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Inside Apple (English Edition)
 
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Inside Apple (English Edition) [Format Kindle]

Adam Lashinsky
5.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (2 commentaires client)

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Descriptions du produit

Revue de presse

Adam Lashinsky, one of America's best and most diligent technology reporters, has produced a fascinating glimpse inside Apple as it makes its transition into the post-Jobs era. It's filled with colorful reporting and smart analysis that offer lessons not just about Apple but about creative business leadership in general.—Walter Isaacson, author of Steve Jobs

Frankly, a business book hasn't grabbed me like that in a long-time.
Bob Sutton, author of Good Boss, Bad Boss and The No Asshole Rule.


I'm not a heavy reader. It's extremely rare that I'll read a book in one sitting. This one kept me hooked start to finish - I could not put it down.—John Tokash, co-founder at Kartoffl.ly


Apple, Inc. could teach the Chinese a few tricks about secrecy. In this crisply written, engrossing book, Adam Lashinsky lifts the veil on how Apple really works and why it has been such as astonishing success. That is yesterday. What this book also does is explore tomorrow, including the challenges confronting a gifted group of executives trained by Steve Jobs but bereft of his leadership. I devoured this book in one sitting.—Ken Auletta, columnist for The New Yorker and the author of Googled: The End of the World As We Know It

Much more than Isaacson's, this is the one I've been waiting to read.—John Lilly, Partner at Greylock, former CEO at Mozilla.

Lashinsky's book, then, is an important rebuttal of today's Silicon Valley orthodoxy that a successful 21st century company needs to be organizationally flat and open. Lashinksy may indeed be telling a truth that most of us don't want to hear. Apple, rather than Google, is the future of corporate America. And that future will be defined by secrets and lies, rather than by transparency and truth.

TechCrunch

This book's real strength - besides lots of insight from people who knew and worked with Jobs, Cook and the rest of the executive team - is the way it frames different scenarios that could result from Apple sans Jobs... You get the feeling when reading this that people inside the company will be just as keen to pick up a copy as those of us on the outside.—Erica Ogg, GigaOm

"Inside Apple" makes a worthwhile companion to last year's best-selling "Steve Jobs," by Walter Isaacson. If Isaacson's book was the definitive biography of Apple's chief visionary, who died in October, then "Inside Apple" is a revealing guided tour of his greatest creation."—San Francisco Chronicle

Présentation de l'éditeur

In INSIDE APPLE, Adam Lashinsky provides readers with an insight on leadership and innovation. He introduces Apple business concepts like the 'DRI' (Apple's practice of assigning a Directly Responsible Individual to every task) and the Top 100 (an annual event where that year's top 100 up-and-coming executives were surreptitiously transported to a secret retreat with company founder Steve Jobs).

Based on numerous interviews, the book reveals exclusive new information about how Apple innovates, deals with its suppliers, and is handling the transition into the Post Jobs Era. While INSIDE APPLE provides a detailed investigation into the unique company, its lessons about leadership, product design and marketing are universal. INSIDE APPLE will appeal to anyone hoping to bring some of the Apple magic to their own company, career, or creative endeavour.

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Commentaires client les plus utiles
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Exceptionally Informative and Readable 16 juin 2013
Format:Relié
As a longtime fan of Apple’s products, I’ve read a lot about this iconic company over the years. Apple’s willingness to break with the traditions is legendary, and it’s this revolutionary aspect of its products that has earned it the iconoclastic reputation that it has. Most of this revolutionary zeal, and Apple’s overall approach to business, was, of course, based in the particular vision of Steve Jobs, its founder and the CEO during some of the company’s most successful days. My own understanding of Apple’s esthetic and business approach was too based on numerous articles and books on Steve Jobs that I’ve read over the years. However, with his passing, the questions of how well will the company be able to carry on with his legacy and success will persist for some time. In order to better understand what is at stake, it’s important to take a closer look at the Apple itself, going beyond the man that was synonymous with it for many decades of its existence.

