Commencez à lire This Immortal (English Edition) sur votre Kindle dans moins d'une minute. Vous n'avez pas encore de Kindle ? Achetez-le ici Ou commencez à lire dès maintenant avec l'une de nos applications de lecture Kindle gratuites.

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

 
 
 

Essai gratuit

Découvrez gratuitement un extrait de ce titre

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Désolé, cet article n'est pas disponible en
Image non disponible pour la
couleur :
Image non disponible
 

This Immortal (English Edition) [Format Kindle]

Roger Zelazny
5.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (2 commentaires client)

Prix éditeur - format imprimé : EUR 16,94
Prix Kindle : EUR 6,17 TTC & envoi gratuit via réseau sans fil par Amazon Whispernet
Économisez : EUR 10,77 (64%)

App de lecture Kindle gratuite Tout le monde peut lire les livres Kindle, même sans un appareil Kindle, grâce à l'appli Kindle GRATUITE pour les smartphones, les tablettes et les ordinateurs.

Pour obtenir l'appli gratuite, saisissez votre adresse e-mail ou numéro de téléphone mobile.






Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

“Vivid and elliptical... If you've ever asked yourself what would have happened if Philip Marlowe had been Odysseus... here is a clue to the answer.”
—New Worlds

THE HUGO AWARD-WINNING FIRST NOVEL EVER WRITTEN BY THE BESTSELLING AUTHOR OF THE CHRONICLES OF AMBER!

Conrad Nomikos has a long, rich personal history that he'd rather not talk about. And, as Arts Commissioner, he's been given a job he'd rather not do. Escorting an alien grandee on a guided tour of the shattered remains of Earth is not something he relishes-especially when it is apparent that this places him at the center of high-level intrigue that has some bearing on the future of Earth itself!

"Roger Zelazny [was] the compleat New Wave author, so daring he could pen nothing without perturbing some creaky icon... so strong a writer, so moving in the sweep of his plots and imagery."—David Brin

Roger Zelazny was a three-time Nebula Award and six-time Hugo Award-winning author of science fiction and fantasy classics, including the short stories "24 Views of Mount Fuji, by Hokusai," "Permafrost," and "Home is the Hangman." Zelazny was the bestselling author of the ten-volume Chronicles of Amber series of fantasy novels, as well as the novels Lord of Light, and Psychoshop (written with Alfred Bester). Zelazny's novel Damnation Alley served as the basis for the 1972 cult film of the same name, starring Jan Michael Vincent and George Peppard.

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 353 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 180 pages
  • Editeur : IBOOKS (2 juin 2014)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B00KQ8D1JS
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Non activé
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 5.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (2 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°124.228 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
  •  Souhaitez-vous faire modifier les images ?


En savoir plus sur l'auteur

Découvrez des livres, informez-vous sur les écrivains, lisez des blogs d'auteurs et bien plus encore.

Commentaires en ligne

4 étoiles
0
3 étoiles
0
2 étoiles
0
1 étoiles
0
5.0 étoiles sur 5
5.0 étoiles sur 5
Commentaires client les plus utiles
5.0 étoiles sur 5 This Immortal 31 octobre 2011
Par Fremen
Format:Broché
This Immortal a gagné le Hugo Award de Sci Fi en 1966, ex-aequo avec le très célèbre Dune (F.Herbert).
L'anglais est très américain (tranche avec Asimov et Herbert là-dessus), et donne une fraîcheur au livre.
Je n'ai pas fini le livre, alors je peux en parler sans rien dévoiler.
Il semblerait que l'histoire se déroule non pas dans un futur éventuel, mais plutôt dans le futur
tel qu'il aurait été si les mythologies antiques avaient été des événements réels.
Des ET bleus plus avancés que nous s'occupent de nous après une guerre humains contre humains qui a
failli nous détruire. La Terre est ravagée.
Excellent à sa façon, et complètement différent d'Asimov, C.Clarke, ou Herbert. J'insiste sur l'anglais très
moderne de l'auteur.
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
5.0 étoiles sur 5 ... Et pourtant, c'est de Zelazny ! 3 janvier 2013
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
L'ambiance de This Immortal est extrêmement particulière, indéfinissable malheureusement, du moins par moi.

J'ai adoré et j'ai également été surpris de la profondeur du récit que Zelazny présente. J'avais lu son cycle des Princes d'Ambre dont le défaut majeur à mon sens est le manque de profondeur (on favorise l'action au reste, on s'appesantit peu sur le monde, en dehors des actions directes des protagonistes).

