Commencez à lire The Land of Painted Caves (with Bonus Content) sur votre Kindle dans moins d'une minute. Vous n'avez pas encore de Kindle ? Achetez-le ici Ou commencez à lire dès maintenant avec l'une de nos applications de lecture Kindle gratuites.

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

 
 
 

Essai gratuit

Découvrez gratuitement un extrait de ce titre

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Tout le monde peut lire les livres Kindle, même sans un appareil Kindle, grâce à l'appli Kindle GRATUITE pour les smartphones, les tablettes et les ordinateurs.
The Land of Painted Caves (with Bonus Content): Earth's Children, Book Six
 
Agrandissez cette image
 

The Land of Painted Caves (with Bonus Content): Earth's Children, Book Six [Format Kindle]

Jean M. Auel
3.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (10 commentaires client)

Prix conseillé : EUR 6,78 De quoi s'agit-il ?
Prix éditeur - format imprimé : EUR 7,00
Prix Kindle : EUR 4,75 TTC & envoi gratuit via réseau sans fil par Amazon Whispernet
Économisez : EUR 2,25 (32%)

-40%, -50%, -60%... Découvrez les Soldes Amazon jusqu'au 5 août 2014 inclus. Profitez-en !






Descriptions du produit

Extrait

1

The band of travelers walked along the path between the clear sparkling water of Grass River and the ­black-­streaked white limestone cliff, following the trail that paralleled the right bank. They went single file around the bend where the stone wall jutted out closer to the water’s edge. Ahead a smaller path split off at an angle ­toward the crossing place, where the flowing water spread out and became shallower, bubbling around exposed rocks.

Before they reached the fork in the trail a young woman near the front suddenly stopped, her eyes opening wide as she stood perfectly still, staring ahead. She pointed with her chin, not wanting to move. “Look! Over there!” she said in a hissing whisper of fear. “Lions!”

Joharran, the leader, lifted his arm, signaling the band to a halt. Just beyond the place where the trail diverged, they now saw ­pale-­tawny cave lions moving around in the grass. The grass was such effective camouflage, however, that they might not have noticed them until they were much closer, if it ­hadn’t been for the sharp eyes of Thefona. The young woman from the Third Cave had exceptionally good vision, and though she was quite young, she was noted for her ability to see far and well. Her innate talent had been recognized early and they had begun training her when she was a small girl; she was their best lookout.

Near the back of the group, walking in front of three horses, Ayla and Jondalar looked up to see what was causing the delay. “I wonder why we’ve stopped,” Jondalar said, a familiar frown of worry wrinkling his forehead.

Ayla observed the leader and the people around him closely, and instinctively moved her hand to shield the warm bundle that she carried in the soft leather blanket tied to her chest. Jonayla had recently nursed and was sleeping, but moved slightly at her mother’s touch. Ayla had an uncanny ability to interpret meaning from body language, learned young when she lived with the Clan. She knew Joharran was alarmed and Thefona was frightened.

Ayla, too, had extraordinarily sharp vision. She could also pick up sounds above the range of normal hearing and feel the deep tones of those that were below. Her sense of smell and taste were also keen, but she had never compared herself with anyone, and ­didn’t realize how extraordinary her perceptions were. She was born with heightened acuity in all her senses, which no doubt contributed to her survival after losing her parents and everything she knew at five years. Her only training had come from herself. She had developed her natural abilities during the years she studied animals, chiefly carnivores, when she was teaching herself to hunt.

In the stillness, she discerned the faint but familiar rumblings of lions, detected their distinctive scent on a slight breeze, and noticed that several people in front of the group were gazing ahead. When she looked, she saw something move. Suddenly the cats hidden by the grass seemed to jump into clear focus. She could make out two young and three or four adult cave lions. As she started moving forward, she reached with one hand for her ­spear-­thrower, fastened to a carrying loop on her belt, and with the other for a spear from the holder hanging on her back.

“Where are you going?” Jondalar asked.

She stopped. “There are lions up ahead just beyond the split in the trail,” she said under her breath.

Jondalar turned to look, and noticed movement that he interpreted as lions now that he knew what to look for. He reached for his weapons as well. “You should stay here with Jonayla. I’ll go.”

Ayla glanced down at her sleeping baby, then looked up at him. “You’re good with the ­spear-­thrower, Jondalar, but there are at least two cubs and three grown lions, probably more. If the lions think the cubs are in danger and decide to attack, you’ll need help, someone to back you up, and you know I’m better than anyone, except you.”

His brow furrowed again as he paused to think, looking at her. Then he nodded. “All right . . . but stay behind me.” He detected movement out of the corner of his eye and glanced back. “What about the horses?”

“They know lions are near. Look at them,” Ayla said.