“Inside Apple” is a book that, as the title suggests, pulls the curtain ever so slightly away from Apple’s recondite inner workings and exposes those innards to the wider world. Apple is notoriously secretive about all aspects of its work, and this attitude of secrecy has a spell even over its former workers. Consequently, it has not been easy to gather valuable and verifiable information about the inside workings of Apple. This book, however, manages to present a very convincing and cogent view of what makes Apple unique. It shows how Apple’s business and management styles go against almost all business school wisdom that has been taught over the past several decades.
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 An objective view of Apple. 19 février 2013
Format:Format Kindle
Rated 5 stars because of the non-biased, prejudice-less writing and thinking.
Adam Lashinsky writes thing as they are, and as much as he knows Apple (hint: a lot).

Some people may find that this book is depicting a tarnished company, and that criticism is harsh. Feel free to disagree.

I have seen how Apple with my own eyes after reading this book. Lashinsky is not stretching the truth at all (for good and bad aspects!)
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 étoiles sur 5  115 commentaires
89 internautes sur 96 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 I stayed up all night reading this book... 25 janvier 2012
Par Kenneth Cone - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
...which is saying something. I haven't done that since I was a teenager and I'm in my forties. To compare this book to Isaacson's biography of Steve Jobs, which is arguably the best biography I've ever read, would not be fair; although everyone is going to do that. I struggled with the comparison myself.

Bottom Line: These are two very different books, and this is a great compliment to Job's biography.

Did I learn anything ground breaking? I had hoped to, but I'm not sure I did. (Especially in the "Secrecy chapter - I wanted more!) Still, I did learn a LOT of small things that, added together, made the book feel groundbreaking. I've highlighted several passages in my kindle edition, but I feel like it would be cheating to share more than one with you. My personal favorite has to do with Apple's seeming lack of career paths for their employees; it goes like this:

"...what if it turns out that all that thinking is wrong? What if companies encouraged employees to be satisfied where they are, because they're good at what they do, not to mention because that might be what's best for shareholders?" Well, what if? The Peter Principle is hard to fight against; even more difficult to compete with are the ambitions of people. Adam mentions a saying that I've heard before, "Everyone inside Apple is trying to get out, and everyone outside is trying to get in."

Well, I'm both of those. After reading this book, I still would love to work for Apple; and I'd hate it too. What an exquisite company!
Most revealing to me is that while employees who are entrepreneurs "typically don't stick around for more than a couple of years," the company still manages to thrive in an oddly entrepreneurial way. At the same time, these entrepreneurs had "rich, productive experiences at Apple, where there ... was room for only one..."

Last, there is some speculation and discussion about the struggles Apple will have in keeping it's culture. The consequences of Steve Job's intense involvement followed by his rapid second departure will only really be understood over time - a _lot_ of time. Yet, I found this discussion to be better than any I've read on the web. At the same time, what human could possibly read all that has been written about Apple since late last year?

Despite my desire not to succumb to comparing this book with Isaacson's, I'll end with that comparison: The biography was bigger and the best in its class, and while this book is a quick, easy read, it is the first _real_ book in its class. I probably won't read the biography again, except for reference; I see myself reading Lashinsky's book again and again, cogitating on the philosophies and learning more during each read.

If I could, I'd give the book 4.8 stars, but since I have to round, I don't begrudge it the five stars that I expect most will give. You did a decent job with this book, Mr. Lashinsky, and I'm happy to recommend it.
46 internautes sur 50 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Decent, but nothing new 2 février 2012
Par Christopher - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle
This marks the third incarnation of Mr. Lashinsky's "inside" look at the workings of Apple. The Fortune Magazine article was quite good, considering the format limitations. However, as he expanded the story, first in to a short ebook and now the full length version, cracks began to show in the material. What was informative and precise, in short form, began to read as rehashed and bloated, in longer form. Simply put, "Inside Apple" is merely a magazine article which has been padded in to a book.

