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Lolita (Anglais) Relié – 1 janvier 1982


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Extrait

1

Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to tap, at three, on the teeth. Lo. Lee. Ta.

She was Lo, plain Lo, in the morning, standing four feet ten in one sock. She was Lola in slacks. She was Dolly at school. She was Dolores on the dotted line. But in my arms she was always Lolita.

Did she have a precursor? She did, indeed she did. In point of fact, there might have been no Lolita at all had I not loved, one summer, a certain initial girl-child. In a princedom by the sea. Oh when? About as many years before Lolita was born as my age was that summer. You can always count on a murderer for a fancy prose style.

Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, exhibit number one is what the seraphs, the misinformed, simple, noble-winged seraphs, envied. Look at this tangle of thorns.

2

I was born in 1910, in Paris. My father was a gentle, easy-going person, a salad of racial genes: a Swiss citizen, of mixed French and Austrian descent, with a dash of the Danube in his veins. I am going to pass around in a minute some lovely, glossy-blue picture-postcards. He owned a luxurious hotel on the Riviera. His father and two grandfathers had sold wine, jewels and silk, respectively. At thirty he married an English girl, daughter of Jerome Dunn, the alpinist, and granddaughter of two Dorset parsons, experts in obscure subjects-paleopedology and Aeolian harps, respectively. My very photogenic mother died in a freak accident (picnic, lightning) when I was three, and, save for a pocket of warmth in the darkest past, nothing of her subsists within the hollows and dells of memory, over which, if you can still stand my style (I am writing under observation), the sun of my infancy had set: surely, you all know those redolent remnants of day suspended, with the midges, about some hedge in bloom or suddenly entered and traversed by the rambler, at the bottom of a hill, in the summer dusk; a furry warmth, golden midges.

My mother's elder sister, Sybil, whom a cousin of my father's had married and then neglected, served in my immediate family as a kind of unpaid governess and housekeeper. Somebody told me later that she had been in love with my father, and that he had lightheartedly taken advantage of it one rainy day and forgotten it by the time the weather cleared. I was extremely fond of her, despite the rigidity-the fatal rigidity-of some of her rules. Perhaps she wanted to make of me, in the fullness of time, a better widower than my father. Aunt Sybil had pink-rimmed azure eyes and a waxen complexion. She wrote poetry. She was poetically superstitious. She said she knew she would die soon after my sixteenth birthday, and did. Her husband, a great traveler in perfumes, spent most of his time in America, where eventually he founded a firm and acquired a bit of real estate.

I grew, a happy, healthy child in a bright world of illustrated books, clean sand, orange trees, friendly dogs, sea vistas and smiling faces. Around me the splendid Hotel Mirana revolved as a kind of private universe, a whitewashed cosmos within the blue greater one that blazed outside. From the aproned pot-scrubber to the flanneled potentate, everybody liked me, everybody petted me. Elderly American ladies leaning on their canes listed toward me like towers of Pisa. Ruined Russian princesses who could not pay my father, bought me expensive bonbons. He, mon cher petit papa, took me out boating and biking, taught me to swim and dive and water-ski, read to me Don Quixote and Les Mis?rables, and I adored and respected him and felt glad for him whenever I overheard the servants discuss his various lady-friends, beautiful and kind beings who made much of me and cooed and shed precious tears over my cheerful motherlessness.

I attended an English day school a few miles from home, and there I played rackets and fives, and got excellent marks, and was on perfect terms with schoolmates and teachers alike. The only definite sexual events that I can remember as having occurred before my thirteenth birthday (that is, before I first saw my little Annabel) were: a solemn, decorous and purely theoretical talk about pubertal surprises in the rose garden of the school with an American kid, the son of a then celebrated motion-picture actress whom he seldom saw in the three-dimensional world; and some interesting reactions on the part of my organism to certain photographs, pearl and umbra, with infinitely soft partings, in Pichon's sumptuous La Beaut? Humaine that I had filched from under a mountain of marble-bound Graphics in the hotel library. Later, in his delightful debonair manner, my father gave me all the information he thought I needed about sex; this was just before sending me, in the autumn of 1923, to a lyc?e in Lyon (where we were to spend three winters); but alas, in the summer of that year, he was touring Italy with Mme de R. and her daughter, and I had nobody to complain to, nobody to consult.

3

Annabel was, like the writer, of mixed parentage: half-English, half-Dutch, in her case. I remember her features far less distinctly today than I did a few years ago, before I knew Lolita. There are two kinds of visual memory: one when you skillfully recreate an image in the laboratory of your mind, with your eyes open (and then I see Annabel in such general terms as: "honey-colored skin," "thin arms," "brown bobbed hair," "long lashes," "big bright mouth"); and the other when you instantly evoke, with shut eyes, on the dark innerside of your eyelids, the objective, absolutely optical replica of a beloved face, a little ghost in natural colors (and this is how I see Lolita).

