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King Richard III (English Edition) [Format Kindle]

William Shakespeare
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Amazon.co.uk

"Now is the winter of our discontent," intones Richard, Duke of Gloucester at the beginning of Shakespeare's Richard III, one of his most abidingly popular plays, and one of the most chilling portrayals of political tyranny ever seen on stage. Richard emerges from the chaos which surrounds the reign of Henry VI, already dramatised by Shakespeare earlier in his career, determined to become king by removing his elder brother Edward IV by convincing him that their brother Clarence is plotting against the crown. The deaths of both Clarence and Edward take Richard inexorably towards the crown, and the series of murders and conspiracies that Richard masterminds confirms his claim that "I am determined to prove a villain". Richard's political and sexual charisma are truly chilling, and his seduction of Lady Anne, over her husband's corpse is one of the most disturbing scenes in Shakespeare. At another level, the play is also a strongly anti-Yorkist play, which has a vested interest in portraying Richard as such as vicious tyrant before seeing him toppled, ushering in a period of rule which prefigured the Tudor dynasty of which Elizabeth I was herself a part. The play has had a deep and lasting influence on audiences and writers; Brecht rewrote the play as The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui, while both Laurance Olivier and Ian Mckellen have produced memorable film versions of Richard III, the latter updating the play into a 1930s fascist state ruled over by a Richard akin to Oswald Mosley. --Jerry Brotton

Extrait

Chapter 1

list of parts

RICHARD, Duke of Gloucester, later King RICHARD III
Duke of CLARENCE, his brother
Duke of BUCKINGHAM
Lord HASTINGS, the Lord Chamberlain
Sir William CATESBY
Sir Richard RATCLIFFE
Lord LOVELL
BRACKENBURY, Lord Lieutenant of the Tower
Lord Stanley, Earl of DERBY (sometimes addressed as Derby and sometimes as Stanley, here given speech prefix Derby)
KING EDWARD IV, Gloucester's older brother
QUEEN ELIZABETH, his wife
PRINCE EDWARD, their older son
Duke of YORK, their younger son
Lord RIVERS, Elizabeth's brother
Lord GREY, Elizabeth's son by her first husband
Marquis of DORSET, his brother
Sir Thomas VAUGHAN
Lady ANNE, Widow of Edward, Prince of Wales, later Duchess of Gloucester
QUEEN MARGARET, widow of
Henry VI
DUCHESS OF YORK, mother to Gloucester, Clarence, Edward IV
BOY Clarence's
DAUGHTER children
Earl of RICHMOND, later King Henry VII
Earl of OXFORD
Sir JAMES BLUNT
Sir WALTER HERBERT
Sir WILLIAM BRANDON
Duke of NORFOLK
Earl of SURREY
CARDINAL, Archbishop of
Canterbury
ARCHBISHOP OF YORK
BISHOP OF ELY
SIR CHRISTOPHER, a priest
Sir John, a PRIEST
Lord MAYOR of London
Three CITIZENS
JAMES TYRRELL
Two MURDERERS
MESSENGERS
KEEPER
PURSUIVANT
PAGE
Ghost of KING HENRY VI
Ghost of EDWARD, his son
Two Bishops, Soldiers,
Halberdiers, Gentlemen, Lords, Citizens, Attendants