This Immortal ne délaisse pas l'action mais est bien plus "équilibré" en ce sens.

Je trouve cet ouvrage plus abouti que les autres de l'auteur et je le recommande.
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.1 étoiles sur 5  59 commentaires
40 internautes sur 42 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Feathers or Lead? 21 février 2005
Par Marc Ruby™ - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
If I were to pick a single science fiction author who was the essence of speculative fiction in the 1960's it would be Roger Zelazny. And while he continued to produce quality work, it was this period when both his quality and his intensity were at a peak that few authors ever reach. This Immortal (AKA Call Me Conrad) is his first novel (closely tied with The Dream Master). It remains a masterpiece four decades after winning a Hugo award and in many ways it defined the themes that haunted Zelazny's writing for years to come.

Zelazny is fascinated with a certain form of divinity - not the kind that 'is and has always been,' but with intelligent creatures that somehow 'graduate' from a more normal, mundane state. In this novel the hero is Conrad Nimikos, a Greek, born on Christmas Eve, one leg shorter than the other, and altogether too much hair. In Greek terms, he was one of the kallikanzaroi, mischievous satyrs who exist to irritate both the human and the divine. Zelazny never tells us how old Nimikos is, but he has lived long enough to have had several names and seen the Earth suffer a nuclear war and start to pick up the pieces.

We were saved by the intervention of the Vegans who helped relocate the remnants of Earth's population throughout space and saw to the survival of those who chose to remain. This was a mixed blessing, since the Vegans seems to want to turn Earth into a resort. Nimikos fought that eventuality (under another name) but has merged into the current social framework as the caretaker of the world's antiquities and treasures. Recently married, he is called from semi-retirement to be the guide for a Vegan journalist who might be writing a book, or looking for better places to put a resort, or something equally nefarious. This will be an ill-starred journey, with many wishing Cort Myshtigo (the Vegan) a quick and unpleasant end, as they travel over a world both barren and beautiful, where danger can take epic proportions.

And that's the trick of this particular book. Nimikos no sooner leaves his beloved Cassandra when we realize that this is an Odyssey we have been invited on, and everywhere we look Greek legends will appear just in time to cause unexpected torments and provide opportunities for Herculean efforts. Even though this is a story told in wry fashion, Zelazny manages to use it to explore the meaning of grief. Sorrow for lost friends, loved ones, and an abiding sense of loss for an Earth that at the time of its writing was only showing faint glimmerings of it's future challenges. This is a poignant book where Zelazny manages an exquisite balance between attitude and affection.

Small wonder that the book has been in print since its writing. Or that a host of other writers will confess to having been influenced by it. The layering of action, myth, and symbol that became a Zelazny hallmark began with this story. And it is hardly an insult to say while many of his books are as good there are none that are clearly better (well, I do have a soft spot for Isle of the Dead).
24 internautes sur 25 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Zelazney's first major work--flawed, but brilliant. 7 mars 2002
Par David J. Gannon - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
This Immortal is a novel set on post-apocalyptic Earth sometime well into the future. The Earth's total population is around 4 million souls-an apt term as a sizable portion of those left are "mutants" of on sort or another. Conrad Nomikos, the protagonist of the novel has a particularly interesting mutation-he's several hundred years old and, insofar as he can tell, an immortal.
The bulk of the population wasn't killed off in the war-they've emigrated to other planets. What few choice locations are left on earth are owned by an alien race-the Vegans-much despised by those left on the planet.
Nomikos "leads" a movement called the Returnist's-folks who want people to move back so that earthlings can reclaim their planet from the Vegans. "Leads" is in quotes as Conrad would rather be sailing and, while he actually sympathizes with Returnist goals in general, he nevertheless has very ambivalent feeling about the Vegans in general.
Pressed into service as a guide for a very influential Vegan touring the planet, Conrad is buffeted by several forces pulling at him in different directions. Not sure what's going on, he set's out to try to keep the Vegan alive while he tries to get at what he's up to. Needless to say, from here on out the stuff is pretty much always hitting the fan, so to speak.
This was Zelazny's first major novel. It is a truly great concept and the overall execution is well done-but it is a first effort. The characterizations are uneven. The story rambles a bit in places, the ending's a bit weak. Nevertheless, the genius that would later dominate the sci-fi world is clearly in evidence here, and my opinion is that to truly appreciate Zelazny's place in sci-fi history, you absolutely need to start here. It wont be his best work you'll read, but it is an essential work. And, on the whole, it's still a classic and a very good story.
46 internautes sur 52 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 The immortal Greek 4 mars 2004
Par E. A. Lovitt - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
Humans have reason to hate themselves even more than they hate the Vegans. The Vegans are basically tourists, lingering among the ruins of the last non-radioactive territories on Earth. The historical Three Days of War occurred between human and human, or rather between dirty bomb and dirty bomb. The back cover of "This Immortal" ironically states "Welcome to Earth (Pop. 60,000)." (Later in the text, we learn that Earth's population is more like four million).
"This Immortal" (1966) was Zelazny's first SF novel, and it shared the Hugo Award for Best Science Fiction Novel of the Year with Frank Herbert's "Dune," so it is no lightweight post-Apocalypse adventure story. In fact, I think the best way to understand "This Immortal" is to read Lawrence Durrell's chronicles of the Greek Isles, most especially "Prospero's Cell" and "Reflections on a Marine Venus"---or better yet, read Percy Shelley's "Prometheus Unbound," which is referred to more than once in this novel.
Like Shelley's Prometheus, Zelazny's hero, Conrad Nimikos is mankind's potential savior. Like Prometheus, he suffers and almost self-destructs in trying to save his chosen people (the humans who remained on Earth). Instead of stealing fire from the gods, he sets out to steal back Earth from the Vegans.

