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In the Heat of the Kitchen (Anglais) Broché – 15 avril 2005


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Broché, 15 avril 2005
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Food intrigued me from an early age. Lire la première page
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Couverture | Copyright | Table des matières | Extrait | Index | Quatrième de couverture
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149 internautes sur 168 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Artfully organized and carefully described recipes. Buy it! 21 mai 2005
Par B. Marold - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
`In the Heat of the Kitchen' by London chef Gordon Ramsay, the host of a Fox TV culinary show, `Hell's Kitchen', which I have not had the pleasure of seeing. Ramsay is the partner and executive chef for three restaurants in and around London and his writing is entirely different than his two countrymen, Jamie Oliver and Nigella Lawson. Both Oliver and Ramsay are professionals down to the tips of their asbestos-conditioned fingers, but where Oliver revels in simple dishes a la River Café and the Mediterranean cuisines, Ramsay is very much a French influenced chef.

Before I get too far afield, I must say I think this is an excellent book on cooking, even if some of the recipes may be just a bit impractical for the casual amateur cook.

To explain, cookbooks can be divided into at least seven different categories and the criteria for judging a book depends on the category into which it falls. There are:

Textbooks such as the CIA's `New Professional Chef' and Jacques Pepin's `Complete Techniques'

Great Collections such as the `Joy of Cooking' and `James Beard's American Cookery'

National or Regional Cuisine Collections such as Julia Child's `Mastering the Art of French Cooking'

Restaurant `haute cuisine' such as Joel Robuchon's `Simply French' and Thomas Keller's books.

Entertaining cookbooks such as Martha Stewart's classic `Entertaining' and Gourmet magazine books

Special Subjects such as Alice Waters' `Chez Panisse Fruits' or Rachael Ray's '30 Minute Meal' books

Moneymaking Cookbooks promoting a person or an organization. Local fundraising cookbooks and non-chef (Patti LaBelle, Al Roker, etc) books fall into this category.

Celebrity Chef / Restaurant cookbooks from people such as Emeril Lagasse, Tyler Florence, Jamie Oliver, Rocco DiSpirito, and dozens of others.

The last category generally provides value by including the virtues of at least one or more of the other major categories added the cachet obtained by being able to say you are cooking a recipe from Babbo or Café Boulud or Lespanisse or Sara Moulton or Ina Garten.

Ramsay's book is certainly a member of this last category with a strong grounding in the `haute cuisine' category. Ramsay makes no pretensions that his dishes are easy to make. His primary influence is clearly French and Spanish, primarily Catalan (Barcelona) techniques plus the rich range of American ingredients. His book is the perfect example of the kind you would want in a library by your best armchair, where you want to read it carefully for ideas in creating your own recipes. The first thing which comes to mind as I read the book is Bob Kinkead's statement that he owns about 1200 cookbooks, but he has never followed the recipe in any of them, step for step. Rather, he reads and `digests' their ideas that become ideas he puts into his own recipes.

The first thing I like about Ramsay's book is that it has chapters based on ingredients. I have seen several books recently with all sorts of whiz-bang chapter titles that mean practically nothing when you pull the book off your shelves and glance at the table of contents. Some of these books are good, but their organization is not to their credit.

Ramsay's chapters are:

Shellfish, with an emphasis on American blue crabs plus oysters, clams, langoustines, and scallops.

Fish, with red mullet, cod salmon, tuna and a few unusual species such as skate and monkfish.

Poultry and Game Birds, where he addresses the perennial question of how to deal with different cooking times for white and dark meat. I recommend you give his solution a try when roasting chicken.

Meat, with a very nice selection of recipes for braised pork, filet mignon, stuffed roast lamb, tomatoes stuffed with chili, veal and foie gras, and a new perspective on sauteeing calves liver.

Pasta and Rice, with an emphasis on risottos, stuffed pastas, and spatzle (German pasta / dumplings)

Vegetables, with several recipes for soups and salads. First time I've seen a fondue of lettuce!

Eggs, one of my very favorite subjects, which Ramsay does to a tee. Perfect omelet and fried egg recipes. Since all recipes are organized by primary ingredient, many of the dessert recipes fall in this egg chapter and the following chapter on fruits.

Fruit with sorbets, sherbets, gelatins, walnut cake, great pain perdu (French toast) with peaches and berry kebabs.

Flour, with breads, pastries, and cakes. I invariably give good scores to general cookbooks that have a good chapter on interesting bread baking. While his nibs Jamie Oliver does the easy Italian stuffed breads, Ramsay goes for things a bit more complicated but more interesting with a great sun-dried tomato fougasse (French for focaccia) plus a very nice recipe for a vanilla flavored pate sucree. Unlike the flaky style of pastry Americans use for pies where the butter must stay cold and the dough must be handled with kid gloves, this dough is less delicate and fussy.

