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52 Little Lessons from Les Miserables (English Edition)
 
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52 Little Lessons from Les Miserables (English Edition) [Format Kindle]

Bob Welch

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Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

Gold Medallion Award-winner Bob Welch crafts 52 nuggets of Bible-based wisdom from one of the most popular novels, musicals, and films of all time: Les Misérables.

In 52 Little Lessons from Les Misérables, Bob Welch walks readers through Hugo’s masterpiece, extracting dozens of uniquely spiritual reflections from this enduring portrait of poverty, social injustice, mercy, and redemption. Welch reminds us that Jean Valjean’s life provides the truest example of why real love is found in the grittiest places, and that hearts are made whole beneath the crush of mercy. Most important, though, Welch keeps returning to the intersections of faith and reality throughout Hugo’s writing—those places where mercy becomes an inroad to the heart, and where love is only truly received when it is given without condition.

Discover again why life’s purpose is found not in attending to personal needs and desires, but in responding to the hearts of others.

 


Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 1008 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 205 pages
  • Pagination - ISBN de l'édition imprimée de référence : 1400206669
  • Editeur : Thomas Nelson (7 octobre 2014)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B00KQ2G7T0
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
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  • Word Wise: Non activé
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Amazon.com: 4.7 étoiles sur 5  12 commentaires
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Valuable Lessons in 52 Delightful Bits 23 octobre 2014
Par Dr Conrade Yap - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
The musical has been seen by more than 65 million people in over 42 countries. Written by Victor Hugo in 1862, it continues to fascinate and enthrall audiences the world over. In 2012, it even won a Golden Globe award for best picture. The question, is there something more than simply a show? Are there important lessons to learn from as far as lay people are concerned? Are the lessons in the 19th Century story still relevant for today? Welch gives an emphatic YES! Fifty Two of them.

For Les Miserables is not simply a brilliant play that entertains. It is also a story that is big on spiritual themes, life struggles, and according to author, speaker, and adjunct professor of journalism at Eugene's University of Oregon, it contains "52 little lessons" that we can all learn from. What makes the writing of this book interesting and challenging is to be able to select only 52 out of a very complex tale of betrayal, mystery, joy, forgiveness, despondency, suffering, political and social reforms, and many others. For us as readers, we can enjoy the fruits of the author's labour, with the many stories of the characters, the places, the plots, the history and many other interesting settings. Most of the lessons are spiritually inclined because the author feels that the novel is spiritual in nature.

Readers will notice several significant themes. Right from the start, an important key to understanding the story is to know the background and contexts. Things happen with a reason. We learn about the generosity and humility of bishop Myriel, an upright man who gives up personal comfort for the benefit of others, defends the poor, and loves serving people. His quiet and servant lifestyle contrasts with those who are famous, pompous, and richly influential who hardly lifted a finger to help the vulnerable. Jean Valjean's patient knocking on doors to ask for help is another example of how Matthew 7:7-8 can be practiced. We learn about love that is active, not passive. Other spiritual lessons include:

- Learning to see others as God sees people
- How crisis tests our character and how grace can change us
- The irony of strengths becoming weaknesses
- That children need to be allowed to be children. Don't impose adult like expectations on them.
- What good is faith if it does not touch others?
- Humility and humanity
- ...

Just looking at the lessons drawn from the musical, I believe that there are more than 52 lessons in this really intriguing novel. I appreciate the concise summaries in each chapter and the "list of characters" to help jiggle our memories about the novel and play. Perhaps, one of the best ways to appreciate Bob Welch's book is to watch Les Miserables again. Then read the book and see the characters and the life lessons come alive in more ways than one.

Rating: 4.5 stars of 5.

conrade
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers booklookbloggers.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 I've loved Les Misérables since I first read it in high ... 15 octobre 2014
Par Julius L McCarter - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
I've loved Les Misérables since I first read it in high school. Hugo's vivid portrayal of Jean Valjean's growth into kindness is perhaps one of the greatest in all literature. Hugo has given us a classic that stood the tests of time.