Act 1 Scene 1 running scene 1

Enter Richard, Duke of Gloucester, solus

RICHARD Now is the winter of our discontent
Made glorious summer by this son of York:
And all the clouds that loured upon our house
In the deep bosom of the ocean buried.
Now are our brows bound with victorious wreaths,
Our bruisèd arms hung up for monuments,
Our stern alarums changed to merry meetings,
Our dreadful marches to delightful measures.
Grim-visaged war hath smoothed his wrinkled front,
And now, instead of mounting barbèd steeds
To fright the souls of fearful adversaries,
He capers nimbly in a lady's chamber
To the lascivious pleasing of a lute.
But I, that am not shaped for sportive tricks,
Nor made to court an amorous looking-glass:
I, that am rudely stamped, and want love's majesty
To strut before a wanton ambling nymph:
I, that am curtailed of this fair proportion,
Cheated of feature by dissembling nature,
Deformed, unfinished, sent before my time
Into this breathing world, scarce half made up,
And that so lamely and unfashionable
That dogs bark at me as I halt by them -
Why, I, in this weak piping time of peace,
Have no delight to pass away the time,
Unless to see my shadow in the sun
And descant on mine own deformity.
And therefore, since I cannot prove a lover,
To entertain these fair well-spoken days,
I am determinèd to prove a villain
And hate the idle pleasures of these days.
Plots have I laid, inductions dangerous,
By drunken prophecies, libels and dreams,
To set my brother Clarence and the king
In deadly hate the one against the other.
And if King Edward be as true and just
As I am subtle, false and treacherous,
This day should Clarence closely be mewed up
About a prophecy, which says that 'G'
Of Edward's heirs the murderer shall be.
Dive, thoughts, down to my soul: here Clarence
comes.-

Enter Clarence, guarded, and Brackenbury

Brother, good day. What means this armèd guard
That waits upon your grace?

CLARENCE His majesty,
Tend'ring my person's safety, hath appointed
This conduct to convey me to th'Tower.

RICHARD Upon what cause?

CLARENCE Because my name is George.

RICHARD Alack, my lord, that fault is none of yours.
He should, for that, commit your godfathers.
O, belike his majesty hath some intent
That you should be new-christened in the Tower.
But what's the matter, Clarence, may I know?

CLARENCE Yea, Richard, when I know, but I protest
As yet I do not. But, as I can learn,
He hearkens after prophecies and dreams,
And from the cross-row plucks the letter G,
And says a wizard told him that by 'G'
His issue disinherited should be:
And, for my name of George begins with G,
It follows in his thought that I am he.
These, as I learn, and such like toys as these,
Hath moved his highness to commit me now.

RICHARD Why, this it is when men are ruled by women:
'Tis not the king that sends you to the Tower,
My lady Grey his wife, Clarence, 'tis she
That tempts him to this harsh extremity.
Was it not she and that good man of worship,
Anthony Woodville, her brother there,
That made him send Lord Hastings to the Tower,
From whence this present day he is delivered?
We are not safe, Clarence, we are not safe.

CLARENCE By heaven, I think there is no man secure
But the queen's kindred and night-walking heralds
That trudge betwixt the king and Mistress Shore.
Heard you not what an humble suppliant
Lord Hastings was to her, for his delivery?

RICHARD Humbly complaining to her deity
Got my Lord Chamberlain his liberty.
I'll tell you what: I think it is our way,
If we will keep in favour with the king,
To be her men and wear her livery.
The jealous o'erworn widow and herself,
Since that our brother dubbed them gentlewomen,
Are mighty gossips in our monarchy.

BRACKENBURY I beseech your graces both to pardon me:
His majesty hath straitly given in charge
That no man shall have private conference,
Of what degree soever, with your brother.

RICHARD Even so, an please your worship, Brackenbury,
You may partake of anything we say.
We speak no treason, man: we say the king
Is wise and virtuous, and his noble queen
Well struck in years, fair and not jealous.
We say that Shore's wife hath a pretty foot,
A cherry lip, a bonny eye, a passing pleasing tongue,
And that the queen's kindred are made gentlefolks.
How say you sir? Can you deny all this?

BRACKENBURY With this, my lord, myself have nought
to do.

RICHARD Naught to do with Mistress Shore? I tell thee,
fellow,
He that doth naught with her, excepting one,
Were best to do it secretly, alone.

BRACKENBURY What one, my lord?

RICHARD Her husband, knave. Wouldst thou betray me?

BRACKENBURY I do beseech your grace to pardon me,
and withal
Forbear your conference with the noble duke.

CLARENCE We know thy charge, Brackenbury, and will
obey.