At an earlier stage in his career (nobody knows quite how old he might be), Nimikos was a terrorist. Now he has lost some of his destructive impulse (his hubris), and sets out to protect the Vegan, Cort Myshtigo in order to discover the alien's true purpose in touring Earth's remaining monuments.
The real mystery of "This Immortal" is not so much the Vegans' intentions toward Earth as it is the true identity of Conrad Nomikos. His mistress, Cassandra playfully refers to him as a 'kallikanzaros' (this is where I had to refer to my Durrell), which a Greek term for a little cloven-hooved satyr, who causes mischief of every kind. Conrad is a huge man, superhumanly strong, but he is also incredibly ugly and walks with a limp.
Did he at one time have a cloven hoof?
Like the kallikanzaros, Conrad is a trickster, and deceives Vegans and humans alike into thinking his previous incarnation, the terrorist leader 'Karaghiosis,' has died in a boating accident.

Once more turning to Durrell, we learn that 'Karaghiosis' is a stock character in Greek drama--in fact, "the embodiment of Greek character...based on the idea of the impoverished and downtrodden little man getting the better of the world around him by sheer cunning. Add to this the salt of a self-deprecating humour and you have the immortal Greek."
So Nomikos-Karaghiosis-Prometheus is the embodiment of 'the immortal Greek,' who might or might not be--according to a hint at novel's end, plus references to the kallikanzaros--the Great God, Pan.
Conrad himself refers to "Prometheus Unbound" as "Percy B's dud epic," but then, all of Zelazny's heroes tend to be self-deprecating.
Zelazny has succeeded in capturing the spirit of a people and place in "This Immortal." I think his Hugo was well-deserved.
10 internautes sur 10 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Immortal Tale 14 mars 2002
Par Psychedelic Cowboy - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
I guess I should post a spoiler warning here for those people who haven't read these books yet-though I don't think a Zelazny book can be "spoiled." I recently reread This Immortal. I was really impressed. Especially considering this is Roger's first novel. It is in a first person narrative-which seemed strange since so many of his books are all written in third person. But anyway, the book itself is incredible. I can see why it garnered so many awards. The post-apocalyptic themes are mixed with alien culture, futuristic politics, Greek mythology, derring-do and even a mystery to solve.
It is a great blend of fantasy and science fiction. The main character, Conrad Nimokos, Karagee, etc., etc., etc., is an immortal who may or may not be Pan, Dionysus, or some other figure from mythology (with the shortened leg I kept expecting Hephastus). The supporting characters are all quiet good, and it is interesting given the length of this short novel how much I came to care for these characters and their welfare. Hassan is the noble eastern assassin. Much like Yama in Lord of Light you come to respect and admire him as much as the main character. The two have a long history and are both formidable warriors. Their inevitable duel with slings is a great bit of writing. I love how Hassan insists on calling Conrad, "Karagee." Some characters I was initially suspicious of-the Vegan Myshtigo, and the poet Philip Graver, end up as heroic figures.
I had a huge lump in my throat, and bits of tears in my eyes, as I read Phil's final words to Conrad. Phil is a particularly interesting study. As a man of "half-talent," and more acclaim than skill as a writer, one wonders if Zelazny was doing some soul searching here. There is plenty of that, as Zelazny's pattern of musing over philosophy, religion, politics and art is well established here.
As far as the action goes, there is the above mentioned duel, a battle royale between Conrad and a combat robot, a fight between Hassan and The Deadman-- which is cleverly won, and an escape from tribal half-men. Throw in a voodoo ceremony and you begin to wonder how Roger fit it in to 190 pages. But he did, and it reads like a good symphony plays.
Highly recommended!
6 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Prometheus Unbound with a Vegan twist 29 août 2004
Par E. A. Lovitt - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
Humans have reason to hate themselves even more than they hate the Vegans. The Vegans are basically tourists, lingering among the ruins of the last non-radioactive territories on Earth. The historical Three Days of War occurred between human and human, or rather between dirty bomb and dirty bomb. The back cover of "This Immortal" ironically states "Welcome to Earth (Pop. 60,000)." (Later in the text, we learn that Earth's population is more like four million).