Jondalar looked. All three horses, including the new young filly, were staring ahead, obviously aware of the huge felines. Jondalar frowned again. “Will they be all right? Especially little Gray?”

“They know to stay out of the way of those lions, but I don’t see Wolf,” Ayla said. “I’d better whistle for him.”

“You don’t have to,” Jondalar said, pointing in a different direction. “He must sense something, too. Look at him coming.”

Ayla turned and saw a wolf racing ­toward her. The canine was a magnificent animal, larger than most, but an injury from a fight with other wolves that left him with a bent ear gave him a rakish look. She made the special signal that she used when they hunted together. He knew it meant to stay near and pay close attention to her. They ducked around people as they hurried ­toward the front, trying not to cause any undo commotion, and to remain as inconspicuous as possible.

“I’m glad you’re here,” Joharran said softly when he saw his brother and Ayla with the wolf quietly appear with their ­spear-­throwers in hand.

“Do you know how many there are?” Ayla asked.

“More than I thought,” Thefona said, trying to seem calm and not let her fear show. “When I first saw them, I thought there were maybe three or four, but they are moving around in the grass, and now I think there may be ten or more. It’s a big pride.”

“And they are feeling confident,” Joharran said.

“How do you know that?” Thefona asked.

“They’re ignoring us.”

Jondalar knew his mate was very familiar with the huge felines. “Ayla knows cave lions,” he said. “Perhaps we should ask her what she thinks.” Joharran nodded in her direction, asking the question silently.

“Joharran is right. They know we’re here. And they know how many they are and how many we are,” Ayla said, then added, “They may see us as something like a herd of horses or aurochs and think they may be able to single out a weak one. I think they are new to this region.”

“What makes you think so?” Joharran said. He was always surprised at Ayla’s wealth of knowledge of ­four-­legged hunters, but for some reason it was also at times like this that he noticed her unusual accent more.

“They don’t know us, that’s why they’re so confident,” Ayla continued. “If they were a resident pride that lived around people and had been chased or hunted a few times, I don’t think they would be so unconcerned.”

“Well, maybe we should give them something to be concerned about,” Jondalar said.

Joharran’s brow wrinkled in a way that was so much like his taller though younger brother’s, it made Ayla want to smile, but it usually showed at a time when smiling would be inappropriate. “Perhaps it would be wiser just to avoid them,” the ­dark-­haired leader said.

“I don’t think so,” Ayla said, bowing her head and looking down. It was still difficult for her to disagree with a man in public, especially a leader. Though she knew it was perfectly acceptable among the Zelandonii—after all, some leaders were women, including, at one time, Joharran and Jondalar’s mother—such behavior from a woman would not have been tolerated in the Clan, the ones who raised her.

“Why not?” Joharran asked, his frown turning into a scowl.

“Those lions are resting too close to the home of the Third Cave,” Ayla said quietly. “There will always be lions around, but if they are comfortable here, they might think of it as a place to return when they want to rest, and would see any people who come near as prey, especially children or elders. They could be a danger to the people who live at Two Rivers Rock, and the other nearby Caves, including the Ninth.”

Joharran took a deep breath, then looked at his ­fair-­haired brother. “Your mate is right, and you as well, Jondalar. Perhaps now is the time to let those lions know they are not welcome to settle down so close to our homes.”

“This would be a good time to use ­spear-­throwers so we can hunt from a safer distance. Several hunters here have been practicing,” Jondalar said. It was for just this sort of thing that he had wanted to come home and show everyone the weapon he had developed. “We may not even have to kill one, just injure a couple to teach them to stay away.”

“Jondalar,” Ayla said, softly. Now she was getting ready to differ with him, or at least to make a point that he should consider. She looked down again, then raised her eyes and looked directly at him. She ­wasn’t afraid to speak her mind to him, but she wanted to be respectful. “It’s true that a ­spear-­thrower is a very good weapon. With it, a spear can be thrown from a much greater distance than one thrown by hand, and that makes it safer. But safer is not safe. A wounded animal is unpredictable. And one with the strength and speed of a cave lion, hurt and wild with pain, could do anything. If you decide to use these weapons against those lions, they should not be used to injure, but to kill.”

“She’s right, Jondalar,” Joharran said.

Jondalar frowned at his brother, then grinned sheepishly. “Yes she is, but, as dangerous as they a...