And while I love the book, my wife is drawn to the play, and more recently the 2012 movie. But whether it's the book, the play or the movie, Les Misérables captivates hearts and minds for a reason.

So I was doubly excited to read Bob Welch's 52 Little Lessons from Les Misérables. Welch's little book supplements that classic in so many ways. And he offers us a little gem that will grace bookshelves.

Unlike Hugo's writing, Welch offers brief devotionals on the story that can be read in a single sitting -- I know I did. But it also works as a devotional that has weekly readings for a full year. Either way, these short chapters are filled with a spiritual wisdom that Christans need to hear. That wisdom will have readers digging deeper into Hugo's writing, mining practical ideas that often go unnoticed. And there are questions at the end that make this book an excellent resource for Sunday School classes and small discipleship groups.

Hugo's Les Misérables is a theological classic in its own right. And now Walch's book will open it up to new generations.

But, lector caveat -- reader, beware: Welch's little book will have you reaching for the soundtrack and watching your DVD copies and even (gasp!) rereading Hugo's own words. Because Welch is so great a guide that it won't do just to take the little tours. That's the sign of a spiritual classic in its own right.

I couldn't recommend 52 Little Lessons from Les Misérables more highly.

__________________
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A Thoughtful Little Book 22 novembre 2014
Par Nathan Albright - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
[Note: This book was provided free of charge by BookLook/Thomas Nelson Publishers in exchange for an honest review.]

I have a confession to make: I have never read Les Mis, nor seen the musical, nor watched the movie. I nearly bought the book as a college student at a bookstore, the Penguin unabridged version, but was rather daunted by the hefty length (over 1600 pages). I have it on my kindle as well (as it was free from Amazon at the time, and who am I to turn down free books?), but have not read it, again because the length is overwhelming. There is less excuse, save the absence of the right company, for me to have never watched the musical or seen the movie, but perhaps of one of the many fans of the movie that I know can help rectify that problem. So, I may be among the most painfully unqualified people around to read this book, given my nearly total unfamiliarity with the context. That said, the Oregon-based author (who makes a lot of comments about the Pacific Northwest and his life here) manages to bring a lot of wisdom and explain and distill Les Mis (combining the novel, musical, and movie, and examining them all as part of the same text) and make it a compelling read even for someone who is not at all familiar with the work. Well done.

As the title of the book indicates, the contents of this book examine 52 little lessons from Les Mis, and not only does the book quote Hugo as well as the lyrics of the songs of the musical and movie, but the book also examines the scriptural parallels to Hugo’s masterpiece, looks at Hugo’s complicated life and character, and looks at history as well as other books about Christian virtue. Certain authors like C.S. Lewis and Oswald Chambers are quoted often as well, to good effect, and this book manages to use the word ragamuffin enough to trigger comparisons to one of the least favorite books I have ever reviewed without falling prey to its excesses. Likewise, it possesses a great deal of skill and craft while also giving praise and glory to God and serving to benefit the work that it references. Whether a reader is familiar with Hugo’s epic novel, he or she will either appreciate it all the more for being able to relate it to contemporary religious and social and political concerns, or will likely be more interested in reading the book in the first place.