"This Immortal" (1966) was Zelazny's first SF novel, and it shared the Hugo Award for Best Science Fiction Novel of the Year with Frank Herbert's "Dune," so it is no lightweight post-Apocalypse adventure story. In fact, I think the best way to understand "This Immortal" is to read Lawrence Durrell's semi-autobiographical novels on the Greek Isles: most especially "Prospero's Cell" and "Reflections on a Marine Venus"---or better yet, read Percy Shelley's "Prometheus Unbound," which is referred to more than once in this novel.

Like Shelley's Prometheus, Zelazny's hero, Conrad Nimikos is mankind's potential savior. Like Prometheus, he suffers and almost self-destructs in trying to save his chosen people (the humans who remained on Earth). Instead of stealing fire from the gods, he sets out to steal back Earth from the Vegans.

At an earlier stage in his career (nobody knows quite how old he might be), Nimikos was a terrorist. Now he has lost some of his destructive impulse (his hubris), and sets out to protect the Vegan, Cort Myshtigo in order to discover the alien's true purpose in touring Earth's remaining monuments.

The real mystery of "This Immortal" is not so much the Vegan's intentions toward Earth as it is the true identity of Conrad Nomikos. His mistress, Cassandra playfully refers to him as a 'kallikanzaros' (this is where I had to refer to my Durrell), which is a Greek term for a little cloven-hooved satyr, who causes mischief of every kind. Conrad is a huge man, superhumanly strong, but he is also incredibly ugly and walks with a limp.

Did he at one time have a cloven hoof?

Like the kallikanzaros, Conrad is a trickster, and deceives Vegans and humans alike into thinking his previous incarnation, the terrorist leader 'Karaghiosis,' has died in a boating accident.

Once more turning to Durrell, we learn that 'Karaghiosis' is a stock character in Greek drama--in fact, "the embodiment of Greek character...based on the idea of the impoverished and downtrodden little man getting the better of the world around him by sheer cunning. Add to this the salt of a self-deprecating humour and you have the immortal Greek."

So Nomikos-Karaghiosis-Prometheus is the embodiment of 'the immortal Greek,' who might or might not be---according to a hint at novel's end, plus references to the kallikanzaros---the Great God, Pan.

Conrad himself refers to "Prometheus Unbound" as "Percy B's dud epic," but then, all of Zelazny's heroes tend to be self-deprecating.

Zelazny has succeeded in capturing the spirit of a people and place in "This Immortal." I think his Hugo was well-deserved.
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ?   Dites-le-nous
Rechercher des commentaires
Rechercher uniquement parmi les commentaires portant sur ce produit

Discussions entre clients

Le forum concernant ce produit
Discussion Réponses Message le plus récent
Pas de discussions pour l'instant

Posez des questions, partagez votre opinion, gagnez en compréhension
Démarrer une nouvelle discussion
Thème:
Première publication:
Aller s'identifier
 

Rechercher parmi les discussions des clients
Rechercher dans toutes les discussions Amazon
   


Rechercher des articles similaires par rubrique