RICHARD We are the queen's abjects, and must obey.-
Brother, farewell. I will unto the king,
And whatsoe'er you will employ me in,
Were it to call King Edward's widow sister,
I will perform it to enfranchise you.
Meantime, this deep disgrace in brotherhood
Touches me deeper than you can imagine. Embraces him

CLARENCE I know it pleaseth neither of us well.

RICHARD Well, your imprisonment shall not be long.
I will deliver you or else lie for you.
Meantime, have patience.

CLARENCE I must perforce. Farewell.

Exit Clarence [led by Brackenbury and Guards]

RICHARD Go, tread the path that thou shalt ne'er return.
Simple, plain Clarence, I do love thee so
That I will shortly send thy soul to heaven,
If heaven will take the present at our hands.
But who comes here? The new-delivered Hastings?

Enter Lord Hastings

HASTINGS Good time of day unto my gracious lord.

RICHARD As much unto my good Lord Chamberlain.
Well are you welcome to this open air.
How hath your lordship brooked imprisonment?

HASTINGS With patience, noble lord, as prisoners must.
But I shall live, my lord, to give them thanks
That were the cause of my imprisonment.

RICHARD No doubt, no doubt. And so shall Clarence too,
For they that were your enemies are his,
And have prevailed as much on him as you.

HASTINGS More pity that the eagles should be mewed,
Whiles kites and buzzards play at liberty.

RICHARD What news abroad?

HASTINGS No news so bad abroad as this at home:
The king is sickly, weak and melancholy,
And his physicians fear him mightily.

RICHARD Now, by Saint John, that news is bad indeed.
O, he hath kept an evil diet long,
And overmuch consumed his royal person.
'Tis very grievous to be thought upon.
Where is he, in his bed?

HASTINGS He is.

RICHARD Go you before, and I will follow you.

Exit Hastings

He cannot live, I hope, and must not die
Till George be packed with post-horse up to heaven.
I'll in to urge his hatred more to Clarence,
With lies well steeled with weighty arguments.
And, if I fail not in my deep intent,
Clarence hath not another day to live:
Which done, God take King Edward to his mercy,
And leave the world for me to bustle in.
For then I'll marry Warwick's youngest daughter.
What though I killed her husband and her father?
The readiest way to make the wench amends
Is to become her husband and her father:
The which will I, not all so much for love
As for another secret close intent,
By marrying her which I must reach unto.
But yet I run before my horse to market:
Clarence still breathes, Edward still lives and reigns.
When they are gone, then must I count my gains.

Exit

Act 1 Scene 2 running scene 1 continues

Enter the corpse of Henry the Sixth with [Gentlemen bearing] halberds to guard it, Lady Anne being the mourner

ANNE Set down, set down your honourable load -
If honour may be shrouded in a hearse -
Whilst I awhile obsequiously lament
Th'untimely fall of virtuous Lancaster. [They set down the coffin]
Poor key-cold figure of a holy king,
Pale ashes of the house of Lancaster,
Thou bloodless remnant of that royal blood,
Be it lawful that I invocate thy ghost,
To hear the lamentations of poor Anne,
Wife to thy Edward, to thy slaughtered son,
Stabbed by the selfsame hand that made these
wounds.
Lo, in these windows that let forth thy life,
I pour the helpless balm of my poor eyes.
O, cursèd be the hand that made these holes:
Cursed the heart that had the heart to do it:
Cursed the blood that let this blood from hence!
More direful hap betide that hated wretch
That makes us wretched by the death of thee
Than I can wish to wolves, to spiders, toads,
Or any creeping venomed thing that lives.
If ever he have child, abortive be it,
Prodigious, and untimely brought to light,
Whose ugly and unnatural aspect
May fright the hopeful mother at the view,
And that be heir to his unhappiness.
If ever he have wife, let her be made
More miserable by the death of him
Than I am made by my young lord and thee.-
Come, now towards Chertsey with your holy load,
Taken from Paul's to be interrèd there. [They lift the coffin]
And still as you are weary of this weight,
Rest you, whiles I lament King Henry's corpse.