Now, that's not to say it's a bad read, by any means. Mr. Lashinsky has compiled a commendable briefing on the basics of how Apple operates. He has also added a great deal of analysis and varied opinions, which raise some valid concerns. However, if you have read just about any of the books previously written on Apple/Jobs, you've unquestionably encountered the same stories, concepts, and "inside" information before. What you really have here is a summary of key points from all that has been written about the subject before.

So, a good read, if you want a quick run through of the basic ideology, with some critical analysis thrown in. Just don't expect to find anything particularly new or shocking.
32 internautes sur 40 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Great shoe-leather reporting 20 janvier 2012
Par Philip Elmer-DeWitt - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
Adam Lashinsky's Inside Apple is likely to be closely read inside and outside the company. Scheduled to be released this week, it's the most important Apple book since Walter Isaacson's Steve Jobs and is, in many ways, the perfect companion to the Jobs biography.

If Isaacson's was the Time Magazine or People Weekly version of the Apple story, what Lashinsky delivers -- appropriately enough, given the magazine he works for -- is the Fortune version.

Lashinsky's goal was to understand the company Jobs built as a business. But unlike, Isaacson, Lashinsky didn't have Jobs' cooperation. Nor did the company make any Apple executives or employees available. So like a correspondent debriefing refugees at the border of a war zone, Lashinsky interviewed scores of collaborators, competitors and former employees after they left the confines of Apple's closely guarded Cupertino campus.

The result is a deep dive into an extraordinary enterprise that has disrupted one industry after another while ignoring -- if not deliberately breaking -- most of the rules of modern business management.
10 internautes sur 11 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Is Apple More Like the FBI than a Tech Firm? 5 avril 2012
Par James Casey - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié|Achat vérifié
Adam Lashinsky's book Inside Apple; How America's Most Admired and Secretive Company Really Works, is a fascinating look at the company that recently passed Exxon-Mobil as the world's richest private enterprise. The most significant aspect of the book is the delta between the company's public and private personas - much of it attributable to its late and iconic CEO, Steve Jobs. Publically, Apple is a forward leaning, socially responsible mega corporation that likes to be perceived as a small start up. Jobs grew up a political and social liberal who experimented with hard drugs before he dropped out of college; he was a vegan who studied Eastern mystic religions and supported Barack Obama in the 2008 election. Apple's early customers were a distinct minority of computer users who tended toward the eclectic and artistic. Its corporate image is often mistakenly compared to other Silicon Valley tech companies like Google and Facebook, where free gourmet food, collegiality, and an open campus are part of the cultural environment.

Privately however, Apple rivals government agencies like the CIA and FBI for the way it controls information and personnel. "Need to know", "compartmentalization", and internal "non-disclosure agreements" are concepts very familiar to those who work inside the nation's intelligence community, but inside Apple? Absolutely, claims Lashinsky who details how Apple's secrecy applies to every aspect of its business processes. Much of this makes sense; If your business model depends on flashy annual press conferences to launch the latest iPad, or iPhone, you better insure you're making the best use of that buzz as possible. The logic includes keeping your product completely under wraps until the big launch.

However, this culture transcends merely keeping the latest products secret until Steve Jobs has an opportunity to state at the press conference, "And one more thing," before unveiling the newest gadget. For example, Apple forbade its top executives from belonging to other company's boards of directors (except for Jobs). Employees were discouraged from any outside activities that kept them from totally focusing on their work at Apple. At the FBI, agents are still forbidden from engaging in employment outside the Bureau, and for more than 60 years, most of them under J. Edgar Hoover agents were discouraged from attending graduate or law school, even on their own time. "Agents who had time to go to school part time were obviously under assigned," went the FBI's logic. Jobs was notorious and unapologetic for not being involved in any philanthropic causes, and corporately, the company was no better. This was one of the first changes made by Tim Cook when he became CEO and Apple immediately began matching employee contributions to charity.

