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Linux in a Nutshell [Format Kindle]

Ellen Siever , Stephen Figgins , Robert Love , Arnold Robbins

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Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

Everything you need to know about Linux is in this book. Written by Stephen Figgins, Ellen Siever, Robert Love, and Arnold Robbins -- people with years of active participation in the Linux community -- Linux in a Nutshell, Sixth Edition, thoroughly covers programming tools, system and network administration tools, the shell, editors, and LILO and GRUB boot loaders.

This updated edition offers a tighter focus on Linux system essentials, as well as more coverage of new capabilities such as virtualization, wireless network management, and revision control with git. It also highlights the most important options for using the vast number of Linux commands. You'll find many helpful new tips and techniques in this reference, whether you're new to this operating system or have been using it for years.

  • Get the Linux commands for system administration and network management
  • Use hundreds of the most important shell commands available on Linux
  • Understand the Bash shell command-line interpreter
  • Search and process text with regular expressions
  • Manage your servers via virtualization with Xen and VMware
  • Use the Emacs text editor and development environment, as well as the vi, ex, and vim text-manipulation tools
  • Process text files with the sed editor and the gawk programming language
  • Manage source code with Subversion and git

Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 2238 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 944 pages
  • Utilisation simultanée de l'appareil : Illimité
  • Editeur : O'Reilly Media; Édition : 6 (19 septembre 2009)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B0093T2G3I
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
  • X-Ray :
  • Word Wise: Non activé
  • Composition améliorée: Non activé
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: n°350.599 dans la Boutique Kindle (Voir le Top 100 dans la Boutique Kindle)
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Amazon.com: 4.5 étoiles sur 5  30 commentaires
11 internautes sur 11 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Essential Linux Text 9 septembre 2011
Par Steven Summers - Publié sur Amazon.com
This book is the basis of my career. I was working doing phone support. I was the bridge between the customers and the linux engineers running the hosted application. As I became interested in the work the engineers were doing and showed a little aptitude someone recommended this book. I read it cover to cover while commuting on the train and now I have 11 years experience as a Linux/Unix engineer. On a daily basis I draw on knowledge that I was originally exposed to in this text.

What does it provide?

This text is not "linux for dummies." It is a complete overview of command line Linux administration intended for administrators. I knew nothing about Linux before I read it. After reading I was able to make a career change to become a full time administrator. It basically covers all of the major administration activities and gives a good overview of the commands necessary to accomplish these tasks. It also goes into some of the theory behind good administration without going to deep or getting pedantic.

If you are considering learning command line linux or just tinkering around and need a basis so you know what to google for this is a great starting point.

I now provide a copy of this book to any new engineers that I train. I cannot recommend it highly enough.
7 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 I wore out my copy of an earlier edition. This one is better. 25 octobre 2009
Par M. Helmke - Publié sur Amazon.com
Years ago I purchased a copy of Linux in a Nutshell, fourth edition. That book has been well used and is looking a bit shabby. When O'Reilly offered me a free review copy of Linux in a Nutshell, sixth edition, I jumped at the chance. Some of the thoughts that follow will apply to either edition (as well as the not-reviewed fifth edition, which I don't have), but I will point out some of the more important or obvious updates to help others who also own older editions to determine whether the changes are sufficient to convince them to buy the new version.

This book is not intended as a tutorial, but rather as a quick reference. While the irony of titling a 900+ page book "... in a Nutshell" is not lost on me, like all of the books in O'Reilly's Nutshell series, this book is a fabulous resource for finding out the details of a specific command or concept rapidly.

Let me start with the foundation for my opinion that this book is one of the most useful and important books for anyone who uses Linux from the command line on a regular basis or wants to be able to or plans to do so. Any command you should desire to use is listed in chapter 3, with the command's syntax and options. This gives you one place to look that does not require an internet connection or the patience to scroll up and down reading man pages for commands. This is a book about Linux as it was originally conceived and intended: a powerful operating system based directly upon and consistent with the philosophy and design of Unix, but free for anyone to download, install, copy, modify, share and use.