Enter Richard, Duke of Gloucester

RICHARD Stay, you that bear the corpse, and set it down.

ANNE What black magician conjures up this fiend,
To stop devoted charitable deeds?

RICHARD Villains, set down the corpse, or, by Saint Paul,
I'll make a corpse of him that disobeys.

GENTLEMAN My lord, stand back, and let the coffin pass.

RICHARD Unmannered dog, stand'st thou when I
command.
Advance thy halberd higher than my breast,
Or, by Saint Paul, I'll strike thee to my foot,
And spurn upon thee, beggar, for thy boldness. [They set down the coffin]

ANNE What, do you tremble? Are you all afraid?
Alas, I blame you not, for you are mortal,
And mortal eyes cannot endure the devil.-
Avaunt, thou dreadful minister of hell!
Thou hadst but power over his mortal body,
His soul thou canst not have: therefore be gone.

RICHARD Sweet saint, for charity, be not so curst.

ANNE Foul devil, for God's sake, hence, and trouble us
not,
For thou hast made the happy earth thy hell,
Filled it with cursing cries and deep exclaims.
If thou delight to view thy heinous deeds,
Behold this pattern of thy butcheries.- ]Uncovers the body]
O, gentlemen, see, see dead Henry's wounds
Open their congealed mouths and bleed afresh.-
Blush, blush, thou lump of foul deformity,
For 'tis thy presence that exhales this blood
From cold and empty veins, where no blood dwells.
Thy deeds, inhuman and unnatural,
Provokes this deluge most unnatural.-
O God, which this blood mad'st, revenge his death!
O earth, which this blood drink'st, revenge his death!
Either heav'n with lightning strike the murd'rer
dead,
Or earth gape open wide and eat him quick,
As thou dost swallow up this good king's blood
Which his hell-governed arm hath butcherèd!

RICHARD Lady, you know no rules of charity,
Which renders good for bad, blessings for curses.

ANNE Villain, thou know'st nor law of God nor man:
No beast so fierce but knows some touch of pity.

RICHARD But I know none, and therefore am no beast.

ANNE O, wonderful, when devils tell the truth!

RICHARD More wonderful, when angels are so angry.
Vouchsafe, divine perfection of a woman,
Of these supposèd crimes to give me leave,
By circumstance but to acquit myself.

ANNE Vouchsafe, defused infection of man,
Of these known evils, but to give me leave,
By circumstance to curse thy cursèd self.

RICHARD Fairer than tongue can name thee, let me have
Some patient leisure to excuse myself.

ANNE Fouler than heart can think thee, thou canst make
No excuse current, but to hang thyself.

RICHARD By such despair, I should accuse myself.

ANNE And by despairing shalt thou stand excused
For doing worthy vengeance on thyself,
That didst unworthy slaughter upon others.

RICHARD Say that I slew them not.

ANNE Then say they were not slain.
But dead they are, and devilish slave, by thee.

RICHARD I did not kill your husband.

ANNE Why, then he is alive.

RICHARD Nay, he is dead, and slain by Edward's hands.

ANNE In thy foul throat thou liest: Queen Margaret saw
Thy murd'rous falchion smoking in his blood,
The which thou once didst bend against her breast,
But that thy brothers beat aside the point.

RICHARD I was provokèd by her sland'rous tongue,
That laid their guilt upon my guiltless shoulders.

ANNE Thou wast provokèd by thy bloody mind,
That never dream'st on aught but butcheries.
Didst thou not kill this king?

RICHARD I grant ye.

ANNE Dost grant me, hedgehog? Then, God grant me too
Thou mayst be damnèd for that wicked deed.
O, he was gentle, mild and virtuous!

RICHARD The better for the king of heaven that hath
him.

ANNE He is in heaven, where thou shalt never come.

RICHARD Let him thank me, that holp to send him
thither,
For he was fitter for that place than earth.

ANNE And thou unfit for any place but hell.

