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It's Not Rocket Science: And other irritating modern cliches (English Edition) [Format Kindle]

Clive Whichelow , Hugh Murray

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Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

Over last thirty years, new technology, fashion, and social set-ups have spawned new cliches galore. Everything on the Internet is available at the 'click of a mouse', TV presenters ask the audience to 'give it up' when they want them to applaud, call centres tell us 'we value your call' even though 'all our operators are busy'. And if you're 'gobsmacked' by all this you may be told to 'get a life', 'chill out' or 'whatever'.

It's Not Rocket Science sifts through all aspects of modern life to find the most prevalent, ubiquitous and downright irritating cliches of our age. This high-octane, caffeine-fuelled, dictionary of cliches highlights the freshly-hackneyed phrases we're being subjected to 24/7.

So how good is that? And what's not to like?

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 163 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 192 pages
  • Editeur : Piatkus (6 février 2014)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B00HR8QTN0
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Non activé
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°420.878 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
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Commentaires en ligne

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Amazon.com: 4.0 étoiles sur 5  4 commentaires
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A roadmap for modern communication 16 mars 2008
Par Tim Johnson - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
I finished this lovely little book only minutes ago and feel a tremendous respect for Whichelow and Murray for having threaded their way through what passes for contemporary oral and written communication.
It is one thing to recognise the myriad cliches that abound in English (as I feel knowingly comfortable with) but it is much more difficult to write a recognisable definition of exactly what these cliche's mean. For instance on page 192, how do you compose a meaningful definition for "like". Teen-speak is barely understandable, particularly the version used by migrant kids on the streets of Melbourne.

It's Not Rocket Science is an impressive book; I found words that I did not even consider cliches in this book, words that were explained and defined very well.
The book was published in the UK, I live in Australia and the words and expressions used are common on North American television; we must assume therefore, that the authors have a great cross-cultural understanding of current English language usage.

The first 76 pages are devoted to cliches that are common in contemporary language and the remaining pages, to page 194, are devoted to chapters dealing with media cliches, business cliches, social cliches plus several other subsets of modern speech. The speech documented under business in the group of real estate phrases is particularly funny.
For instance: "much sought after, popular area, It's got potential" plus many more and we all probably know pretty well what is being masqueraded
with these words.

I feel afraid in writing this little comment because I am, unfortunately, a frequent user of cliches: I find them useful as written shorthand. As I write this, I see that I must rephrase my language because I am about to use a dreaded cliche. I suppose this either says that I am a terrible writer who should resit seven years of primary school or it demonstrates why this book was written--our language is suffering so much by the cliche onslaught.
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Stocking Filler Material 13 janvier 2011
Par Spider Monkey - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
`It's Not Rocket Science and Other Irritating Modern Clichés', as the titles suggest, is a book looking at various clichés and where they come from, as well as having some of their own humorous interpretations of alterative meanings. It is divided into chapters covering clichés related to general, media, entertainment, commercial, business, political and social and each section is in alphabetical order. Some entries are genuinely interesting and other will raise a wry smile, but this isn't full on belly holding humour and this is best to dip into at odd moments. Maybe when you are spending the odd ten minutes in the bathroom as this is definitely toilet side reading. This is light hearted and easy to read and although its not great, it is a worthy addition to the pulp humour genre. It's a stocking filler and not much more.

Feel free to check out my blog which can be found on my profile page.
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Good, but at the end of the day, not great 19 août 2010
Par Gary S. Shogren - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié|Achat vérifié
I'd expected more chuckles. The editors did locate a number of annoying phrasettes, but many of their commentaries were obvious, along the lines of "now, isn't that silly?" or "who really would take this literally?"

Even if they skip the Intro, American readers will pick up early on that the writers are British. Some British cliches have not crossed the ocean; however, the greater surprise for me is that so many of them ARE transatlantic - blame it on movies and TV. For example, "going commando" as a cliche for a man going without underwear was created or circulated by "Friends", the editors believe. Still, it was fun to hear a few British ones which I plan to use before they become Americanized. "Happy-clappy" is my favorite, as in, "Oh, you know, it's that new kind of church with drums and guitars, real happy-clappy".
5.0 étoiles sur 5 This is a delightful book 23 août 2011
Par rlweaverii - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
Book review by Richard L. Weaver II, Ph.D.

I found this book delightful, not just because of the cliches the authors have found and explained, but because it was written by two British authors. For me, this added a unique dimension for in every case, I was interested to see how many of our common phrases had survived the trip overseas. That is, I wanted to see how they were defined by non-Americans.

The authors cover a range of cliches: general, media, entertainment, commercial, business, political, and social. I think young people today are those who might benefit most from reading such a book as this. What I found in my more than twenty years of teaching public communication was simply that when I pointed out a phrase to a student and labeled it a cliche, he or she was totally unaware that it was. They simply did not have the background or experience to know it. (That generalization was not true of all students, of course.)

Another group of people who might benefit from reading this is those who write greeting cards. Can you imagine it? There are already so many cards so full of cliches that we don't need any more, that is true; however, when a slacker writer is looking for content for the blank screen in front of him or her, this book can certainly supply the missing "content." There is so much here to fill so many more cards with oh so many more "wonderful" cliches. (They appeal to the masses!)

What I found to be a challenging and rather interesting exercise when I read this book was improving on the authors' explanations. It wasn't the fact that "I know better than they do," but, coming from an American perspective (rather than a British one), many of the cliches could have benefited from a better (more U.S. friendly) definition (not all of them, of course).

I have always spelled "DOH!" (the "self-flagellating expression of dismay") as "DUH!" although, I admit, I seldom use the expression in my writing.

"Gobsmacked," meaning surprised, is a cliche with which I was totally unfamiliar, but it originated in Liverpool, UK, and that may be a good reason.

I loved the expression "Happy-clappy" to describe modern church services. I had never heard that one either. "Utilise" (meaning use) is another word I have never heard before.

Of the other cliches in the book, I have to say I have some familiarity with all of them. I thought some of the explanations/definitions were a bit weak, but making up for their weakness was the authors' use of humor, which was delightful.
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