Let me therefore primly limit myself, in describing Annabel, to saying she was a lovely child a few months my junior. Her parents were old friends of my aunt's, and as stuffy as she. They had rented a villa not far from Hotel Mirana. Bald brown Mr. Leigh and fat, powdered Mrs. Leigh (born Vanessa van Ness). How I loathed them! At first, Annabel and I talked of peripheral affairs. She kept lifting handfuls of fine sand and letting it pour through her fingers. Our brains were turned the way those of intelligent European preadolescents were in our day and set, and I doubt if much individual genius should be assigned to our interest in the plurality of inhabited worlds, competitive tennis, infinity, solipsism and so on. The softness and fragility of baby animals caused us the same intense pain. She wanted to be a nurse in some famished Asiatic country; I wanted to be a famous spy.

All at once we were madly, clumsily, shamelessly, agonizingly in love with each other; hopelessly, I should add, because that frenzy of mutual possession might have been assuaged only by our actually imbibing and assimilating every particle of each other's soul and flesh; but there we were, unable even to mate as slum children would have so easily found an opportunity to do. After one wild attempt we made to meet at night in her garden (of which more later), the only privacy we were allowed was to be out of earshot but not out of sight on the populous part of the plage. There, on the soft sand, a few feet away from our elders, we would sprawl all morning, in a petrified paroxysm of desire, and take advantage of every blessed quirk in space and time to touch each other: her hand, half-hidden in the sand, would creep toward me, its slender brown fingers sleepwalking nearer and nearer; then, her opalescent knee would start on a long cautious journey; sometimes a chance rampart built by younger children granted us sufficient concealment to graze each other's salty lips; these incomplete contacts drove our healthy and inexperienced young bodies to such a state of exasperation that not even the cold blue water, under which we still clawed at each other, could bring relief.

Among some treasures I lost during the wanderings of my adult years, there was a snapshot taken by my aunt which showed Annabel, her parents and the staid, elderly, lame gentleman, a Dr. Cooper, who that same summer courted my aunt, grouped around a table in a sidewalk caf?. Annabel did not come out well, caught as she was in the act of bending over her chocolat glac?, and her thin bare shoulders and the parting in her hair were about all that could be identified (as I remember that picture) amid the sunny blur into which her lost loveliness graded; but I, sitting somewhat apart from the rest, came out with a kind of dramatic conspicuousness: a moody, beetle-browed boy in a dark sport shirt and well-tailored white shorts, his legs crossed, sitting in profile, looking away. That photograph was taken on the last day of our fatal summer and just a few minutes before we made our second and final attempt to thwart fate. Under the flimsiest of pretexts (this was our very last chance, and nothing really mattered) we escaped from the caf? to the beach, and found a desolate stretch of sand, and there, in the violet shadow of some red rocks forming a kind of cave, had a brief session of avid caresses, with somebody's lost pair of sunglasses for only witness. I was on my knees, and on the point of possessing my darling, when two bearded bathers, the old man of the sea and his brother, came out of the sea with exclamations of ribald encouragement, and four months later she died of typhus in Corfu.

4

I leaf again and again through these miserable memories, and keep asking myself, was it then, in the glitter of that remote summer, that the rift in my life began; or was my excessive desire for that child only the first evidence of an inherent singularity? When I try to analyze my own cravings, motives, actions and so forth, I surrender to a sort of retrospective imagination which feeds the analytic faculty with boundless alternatives and which causes each visualized route to fork and re-fork without end in the maddeningly complex prospect of my past. I am convinced, however, that in a certain magic and fateful way Lolita began with Annabel.

I also know that the shock of Annabel's death consolidated the frustration of that nightmare summer, made of it a permanent obstacle to any further romance throughout the cold years of my youth. The spiritual and the physical had been blended in us with a perfection that must remain incomprehensible to the matter-of-fact, crude, standard-brained youngsters of today. Long after her death I felt her thoughts floating through mine. Long before we met we had had the same dreams. We compared notes. We found strange affinities. The same June of the same year (1919) a stray canary had fluttered into her house and mine, in two widely separated countries. Oh, Lolita, had you loved me thus!