Revue de presse

Jean Auel's amazing, ground-breaking series reaches a stunning conclusion. . . . . If you ever wondered what it was like for the first reasoning humans, this is the perfect way to learn. It's as though Auel has opened up a time portal, travelled with and lived with actual human beings as they begin their journey towards the people we are today. Moving and majestic, this story sweeps all before it and encompasses everything we know about our ancestors as they trek through central Europe and set up home in the caves there. All life is here in all its glory, the loves, the jealousy, the rivalry, the medicines . . . A compelling historical drama with every modern trait of the human being, but set in the days when the world was young. Magnificent, and a privilege to be able to read it. You must read this. (Books Monthly)

She deftly creates a whole world, giving a sense of the origins of class, ethnic and cultural differences that alternately divide and fascinate us today. Among modern epic spinners, Auel has few peers. (Kirkus Reviews)

Incredibly poignant and relevant to today (Sun 4 stars)

She does have a most extraordinary talent for recreating lost worlds (Kate Saunders, Books Quarterly)

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 2758 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 850 pages
  • Pagination - ISBN de l'édition imprimée de référence : 0553289438
  • Editeur : Bantam (29 mars 2011)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B003O2SQO8
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 3.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (10 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°52.067 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
  •  Souhaitez-vous faire modifier les images ?


En savoir plus sur l'auteur

En 1977, alors âgée de quarante ans, l'Américaine Jean Auel décide de quitter son emploi, un poste à responsabilité dans une entreprise d'électronique. En attendant d'obtenir un travail plus stimulant, cette mère de cinq enfants se met à écrire une nouvelle consacrée à une femme de la préhistoire. Ainsi naît Ayla, l'héroïne des « Enfants de la Terre », une formidable saga préhistorique qui s'est à ce jour vendue à plus de 45 millions d'exemplaires à travers le monde.

Commentaires en ligne 

Commentaires client les plus utiles
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
1.0 étoiles sur 5 Dernier de la série??? 21 juin 2011
Format:Relié
J'ai lu avec beaucoup de passion les premiers livres de la série et ai palpité avec les aventures de Ayla.
Les numéros 4 et 5 font un peu remplissage et sont beaucoup plus laborieux et ennuyeux meme dans l'écriture
avec énormémént de rappels fastidieux des évènements et épisodes précedent.
J 'espère que ce sont les derniers et que Mme Auel ne remettra pas le couvert!!
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
1.0 étoiles sur 5 De loin le moins bon tome de la serie 29 mars 2014
Format:Poche|Achat vérifié
Très déçu. Arrêtez-vous au tome précédent pour rester sur une bonne impression !
J'ai trouvé le déroulé de l'histoire lent, avec peu d'action, et l'histoire elle-même peu engageante. Clairement pas a la hauteur des épisodes précédents a mon avis.
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
2.0 étoiles sur 5 Disappointment! 1 février 2013
Format:Poche|Achat vérifié
This 828 page book could easily be reduced to 400 if the repetitions were deleted. It's especially tough going since most of the action happens in the last 200 pages... Good for a beach book, but it's the kind you wouldn't mind leaving behind for the next person.
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
3.0 étoiles sur 5 Dernier volume un peu décevant 20 janvier 2013
Format:Poche|Achat vérifié
Très long sur les 200 premières pages. Ce dernier volume fait un peu roman fleuve. Heureusement les personnages sauvent le livre. Livre moyen.
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
5.0 étoiles sur 5 dépaysant 19 octobre 2012
Par Clara
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
je suis une grande fan de cette série depuis 5 ans! un vrai bijoux qui mèle fait scientifiques (car l'auteur a fait de grandes recherche avant de commencer à écrire)à un peu de romance!
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
Vous voulez voir plus de commentaires sur cet article ?
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ?   Dites-le-nous

Passages les plus surlignés

 (Qu'est-ce que c'est ?)
&quote;
Selfishness, cheating, and failing to assist someone in need were considered crimes, and the society found ways to punish such criminals, but penalties were often subtle and inventive. &quote;
Marqué par 38 utilisateurs Kindle
&quote;
Chamomile is relaxing and if you take it at night, it can help you to fall asleep. Lemon balm is calming, especially if you feel nervous and stressful. It will even relieve the stomach upset that sometimes comes with stress and it will help you sleep. It has a pleasant taste that is good with chamomile. Linden helps with headaches, especially when you feel tight and tense, and adds a little sweetening. &quote;
Marqué par 30 utilisateurs Kindle
&quote;
Thefona. The young woman from the Third Cave had exceptionally good vision, &quote;
Marqué par 21 utilisateurs Kindle

Discussions entre clients

Le forum concernant ce produit
Discussion Réponses Message le plus récent
Pas de discussions pour l'instant

Posez des questions, partagez votre opinion, gagnez en compréhension
Démarrer une nouvelle discussion
Thème:
Première publication:
Aller s'identifier
 

Rechercher parmi les discussions des clients
Rechercher dans toutes les discussions Amazon
   



Rechercher des articles similaires par rubrique