This book is not about how to use Linux on the desktop, and in fact, the sixth edition does not cover the Linux desktop at all. What you do find are discussions, descriptions, and definitions of all of the main tools and tricks a person needs to get work accomplished using Linux as a platform--not the specific programming languages like C, Java or Python, but the underlying tools such as commands from the GNU project and BSD, editors like vi and emacs, using the bash shell, source code management using subversion and git (both new to this edition, replacing a discussion of CVS), and great introductions to Linux system and network administration. In addition, we have a wonderful new chapter on virtualization command line tools that covers all the main options such as KVM, Xen and VMware.

I am amazed that my description thus far has only scratched the surface of the book. I haven't yet mentioned the chapters covering sed and gawk, the discussion of software package management, the chapter detailing LILO and Grub boot loaders, or the lovely section on pattern matching which should save a lot of people a good amount of time.

My disappointments in the book are a bit niggly. While the book was written and tested using each of the main Linux distributions (Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora and SUSE), there have been a couple of updates to software covered in the book that were not available when the book went to press. Since I know how long it takes to write and prepare a manuscript for printing, it is kind of silly for me to want a book that was published in September 2009 to cover Windows 7 (although dual booting with earlier versions is covered), ext4, or Grub2, even if these are all current in late October 2009 (the latter two being included in Ubuntu 9.10).

The positives are that this is a clear, well written and edited (disclosure: I worked with one of the editors, Andy Oram, on VMware Cookbook), and filled with valuable information with an easy to use index and table of contents with a tighter than previous focus on the internal bits of Linux without the earlier distractions of trying to mention GNOME and KDE or a wider variety of shell options while only covering each with too little detail to be useful. This edition expands the content on the things it does cover to a very useful level of detail while making the hard decision of what to omit to keep the book within a bindable number of pages.

In any edition, this book has a permanent place on my shelf for reference. If you own an older version, the decision to buy the latest edition will depend on whether you want or need the absolute latest info on specific commands (this stuff doesn't change often, but it does change) and whether you are interested in the new or expanded material covered in this edition as outlined above. If you never use the command line in Linux, the book might not interest you. Otherwise, I can't imagine using Linux without having a copy nearby.

Disclosures: I bought an earlier edition, but was given the sixth edition free by O'Reilly as a review copy, I write for O'Reilly, and I have worked with one of the editors who also worked on this book.
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 My #1 pick for Linux 4 juin 2014
Par Alex Alexzander - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
I have been asked quite a few times to recommend a book for the novice to learn Linux. This book is it. Effectively half the book is devoted to every command that typically comes standard on distributions. If you just look through those, say one or two commands a day and read the options you'll start to see what kind of capabilities Linux affords you.

Anyone looking to understand the basics will need to know package management and this gives you yum and apt-get and rpm and dpkg so you get perspective on both the Redhat and the Debian package management methods.

The bash shell, pattern matching vim (my favorite) and emacs basics to get you started. This book almost 1,000 pages and none of it wasted with useless info. Browse a couple commands a day and read the rest of the book cover to cover. You'll be rock'n Linux like a pro!
12 internautes sur 16 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
2.0 étoiles sur 5 Excellent book if you have low standards 8 août 2011
Par D. R. Martz - Publié sur Amazon.com
While the book has some utility as a reference, it is not well organized. Frequently a chapter or topic starts out in the worst possible way, which is to fog things up by discussing exception cases before an introduction to the topic. Then you will frequently see examples using command line characters that have not yet been explained, followed by tables exhaustively listing the various command line characters and including truncated, frequently ambiguous explanations. There are also many cases of circular explanations, where command x is defined as being like command y, except it is case sensitive, or it uses regex rules, or what have you. But when you go to command y, you find a poor explanation, so you wind up with very very clear understanding that command x is a partially explained variant of a vaguely defined command. This book is not an expeditious way to learn, nor is it particularly effective as a quick reference. You would be better off with half as much information and twice as much effort to convey it.
2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 An extensive reference for any serious computer collection 18 janvier 2010
Par Midwest Book Review - Publié sur Amazon.com
Libraries strong in system administration or Linux programming will find LINUX IN A NUTSHELL to be a powerful updated edition offering a focus of Linux options and all the latest new options for applying Linux commands. From learning hundreds of shell commands and understanding the Bash shell interpreter to processing text with expressions and using administrative tools, LINUX IN A NUTSHELL provides an extensive reference for any serious computer collection.
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