RICHARD Yes, one place else, if you will hear me name it.

ANNE Some dungeon.

RICHARD Your bedchamber.

ANNE I'll rest betide the chamber where thou liest.

RICHARD So will it, madam, till I lie with you.

ANNE I hope so.

RICHARD I know so. But, gentle Lady Anne,
To leave this keen encounter of our wits,
And fall something into a slower method:
Is not the causer of the timeless deaths
Of these Plantagenets, Henry and Edward,
As blameful as the executioner?

ANNE Thou wast the cause and most accursed effect.

RICHARD Your beauty was the cause of that effect.
Your beauty, that did haunt me in my sleep
To undertake the death of all the world,
So I might live one hour in your sweet bosom.

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Commentaires client les plus utiles
Par bernie
Format:Format Kindle
SECOND MURDER Zounds, he dies: I had forgot the reward.

There is no good place to start on the play "The Tragedy of Richard III" by Shakespeare without having spoilers. Yet people that know history or at least Shakespeare's version 1592 or 1593, or familiar with Virgil's "Historia Angliae" will want this book for a good copy of the details of the play.

This is the GLOUCESTER: "Now is the winterer of our discontent" play.

I have several hard copies but the kindle adds portability and text-to-speak.

I have a hunch we have not seen the last of Richard III. No telling what can be dug up now days.

The Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey

Richard III DVD ~ Ian McKellen
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 Très bien 8 novembre 2014
Par Céline
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
Rien a redire après tout ce n'est qu'un livre format e-book, très contente de l'achat et c'est très pratique pour mes cours (je n'aime pas écrire DANS mes livres alors que là c'est en format informatique donc ca va).
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 étoiles sur 5  72 commentaires
16 internautes sur 17 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Cambridge (Lull) edition one of the best intros. 13 juillet 2000
Par Dr. Richard D. Feinman - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
This edition has one of the best introductions I've read: informative, well-written and with photos from productions of R III. Just the section on Macbeth and Richard makes this top-notch. Even the Folio/Quarto stuff is interesting -- short and not pedantic. This is my choice for Richard III edition.
9 internautes sur 10 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 A bit over the top, but well done! 18 septembre 2000
Par meiringen - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Cassette|Achat vérifié
Stephens is a bit much as Richard (does he have to yell so often?) but the supporting cast, with Michael York in a multitude of roles, Dame Peggy Ashcroft as Margaret, Glenda Jackson as Lady Anne and Jeremy Brett as the Earl of Clarence (for once, the part is done right--Brett comes off as believable, not as a whiny brat as in many portrayals) is fantastic. Unabridged, as another reviewer noted, and digitally remastered, this recording is the best I've come across so far. Highly recommended!
6 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Robert Stephens chews scenery magnificently 18 janvier 1999
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Cassette
This is a terrific version of Shakespeare's play, starring Robert Stephens as the wicked King Richard in a deliciously "over the top" performance. Audio book lovers should take heed: this is the *unabridged* play, on three cassettes and clocking in at approximately four hours! And indeed some of the more formal lamentation scenes do tend to grow tiresome (but that is a feature of the play and not the performers' fault); however, the vitality of the Richard scenes amply outweighs this. The supporting cast, including Glenda Jackson, Dame Peggy Ashcroft, and Cyril Cusack, is uniformly excellent, but top honors must go to Stephens. The recorded sound (digitally remastered from a 1967 recording) is very good. Highly recommended.
5 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 THe most comprehensive and reliable presentation of this great play for our age, until the Norton soon comes out 11 octobre 2008
Par C. Scanlon - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
King Richard III is a play we must most carefully read today in our present crises, as we wander without ethics, without morality, without mercy, without grace. We have here the epitome of the Machiavellian politician, for whom no crime is too great to achieve total earthly power, for whom the ends justify the means. Such means are now accepted as part of the game in our national political discourse.