Much of this was not unknown. Apple was terrifically famous for not hiring from the outside and only promoting from within. Of approximately 70,000 employees, "The 100," a secret group hand picked by Jobs made all the important decisions that Jobs did not make himself. Employees were warned in briefings and internal email, (some personally by Jobs), that discussing Apple business, even with other Apple employees who lacked a requisite need to know about a project, could lead to immediate firing. At the local watering hole outside Apple's Cupertino California headquarters, it was rumored security personnel worked undercover in an attempt to pick up on unauthorized discussions. Whether they really did or not was irrelevant, employees believed they were there. Yet despite its multinational conglomerate standing, with a huge presence in questionably run labor environments such as China, Apple somehow escapes the rue of the Occupy movements and other anti-capitalist causes. One could argue Jobs was as effective at manipulating Apple's public image as Hoover was with the FBI's during the height of his tenure.

Not surprisingly, not a single Apple employee officially commented on, or cooperated with Lashinsky on the book even though he was well known inside tech circles for covering Apple for Fortune Magazine for years. He's a self-described Apple-o-file who came to their products reluctantly after falling hard for the iPod and iTunes. Which leads to my biggest disappointment with the otherwise excellent companion book to Walter Isaacson's recent biography on Steve Jobs:

In 2010 and 2011 Apple was publically involved in two scandals involving lost prototypes of upcoming iPhones. In both cases, Apple's own employees lost the phones while imbibing in local bars, and in both cases Apple aggressively pursued anybody associated with the lost phones. Some thought their tactics were heavy-handed including trying to prosecute an individual who purchased one of the phones on the Internet. In the other case, Apple security officers conducted a questionably legal search of a private apartment (without finding the phone) while police stood guard outside. In both cases, normally velvet-gloved Bay-area law enforcement agencies seemed overly chummy with Apple's security apparatus, and appeared only too happy to protect their wealthiest constituent. That not a word of either incident is chronicled in a book subtitled "How America's Most Admired and Secretive Company Really Works" and which purports to describe the company's culture of secrecy is curious beyond description. Otherwise, the book is an Amazon Five Stars. jamesmcasey.com
5 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Exceptionally Informative and Readable 16 juin 2013
Par Dr. Bojan Tunguz - Publié sur Amazon.com
Achat vérifié
As a longtime fan of Apple's products, I've read a lot about this iconic company over the years. Apple's willingness to break with the traditions is legendary, and it's this revolutionary aspect of its products that has earned it the iconoclastic reputation that it has. Most of this revolutionary zeal, and Apple's overall approach to business, was, of course, based in the particular vision of Steve Jobs, its founder and the CEO during some of the company's most successful days. My own understanding of Apple's esthetic and business approach was too based on numerous articles and books on Steve Jobs that I've read over the years. However, with his passing, the questions of how well will the company be able to carry on with his legacy and success will persist for some time. In order to better understand what is at stake, it's important to take a closer look at the Apple itself, going beyond the man that was synonymous with it for many decades of its existence.

"Inside Apple" is a book that, as the title suggests, pulls the curtain ever so slightly away from Apple's recondite inner workings and exposes those innards to the wider world. Apple is notoriously secretive about all aspects of its work, and this attitude of secrecy has a spell even over its former workers. Consequently, it has not been easy to gather valuable and verifiable information about the inside workings of Apple. This book, however, manages to present a very convincing and cogent view of what makes Apple unique. It shows how Apple's business and management styles go against almost all business school wisdom that has been taught over the past several decades. Apple has often been accused of being extremely rigid, and it's surprising that anyone form the Silicon Valley would ever want to work there, and little less actually thrive. However, this book makes the claim that the rigidity of Apple's structure and the extreme compartmentalization of different divisions and subdivisions within the company, all serve the purpose of fostering a sense of small teamwork that most big tech companies eventually lose. It is debatable if that sense of teamwork can last, especially now that the visionary input of Steve Jobs is gone.

This is a very well researched and extremely readable account of one of the world's most intriguing, successful and iconic companies. It will be of interest to anyone who wants to know more not only about the current technological trends, but also about how big corporations work. I enjoyed this book immensely and would highly recommend it.
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