I have reserved for the conclusion of my "Annabel" phase the account of our unsuccessful first tryst. One night, she managed to deceive the vicious vigilance of her family. In a nervous and slender-leaved mimosa grove at the back of their villa we found a perch on the ruins of a low stone wall. Through the darkness and the tender trees we could see the arabesques of lighted windows which, touched up by the colored inks of sensitive memory, appear to me now like playing cards-presumably because a bridge game was keeping the enemy busy. She trembled and twitched as I kissed the corner of her parted lips and the hot lobe of her ear. A cluster of stars palely glowed above us, between the silhouettes of long thin leaves; that vibrant sky seemed as naked as she was under her light frock. I saw her face in the sky, strangely distinct, as if it emitted a faint radiance of its own. Her legs, her lovely live legs, were not too close together, and when my hand located what it sought, a dreamy and eerie expression, half-pleasure, half-pain, came over those childish features. She sat a little higher than I, and whenever in her solitary ecstasy she was led to kiss me, her head would bend with a sleepy, soft, drooping movement that was almost woeful, and her bare knees caught and compressed my wrist, and slackened again; and her quivering mouth, distorted by the acridity of some mysterious potion, with a sibilant intake of breath came near to my face. She would try to relieve the pain of love by first roughly rubbing her dry lips against mine; then my darling would draw away with a nervous toss of her hair, and then again come darkly near and let me feed on her open mouth, while with a generosity that was ready to offer her everything, my heart, my throat, my entrails, I gave her to hold in her awkward fist the scepter of my passion.

I recall the scent of some kind of toilet powder-I believe she stole it from her mother's Spanish maid-a sweetish, lowly, musky perfume. It mingled with her own biscuity odor, and my senses were suddenly filled to the brim; a sudden commotion in a nearby bush prevented them from overflowing-and as we draw away from each other, and with aching veins attended to what was probably a prowling cat, there came from the house her mother's voice calling her, with a rising frantic note-and Dr. Cooper ponderously limped out into the garden. But that mimosa grove-the haze of stars, the tingle, the flame, the honeydew, and the ache remained with me, and that little girl with her seaside limbs and ardent tongue haunted me ever since-until at last, twenty-four years later, I broke her spell by incarnating her in another.

5

The days of my youth, as I look back on them, seem to fly away from me in a flurry of pale repetitive scraps like those morning snow storms of used tissue paper that a train passenger sees whirling in the wake of the observation car. In my sanitary relations with women I was practical, ironical and brisk. While a college student, in London and Paris, paid ladies sufficed me. My studies were meticulous and intense, although not particularly fruitful. At first, I planned to take a degree in psychiatry as many manqu? talents do; but I was even more manqu? than that; a peculiar exhaustion, I am so oppressed, doctor, set in; and I switched to English literature, where so many frustrated poets end as pipe-smoking teachers in tweeds. Paris suited me. I discussed Soviet movies with expatriates. I sat with uranists in the Deux Magots. I published tortuous essays in obscure journals. I composed pastiches:


From the Trade Paperback edition. --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition CD .

Revue de presse

"The only convincing love story of our century." —Vanity Fair

"Lolita blazes with a perversity of a most original kind. For Mr. Nabokov has distilled from his shocking material hundred-proof intellectual farce…Lolita seems an assertion of the power of the comic spirit to wrest delight and truth from the most outlandish materials. It is one of the funniest serious novels I have ever read; and the vision of its abominable hero, who never deludes or excuses himself, brings into grotesque relief the cant, the vulgarity, and the hypocritical conventions that pervade the human comedy." —Atlantic Monthly

"Intensely lyrical and wildly funny." —Time

"The conjunction of a sense of humor with a sense of horror [results in] satire of a very special kind, in which vice or folly is regarded not so much with scorn as with profound dismay and a measure of tragic sympathy…The reciprocal flow of irony gives to both the characters and their surroundings the peculiar intensity of significance that attends the highest art." —The New Yorker

"Lolita is an authentic work of art which compels our immediate response and serious reflection–a revealing and indispensable comedy of horrors." —San Francisco Chronicle


From the Hardcover edition. --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition CD .


Détails sur le produit

  • Relié
  • Editeur : Greenwich House (1 janvier 1982)
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 0517388081
  • ISBN-13: 978-0517388082
  • Dimensions du produit: 20,3 x 14,2 x 2,5 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 4.5 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (15 commentaires client)
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En savoir plus sur l'auteur

Né en 1899 à Saint-Pétersbourg, Vladimir Nabokov appartenait à une famille de vieille noblesse russe. Il fit ses études dans une école privée de Saint-Pétersbourg, puis, sa famille ayant fui la Russie communiste en 1919, au Trinity College à Cambridge. Il vécut ensuite en Angleterre, en Allemagne et en France avant d'émigrer aux États-Unis où il se fait naturaliser en 1945. Nabokov a enseigné la littérature dans plusieurs universités américaines et en particulier la littérature russe à l'université de Cornell à partir de 1948. À la fin de sa vie, Nabokov résidait en Suisse où il est mort en juillet 1977.

