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Learning Java If you're new to Java, the fourth edition of this bestselling guide provides an example-driven introduction to the latest language features and APIs in Java 6 and 7. Advanced Java developers will be able to take a deep dive into areas such as concurrency and JVM enhancements. Full description


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5 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Java for established programmers 8 août 2013
Par G. van Staden - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Format Kindle
This book is most suited to those who know some Java but want to progress their knowledge to its broader use or those moving to Java from another language. I don't think it's a good book for new programmers. The first few examples involve Swing which means a lot of fundamental concepts are assumed. Types, event handling, conditionals, control of flow and classes are only covered after an entire chapter of building a Swing application. The core language, utilities, Swing, Web Programming, Web Service Programming and XML are the main topics. Once again having XML processing after Web Services is not an ideal topic order. The constant comparisons with C++ are annoying and detract from focusing on learning Java. The appendix insert on Eclipse was a good idea but it is too lacking for those who are new to the IDE and too basic for those familiar with it. As for Appendix B, I don't understand why this was included. There is enough information for the reader to walk away well aware of the capabilities and philosophies of Java. To get a coherent understanding of Java from this, you will have to read it a few times and be prepared to bounce around the various chapters.
8 internautes sur 9 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Excellent reference but not for beginners 28 juin 2013
Par tjain - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
Learning Java (Fourth Edition) is book for Java practitioner as reference book. This covers lot of topics.

This is an excellent book for someone who knows basics of programming. This book is not beginners. This book lacks examples and exercises which may disappoint few people.

Book has 24 chapters covering almost all of basic Java. The chapter one talks about historical aspects. Second chapter is brief introduction of java but it assumes that reader is aware of programming, OOP, threading etc which is difficult for any beginner.
2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Not for beginners...even somewhat experienced beginners. 15 février 2014
Par NFB - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
I wish I'd listened to the reviewers who claimed that this was a great resource for experienced developers or those with some exposure to Java already, but not necessarily the introduction to the language that it might seem to be.

I am not an absolute novice programmer - I've had an introductory programming course, and I have several years of experience writing, using and maintaining software of varying complexity, but mostly in scripting languages. Having learned most of my programming skills on the fly, I knew that I had many substantial gaps in my knowledge that I was hoping to address while teaching myself Java. I did not expect to be able to dive right in without effort, but I did think I was ready for something a little more advanced than your standard first level, "here's how you write a for loop in Java," programming course. I still think that, but I also believe that this book is not what might come next for someone with my background.

In the first place, I ran into the same issues as everyone else with Chapter 2, the IDE and attempting to grab the examples from the O'Reilly website. I think those issues are inexcusable, and I do not understand why they have not been addressed. Some poking around on the O'Reilly user forum did finally turn up a fix (from another user - the author's posts were not helpful) that worked for me, but ultimately I found it most helpful to simply regenerate the examples myself by hand.

That gripe addressed, I proceeded fairly rapidly until Chapter 5, at which point my progress stalled. For someone totally new to the language, it's simply too much detail without some hands-on examples. By the end of the chapter I'd largely lost all grasp of content from the middle. I appreciate that for someone with a background in OOP, it's probably highly useful. And I expect that I will turn to this book as a reference, but for now, I think I will have to find another resource to actually start programming in Java.
5 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
"Learning Java: Fourth Edition" by Niemeyer/Leuck (O'Reilly) 20 août 2013
Par bibliomanic - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
Let me begin by saying I don't feel this books is appropriate for anyone brand new to the Java programming language. A few months back I recommended Michael Ernest's Java SE 7 Programming Essentials as the quintessential guide for beginners in Java programming. And it is. But once you've gone through that book, you should head straight to Learning Java by Patrick Niemeyer and Daniel Leuck. In my assessment, this is one of the best and most authoritative editions of Java 7 ever put out by O'Reilly. From the introduction, the authors demonstrate their knowledge of not only the history of Java but how it has matured and how developers today should approach using it.

Interestingly, this is the first Java title in awhile I've seen that jumps into the language but simultaneously offers an up-front tutorial of the Eclipse integrated development environment, arguably one of the most popular IDE's in use for Java programming today. In fact, the first three chapters gives an overview of the language, demonstrates a first application and then describes how to implement the sample code inside Eclipse. (There's also an Appendix with more thorough coverage on Eclipse).

The next few chapters takes a sweeping look at Java on a number of levels. First, the authors give just the right amount of attention to Java types, and explain object-oriented program and the relationships between objects. This includes coverage on properties, fields, methods and constructors. It wraps up with a look at enumerations and generics. By the time you reach 250 pages, you've been taken on a grand tour of the language and given a solid grounding in its practical use.

Rather than dive deep at that point into the language, I was surprised to find the authors turn to a discussion on threading! I found this a little bit of an unusual choice for this juncture in the book (particularly since it followed on with a discussion of the String object), but it was no less enjoyable and in some regards made sense.

The book then takes a look at I/O and networking, followed by a natural segue to web programming and web services (yay)! This was undoubtedly a highlight for me in the book from just the sheer amount of sample code and practical advice.

Chapters 16-19 provided more than 150 pages on the topic of Swing and Layout managers, something that is woefully lacking in other books. Two more chapters finally wrap the UI aspects with discussions of the APIs for graphics rendering and drawing.

I felt the text concluded with a bit of oddity. For example, there's a chapter on Applets that I would've expected to come earlier, perhaps coupled with the web development pieces. There's an excellent overview into the serialization, reflection and design of JavaBeans, but it lacked a more comprehensive look I felt it deserved. The last chapter comprised about 50 pages on XML.

As with any book of this size, organization is a critical factor and probably one of the most difficult for technical editors and writers. Overall I think O'Reilly's team did a fine job with this fourth edition. I feel the chapter on XML might have been better served following the discussion on I/O since there are parallels. Finally, I was utterly surprised not to find any significant coverage of databases other than in relatively short or contrived examples. I think a chapter on this would've made the text better, although at what cost to the other content would be called into question.

At the end of the day I would rate this a solid 4/5 stars by O'Reilly's rating criteria. I recommend this book on its many good merits of topic coverage, and on the competence and expertise clearly demonstrated by its authors.

* Disclaimer: The e-book version of this book was given to me by a representative of the publisher in exchange for a review. However, all opinions and observations regarding the text are my own, and based on my experience as a professional developer.
Searching for something better. 10 septembre 2014
Par BrianD - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
I initially tried to learn some OOP with Java, using this book. I gave up. I taught myself C some years ago so decided to give C++ a try instead of the Java. I bought C++ Primer Plus by Stephen Prata. It was a revelation, very well written. I decide to go back and read the first few chapters of Learning Java again just to confirm my opinion. It was just not a very good book to learn from. For example it jumped into some fairly advance syntax and concepts in the second chapter with little explanation.

I may go back and try Java again, with a better book.
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