And so we must read and meditate this great and early play, which is listed amongst Will's Histories (as the King Henry IV (Arden Shakespeare Second), etc.) rather than Tragedies (King Lear (Arden Shakespeare), and we read it best in this authoritative edition with its nearly two hundred closely typed page introduction by Antony Hammond, associated as well with the Richard III: Playgoer's Edition (Arden Shakespeare Playgoer's Edition).

His introduction begins with a lengthy and detailed textual criticism. Rather early in this academic and authoritative exercise, as he pauses to catch his second wind, Hammond in fact writes: "After this long and somewhat scholastic study of how many compositors can dance on the tail of a thin-space, we may survey the remaining quartos much more succinctly (p. 30)." Truth be told, he is only warming up. Not only do we find in his learned and lengthy introduction a most careful combing of all nits in the various Quarto (over six) and Folio editions, with reasons established over the years for preferring one reading over another, but we also find an extensive discussion of several aspects of the play itself, including its Theology.

One cannot imagine a more thorough and profound treatment of all aspects of the play, and then we have the play itself, in the most authoritative version possible, including of course as ever with Arden, the variorum, including later editors such as Capell and Theobald, and footnotes for each page. I find Hammond takes a refreshingly modern dialect in these notes, which keeps them fresh yet brief, concise, to the point, profound and helpful. Lengthier and brilliant notes are included in Appendix II.

Appendices follow presenting the lengthier series of lines included exclusively in the first Quarto or Folio but omitted from the other. Hammond does wisely include within the play itself the Quarto's interesting and telling clock metaphor in Act IV, and the Folio's lengthy speech by Richard after Act IV scene iv line 288 in his fascinating interview with Elizabeth.

The Introduction includes a lengthy discussion of sources; the third appendix presents these sources nearly in their entirety, including the various references and tangential material in The Mirror for Magistrates, and Halls' Union with Hall's redaction of Saint Thomas More's History of King Richard III, also available separately as The History of King Richard III and Selections from the English and Latin Poems (Selected Works of St. Thomas More Series) among others.

In short this book, first published in 1981, serves as a substantial and comprehensive presentation of this play for the most serious student. Fortunately the excellent and traditional Norton Critical Editions will soon publish its own study of King Richard III which is already available for pre-order here on amazon.com.

By reading the play itself here in its most reliable text we realize how much was lost and gained in Ian McLellan's Richard III, and how much was also lost in Sir Laurence Olivier's Richard III (The Classic Collection). We may also find interesting a viewing of Al Pacino's usual passionate efforts in Pacino: An Actor's Vision (Chinese Coffee / Looking for Richard / The Local Stigmatic).

In short, this Arden edition not only presents very reliably every aspect of the play itself, but may serve as a portal to further discovery, further reading and further study. The six pages of tiny font entitled Abbreviations and References serves as a wholesome bibliography for any student drawn to learn more about this play, although the front pages of our newspapers may also serve for further reflection. Hammond in particular indicates the psychological breakdown of King Richard by the end of the play.

In intriguing study referenced is The Woman's Part: Feminist Criticism of Shakespeare which should provide each of us substantial food for thought.
7 internautes sur 9 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 "Elven marked abortive rooting hog" 11 août 1999
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Poche
Shakespeare portrays King Richard III as a hunchbacked thoroughly evil man. While based upon the historical Richard III, the play is a dramatization. Although classed as a history, remember that Shakespeare's histories aren't historically accurate biographies. Richard is a power-hungry brother of a king who murders, schemes, marries, and plots to usurp the throne from rightful heirs. Richard gets his due when he meets Henry Tudor on the field of battle and the reign of the Yorkist kings comes to an end. Written under the rule of a Tudor monarch (Elizabeth I), the play paints the brutal Richard in an especially unfavorable light. After all, the rise of the Tudors depended upon the death of Richard III. The treatment of women in the play has been criticized, especially the speed under which Anne accepts Richard III -- with her dead father in law in the scene, no less. The play compresses 14 years or so of real history into 5 acts. It is hard to go wrong with Shakespeare. A good but dark read.
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