As is often the case, I found a great deal of this book to be personally relevant. The author comments about the importance of grace to those who have lived difficult lives (and indeed, we all have in some fashion), and points to the fact that ultimately our good conduct should spring not from conventional ‘religion’ but from a changed heart and spirit out of which pour love and concern. Over and over again the author praises Valjean for his sincerity and his concern, for his willingness to put himself in harm’s way, to avoid taking vengeance on those who have harmed him, and on his struggle to live an honorable life despite massive liabilities including a horrible personal background and tremendous degree of loneliness and isolation. There was much in this book, perhaps too much, that I could relate to, and given what I read that is likely to be the case with Les Misèrables as well. Yet, to quote Victor Hugo, “So long as ignorance and misery remains on earth, books like this cannot be useless.”
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Explore Les Misérables with spiritual lessons from the novel 16 novembre 2014
Par Canadianladybug - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
Once you have read and heard Les Misérables you can appreciate the story from Victor Hugo. I have read the book, seen the play at the theater and even watch the more recent movie. Since its publications more than 150 years ago, Les Misérables has been fashioned in theatrical productions, movies and many have written commentaries on it. This book is different in many ways as the author extracts unique spiritual reflections from the book and its portryal of poverty, social injustice, mercy, and redemption.

I find that the book is perfect for a weekly devotion. It will guide you in discovering why life’s purpose is found in responding to the hearts of others and not by attending your own personal needs. In each lesson the author highlights the spiritual themes that are woven inside Les Misérables. These themes, like anguish, mercy, suffering and forgiveness in the face of adversity, are presented using the individual plights of the bishop, Valjean, Fantine, Cosette, Javert, Marius and Éponine. You experience the transformation of Valjean, the bishop’s compassion, and the redemption that comes afterward in a different way while going through this little book.

To be honest, the more I read 52 Lessons from Les Misérables the more it stirs me to read the book again. In one of the lessons you read about the transformation of Monseigneur Charles François-Bienvenu Myriel (the bishop) and realize that Les Misérables has numerous pages about his past which I never realize or paid attention of. Reading the book of Bob Welch gives me a newfound interest in reading the popular book of Victor Hugo with a different thinking process that I had when I first read it in my teenage years. There are lessons to be gleaned through the pages of Les Misérables and the book by Bob Welch helps us to see them.

So why not bless the fan of Les Misérables in your life this Christmas so the book can allow him/her to explore the story through a different angle with spiritual lessons.
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Great Read 3 novembre 2014
Par Jalynn Patterson - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
About the Book:

Gold Medallion Award-winner Bob Welch crafts 52 nuggets of Bible-based wisdom from one of the most popular novels, musicals, and films of all time: "Les Miserables."

In "52 Little Lessons from Les Miserables," Bob Welch walks readers through Hugo's masterpiece, extracting dozens of uniquely spiritual reflections from this enduring portrait of poverty, social injustice, mercy, and redemption. Welch reminds us that Jean Valjean's life provides the truest example of why real love is found in the grittiest places, and that hearts are made whole beneath the crush of mercy. Most important, though, Welch keeps returning to the intersections of faith and reality throughout Hugo's writing--those places where mercy becomes an inroad to the heart, and where love is only truly received when it is given without condition.

Discover again why life's purpose is found not in attending to personal needs and desires, but in responding to the hearts of others.

About the Author:

Bob Welch is the author of seventeen books, including 52 Little Lessons from It's a Wonderful Life, an award-winning columnist, a speaker, and an adjunct professor of journalism at the University of Oregon in Eugene. His articles have been published in inspirational books, including the popular “Chicken Soup for the Soul” series.

My Review:

For those of you that enjoy Les Miserables the author Bob Welch has put together 52 lessons of Biblical wisdom. I have never really been interested in Hugo's masterpiece, so I actually received this book to review on a whim of sorts and was pleasantly surprised. So I decide I would read through the book for my readers and let you know the low down on this one. The author offers us 52 lessons related to the story and characters from Les Miserables and I believe my favorite was Lesson number 47 entitled Religion Isn't the Answer.

Here the author speaks of Hugo's speaking on Jean Valjean and his personality type and how it compared to that of Jesus. He notes that they were very similar in their thinking. Jean Valjean as well as our beloved Savior were not about the religion of things but about the human heart and this shines through in His words and deeds. Our Savior relies on our love for Him to teach us and to grow us. I enjoyed the authors writings and hope to read more in the future.

**Disclosure** This book was sent to me free of charge for my honest review from Book Look.
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