like with the experiments on luminiferous aether) , failure can prove as interesting and move science forward as much as a successful experiment.

It's important to understand what by "ignorance" here the author is not talking about willful ignorance, but more about a what has yet to be found out and tested.

The book has several interesting case studies and anecdotes, such as one scientist using a talking parrot to find out what they didn't know about the human brain. Also, the author points out that when a scientist gets a chance to predict the future- he is very often wrong. The author also goes into his rather unorthodox and interesting professional history.

Science is a matter of taking a `educated guess'= (a hypothesis) , which is then tested repeatedly until it becomes a "theory". Many people don't understand that a `scientific theory" isn't a guess, but something that has been proven to be right after repeated rigorous testing. The hypothesis is the guess, not a theory.

I agree with the author in that what's truly exciting is all that's still left to explore and find, things that we may have no idea even exist.

Easy to read, even for the layman.
18 internautes sur 18 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Explains how science really works and is a joyful read 9 juillet 2012
Par J. Schimel - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
For years, I've said in my own classes that "knowledge is a 'waste product' of science"--once the paper is written it goes on the shelf and becomes part of the past. We're on to the next question. This book captures that idea eloquently and engagingly to explain what moves science and motivates scientists. It is beautifully written and develops the points to highlight their implications for society at large.

I loved that the book was short and pithy--Dr. Firestein took the time to write the short letter, and to collapse the arguments and stories down to their essence. He illustrates the fascination of science, its challenge, its compulsion, and its joy in a way no other book I have ever seen comes close.

I've been a scientist for 30 years, and this book says things I've known and understood for most of that career, but says it in a way that is fresh and novel. Even for me, its a rejuvenating reminder of why I went into science. A useful reminder when most of the day can get caught up in meetings and business instead of 'real' science.
25 internautes sur 27 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
A Little Gem of a Book 6 juin 2012
Par Book Fanatic - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
This is a small book in size and length and therefore it doesn't take long to read it. It's a refreshing change to have an author make his point without beating it to death by droning on and on.

It's important to note that the title is a little misleading. Maybe it should have been called "Questions and How They Drive Science". The author is not suggesting we be intentionally uninformed, but that we look to the areas where we don't have explanations and answers for future discoveries.

This is a thinking person's book and the point is that the more we discover the more we find we don't know the answers. Each question answered by science raises more areas of "ignorance"; more unknowns. This is a good book and worth reading. Please take advantage of the "Search Inside" feature of this book on Amazon. Read the available text in chapter one to get an idea about what the book is all about.

14 internautes sur 15 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Approachable, with implications beyond scientific inquiry 5 juin 2012
Par Faisal Nsour - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié Achat vérifié
I appreciate this little book because Stuart Firestein does exactly what he sets out to do. He conveys the experience of dealing with ignorance while working at the edge of what is known. He does so with simple language and with warmth. And he follows his own advice about humility with regard to what one knows by bringing in perspectives from scientists outside his field.

The book is light reading, although thinking about what you aren't thinking about can be slippery at times. Maybe that's why it's so fruitful to spend time on it. The ideas here are useful for anyone living in the modern world. Give more attention to questions than answers.
36 internautes sur 47 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Ignorance is Bliss 22 juillet 2012
Par MoseyOn - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
I saw this short book on a display table at a bookstore and it looked like it would be a nice examination of scientific work for a non-scientist who is nevertheless very interested in science both as a way of organizing and discovering knowledge, and as a core part of a college or university education. And the book is that, in a way, though it is not entirely satisfying. The book stems from a course that Firestein, a neurobiologist, teaches at Columbia University. The idea is appealing and important: The scientist is driven not by what we know, but by what we don't know. It is the gaps in our knowledge, the questions, the unknown beyond the edge of knowledge, that provide the juice for the scientist. If you want to get scientists talking, ask what they don't know, what they're working on, not about the latest data they have produced. And while this is not a great book, and not as deep as I hoped it might be, Firestein's central point is well worth remembering. The book is short, but the truth is that Firestein could have made the point in even fewer words before getting to his case studies. And he could have dropped the little comments out of the side of his mouth that I guess were intended to bring a bit of levity to a serious topic, but which were mostly off topic, sometimes annoying, and easily expendable. But that's a quibble. I was hoping for a careful, nuanced, and probing examination of ignorance and its importance in the quest for knowledge. Perhaps I was looking for something with a bit more epistemological depth. But it's not for me to decide what kind of book Firestein or anyone else should write. I certainly don't regret reading this book. It is worth spending a few hours with as a reminder that there is a lot we don't know--and that the world would be far less interesting if that were not the case.
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