The last chapter on stocks, sauces, and dressings has all the usual stuff, including a very nicely simple recipe for chicken stock. I really respect those who simmer their stock for half a day or overnight, but I personally prefer this simpler three-hour recipe.

Ramsay has a reputation for being very demanding in the kitchen, and his recipes benefit from his eye for detail. Many recipes are easily within the amateur's abilities and while there are a few which need more expensive and rare ingredients, you can trust that Ramsay is giving you some of the very best techniques for dealing with them, as he is for his egg and flour recipes.

This is an excellent book for cookbook readers and people who like to perfect simple dishes and try their hand at dishes that are both classic and just a bit unusual.

Very highly recommended.
36 internautes sur 38 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Exact Replica of 'Secrets' 5 novembre 2006
Par F. Munro-smith - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
Whilst Gordon Ramsay is an excellent chef and I have enjoyed many of his books, I am was very disappointed when this book arrived this morning to find that it is an identical copy of his 2004 book 'Secrets'. So, if you already own 'Secrets', DO NOT BUY THIS BOOK!!!
13 internautes sur 13 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Excellent Book with Delicious Results! 7 janvier 2008
Par L. C. Jones - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
I bought this book after seeing all the Gordon Ramsey TV shows. His food sounded so good I simply had to try it. True to his creed on his shows, his food is (mostly) simple. Some recipes take a little more effort, but certainly are not difficult. The extra effort is due to the complete refusal to use short cut ingredients and pre made anything. His recipes require fresh ingredients, no surprise.

The results, frankly, are more than worth it. WOW! The simple joy of eating a gravy which is by itself a varied taste experience is worth it. (People were coming over repeatedly to visit and asking if there was any leftover gravy practically every day!)

After cooking and eating this way, one wants to kick themselves for having accepted lesser quality. It also makes you wonder how so little extra convenience could have been worth the jump to a lower standard of food found in today's cooking. Another bonus; I found I understood more of the finer complexities of ingredients ability to intermingle and what goes well together. This is helpful when you take your recipes off plan to please your own pallet.

I would compare the book to Julia Childs Mastering The Art of French Cooking; much easier recipes, results less complex, food tastes just as good if good food is what you are after. (Taking nothing away from Julia Childs book, which is excellent, but far more complex)Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Volume One

Buy it! Cook with it! Enjoy eating the results!
4 internautes sur 4 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
A great book from a top notch chef! 7 février 2008
Par K. Olsen-Keyser - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
This is one of those cook books put together by a "TV Chef" that may seem somewhere between pretentious and useful. Some of the recipes such as "Guinea Hen with Pomegranate" and "Skate with a Sherry Vinegar and Caper Sauce" may seem over the top to the average cook, but if you look closely at the other ingredients, substitutions can easily be made with fantastic results ie: chicken for Guinea Hen and cod or flounder for the Skate. Such is the brilliance of Ramsay.

Simpler recipes such as "Chicken Pot Pie", "Warm Red Mullet Salad", "Roasted Tomato Soup" and "Brazed Pork" have a sense of home cooking and traditional fare. Anyone who has ever watched his Kitchen Nightmare series will know that Chef Ramsay is all about simplicity and good old fashioned cooking. Sure he can do frou-frou, but some of the best dishes he introduces to failing chefs are cheap to make and easy to produce.

But beyond the recipes, Ramsay takes the time to show us some great little kitchen tricks such as cleaning crab, the secret to perfect lobster medallions, and how to tie a rolled pork roast. In the back of the book are invaluable recipes for sauces, dressings and stocks.
9 internautes sur 11 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
A superb collection of inventive and delectable treats 7 septembre 2005
Par Midwest Book Review - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
Gorgeous full-color photography of mouth-watering creations illustrates In The Heat Of The Kitchen, a collection of top- notch recipes by Gordon Ramsay, acclaimed chef, restaurateur, and host of the hit television show "Hell's Kitchen." Exquisite dishes include Herb Brioche Crusted Mussels, Chicken Fricassee with Peas and Fava Beans, Wild Rice Jambalaya, Chilled Plum Soup, Passion Fruit and Orange Tart, and many more. Peppered with cooking tips and tricks - such as separating the legs from the breast of a bird one is about to cook, in order to avoid overcooking one part or undercooking another - In The Heat Of The Kitchen is a superb collection of inventive and delectable treats ideal for intermediate to advanced chefs.
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