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2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par Dominic Neesam sur 4 février 2014
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Lolita, "the subject and object of every foul poster", the "perfect commidity and consumer" of "hiccupy-music" era America is lured into Humbert Humbert's net of immorality by way of her mother's hand in marriage. A freak car crash leaves the European of "obscure ancestry" with his heart's desire, a desire that leads both to the depths of human despair. Humbert the middle-aged "glamour boy", the tall, dark stranger of masculine virility whisks pre-pubescent Dolores Haze away on a road trip of debauchery and sleazy mis-adventure. Nabokov's nymph is left to turn into a limp-winged creature, rather than the colourfully graceful form of which she might have become. In the end, Humbert not only loses his pretty young thing but can no longer hear Lolita's voice among the children at play in the school yard. He has taken her voice away along with the wings he plucked. A Russian masterpiece.
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3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par Odd Syse sur 23 novembre 2012
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I have decided to write this short review in english, even though this is a french website. I strongly recommend this novel to anyone from the age of fourteen and up! You will never forget Nabokovs way of writing, and even if you find the language difficult at times, you will get hooked on this fantastic timeless novel.
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3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par ghis sur 1 mars 2013
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
SURPRENANT APRES TOUTES LES POLEMIQUES ET LES CRITIQUES QUE J'AVAIS LUES. LA PREMIERE PARTIE EST UNE BELLE HISTOIRE D'AMOUR, PEU CONVENTIONNELLE ET CERTAINEMENT CONDAMNABLE ET LA SECONDE UNE DEGRINGOLADE DANS LA FOLIE. CONTENTE D'AVOIR ENFIN LU CE CLASSIQUE.
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1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par Minette sur 6 août 2014
Format: Broché
J'ai lu ce livre il y a bien longtemps et je l'ai adoré ...

Cette histoire singulière d'une "nymphette" de 12 ans qui séduit un homme d'âge mur est particulièrement inconvenante mais profondément érotique et surtout diablement bien écrite.

"Lolita" est LE chef d'œuvre de l'écrivain russe (naturalisé américain) Vladimir Nabokov, publié en France en 1959 aux Editions Gallimard, et qui fit grand scandale à sa sortie.

Le personnage principal du roman, "Humbert Humbert" est séduit physiquement (on pourrait presque dire "violé"), par une fillette de 12 ans -Dolorès Haze- surnommée Lolita (diminutif de Dolorès), fillette que lui-même définira comme "Nymphette" et dont il donnera dans son roman à moult reprise, la définition exacte : Soient des fillettes pré pubères plutôt "dévergondées" pour leur âge et parfaitement conscientes de leurs atouts et de leur grand pouvoir de séduction sur la gente masculine.

Pour posséder la fille, il épousera la mère (qu'il n'aime pas) et qui en mourra accidentellement quand elle découvrira son journal intime où il ne cesse d'évoquer son désir grandissant pour Lolita et son dégoût pour Charlotte (sa mère). Après les obsèques de sa femme, il deviendra l'amant de Lolita. Ils parcourront alors ensembles, en voiture et de façon erratique pendant une année, presque tous les Etats Unis, se cachant et fuyant à la fois, lui, faisant passer Lolita pour sa fille auprès des hôteliers et de leurs diverses rencontres, alors qu'elle est sa maitresse.
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6 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par Jean René TOP 100 COMMENTATEURS sur 18 janvier 2010
Format: Broché
Voici un classique dans lequel le grand Vladimir Nabokov développe toute sa virtuosité. Le thème de la passion destructrice d'un homme d'âge mur pour une mineure y est mené d'une façon palpitante. Cette passion va crescendo, tenant le lecteur en haleine, emportant les personnages (le narrateur et Lolita) dans une cavale infernale jusqu'au désastre, inévitable et programmé: le destin, tragique, était écrit. C'est un très grand roman qui, s'il paraissait aujourd'hui, ferait certainement scandale et serait peut-être boycotté en raison de son sujet particulièrement sulfureux, mais c'est une véritable oeuvre d'art. Point de morale ici; pour ceux qui se demanderaient quel est le plus coupable, de notre vieux pédophile (malgré lui serais-je presque tenté d'écrire), ou bien de cette diabolique Lolita, la réponse est complexe. Et je ne pense pas d'ailleurs que la question soit ici pertinente.

En lisant d'un trait ce livre, j'ai ressenti la même accélération irrésistible qu'avec le joueur d'échecs de Stefan Zweig. Je conseille de lire plutôt en anglais si possible ce roman que Nabokov a écrit directement dans cette langue (certaines de ses oeuvres ont en effet été écrites en français, d'autres en anglais; le mieux est de se référer à la spontanéité de la version originale).
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2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par cheikh fall sur 17 janvier 2013
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
Funny,pathetic and disturbing. It's very hard to believe that Vladimir Nabokov is not an English native speaker.This book is quite delightful for all those who like English.A must read!
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2 internautes sur 2 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par GHYSLAINE SOURCIS sur 4 mars 2013
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Une histoire étrange, troublante, dérangeante, choquante... Un excellent roman qui permet de se frotter à un vocabulaire d'anglais riche et varié.
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