Commencez à lire In Translation: Translators on Their Work and What It Means sur votre Kindle dans moins d'une minute. Vous n'avez pas encore de Kindle ? Achetez-le ici Ou commencez à lire dès maintenant avec l'une de nos applications de lecture Kindle gratuites.

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

 
 
 

Essai gratuit

Découvrez gratuitement un extrait de ce titre

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Tout le monde peut lire les livres Kindle, même sans un appareil Kindle, grâce à l'appli Kindle GRATUITE pour les smartphones, les tablettes et les ordinateurs.
In Translation: Translators on Their Work and What It Means
 
Agrandissez cette image
 

In Translation: Translators on Their Work and What It Means [Format Kindle]

Esther Allen , Susan Bernofsky

Prix conseillé : EUR 21,62 De quoi s'agit-il ?
Prix éditeur - format imprimé : EUR 24,53
Prix Kindle : EUR 15,13 TTC & envoi gratuit via réseau sans fil par Amazon Whispernet
Économisez : EUR 9,40 (38%)

Formats

Prix Amazon Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle EUR 15,13  
Relié EUR 75,21  
Broché EUR 25,02  




Loterie de l'App-Shop Amazon: Une chance de gagner jusqu'à 1000 euros pour votre shopping de Noël! Offre à durée limitée. sur l'App-Shop pour Android. Profitez-en et partagez la nouvelle. En savoir plus.


Les clients ayant acheté cet article ont également acheté


Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

The most comprehensive collection of perspectives on translation to date, this anthology features essays by some of the world’s most skillful writers and translators, including Haruki Murakami, Alice Kaplan, Peter Cole, Eliot Weinberger, Forrest Gander, and José Manuel Prieto. Discussing the process and possibilities of their art, they cast translation as a fine balance between scholarly and creative expression. The volume provides students and professionals with much-needed guidance on technique and style, while also affirming for all readers the cultural, political, and aesthetic relevance of their work.

These essays focus on translations to and from a diverse group of languages, including Japanese, Turkish, Arabic, and Hindi, as well as frequently encountered European languages, such as French, Spanish, Italian, German, Polish, and Russian. Contributors speak on craft, aesthetic choices, theoretical approaches, and the politics of global cultural exchange, touching on the concerns and challenges that currently affect translators working in an era of globalization. Responding to the growing popularity of translation programs, literature in translation, and the increasing need to cultivate versatile practitioners, this anthology serves as a definitive resource for those seeking a modern understanding of the craft.

Détails sur le produit


En savoir plus sur l'auteur

Découvrez des livres, informez-vous sur les écrivains, lisez des blogs d'auteurs et bien plus encore.

Commentaires en ligne

Il n'y a pas encore de commentaires clients sur Amazon.fr
5 étoiles
4 étoiles
3 étoiles
2 étoiles
1 étoiles
Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.5 étoiles sur 5  2 commentaires
4 internautes sur 4 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Language will never seem the same again 10 décembre 2013
Par G. Wagner - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle
This is an excellent collection of essays by translators – those mostly invisible souls whose work allows us access to the literature of the world. I was delighted to be enlightened about what they do, and how they do it; translators are artists and authors fundamentally in the act of translation. As the essayists explain, translation entails so much more than finding an equivalent word in the 'other' language – although that alone can pose substantial difficulties. A translator tries to convey the meaning, the sense, the sound, the feeling, of the original work, to create the same response from the reader in the new language. There are questions of, what will the background of the new reader be? Who does the translated work 'belong to' – who authored it? What is more important: the form of the original work (rhyme, meter, structure) or the meaning – and can those things even be separated? How can you evoke colloquialisms or slang, or should you even try? How 'foreign' should a translation sound, and what about translations of archaic texts; should they be put into modern vernacular? Endless and fascinating questions. I loved this book. I felt I was introduced to a new universe, and not only translation, but language itself, will never look the same again.
I received a copy from the San Francisco Book Review in exchange for an honest review. The opinions are entirely my own.
1 internautes sur 4 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
2.0 étoiles sur 5 Interesting but obtuse writing style. 10 novembre 2013
Par Amazon Customer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
Interesting, but very obtuse writing style. Recommended for all translators, linguists, or other with interests in the translation field, but is a very slow read, and what seems to be an attempt at overly obtuse and erudite language style.
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ?   Dites-le-nous

Discussions entre clients

Le forum concernant ce produit
Discussion Réponses Message le plus récent
Pas de discussions pour l'instant

Posez des questions, partagez votre opinion, gagnez en compréhension
Démarrer une nouvelle discussion
Thème:
Première publication:
Aller s'identifier
 

Rechercher parmi les discussions des clients
Rechercher dans toutes les discussions Amazon
   


Rechercher des articles similaires par rubrique