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Macbeth (Anglais) Broché – 8 octobre 2013


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Descriptions du produit

Extrait

Dramatis Personae

DUNCAN, King of Scotland
MALCOLM his sons
DONALBAIN

MACBETH, Thane of Glamis, later of Cawdor, later
King of Scotland
LADY MACBETH

BANQUO, a thane of Scotland
FLEANCE, his son
MACDUFF, Thane of Fife
LADY MACDUFF
SON of Macduff and Lady Macduff

LENNEX
ROSS
MENTEITH thanes and noblemen of Scotland
ANGUS
CAITHNESS

SIWARD, Earl of Northumberland
YOUNG SIWARD, his son
SEYTON, an officer attending Macbeth
Another LORD
ENGLISH DOCTOR
SCOTTISH DOCTOR
GENTLEWOMAN attending Lady Macbeth
CAPTAIN serving Duncan
PORTER
OLD MAN
Three MURDERERS of Banquo
First MURDERERS at Macduff's castle
MESSENGER to Lady Macbeth
MESSENGER to Lady Macduff
SERVENT to Macbeth
SERVENT to Lady Macbeth
Three WITCHES or WEIRD SISTERS
HECATE
Three APPARITIONS

Lords, Gentlemen, Officers, Soldiers, Murderers,
and Attendants

SCENE: Scotland; England


Location: An open place.
hurlyburly tumult
Grimalkin i.e., gray cat, name of the witch's familiar—a demon or evil spirit supposed to answer a witch's call and to allow him or her to perform black magic.
Paddock toad; also a familiar
Anon At once, right away.

1.2 Location: A camp near Forres.
0.1 Alarum trumpet call to arms

1.1 * Thunder and lightning. Enter three Witches.

FIRST WITCH
When shall we three meet again?
In thunder, lightning, or in rain?

SECOND WITCH
When the hurlyburly's done,
When the battle's lost and won.

THIRD WITCH
That will be ere the set of sun.
first witch
Where the place?
second witch Upon the heath.
third witch
There to meet with Macbeth.

FIRST WITCH  I come, Grimalkin!

SECOND WITCH  Paddock calls.

THIRD WITCH  Anon.

ALL
Fair is foul, and foul is fair.
Hover through the fog and filthy air. Exeunt.
1.2 * Alarum within. Enter King [Duncan], Malcolm, Donalbain, Lennox, with attendants, meeting a
bleeding Captain.

DUNCAN
What bloody man is that? He can report,
As seemeth by his plight, of the revolt

newest state latest news.   sergeant i.e., staff officer. (There may be no inconsistency with his rank of "captain" in the stage direction and speech prefixes in the Folio.)
broil battle spent tired out choke their art render their skill in swimming useless.
The merciless . . . supplied The merciless Macdonwald—worthy of the hated name of rebel, for in the cause of rebellion an ever-increasing number of villainous persons and unnatural qualities swarm about him like vermin—is joined by light-armed Irish footsoldiers and ax-armed horsemen from the western islands of Scotland (the Hebrides and perhaps Ireland)
And Fortune . . . whore i.e., Fortune, proverbially a false strumpet, smiles at first on Macdonwald's damned rebellion but deserts him in his hour of need.
well . . . name well he deserves a name that is synonymous with "brave"
minion darling. (Macbeth is Valor's darling, not Fortune's.)
the slave i.e., Macdonwald
Which . . . to him i.e., Macbeth paused for no ceremonious greeting or farewell to Macdonwald.
nave navel.   chops jaws
cousin kinsman
As . . . swells Just as terrible storms at sea arise out of the east, from the place where the sun first shows itself in the seeming comfort of the dawn, even thus did a new military threat come on the heels of the seeming good news of Macdonwald's execution.
skipping (1) lightly armed, quick at maneuvering (2) skittish
surveying vantage seeing an opportunity

The newest state.

MALCOLM This is the sergeant
Who like a good and hardy soldier fought
'Gainst my captivity.—Hail, brave friend!
Say to the King the knowledge of the broil
As thou didst leave it.

CAPTAIN Doubtful it stood,
As two spent swimmers that do cling together
And choke their art. The merciless Macdonwald—
Worthy to be a rebel, for to that
The multiplying villainies of nature
Do swarm upon him—from the Western Isles
Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied;
And Fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling,
Showed like a rebel's whore. But all's too weak;
For brave Macbeth—well he deserves that name—
Disdaining Fortune, with his brandished steel,
Which smoked with bloody execution,
Like valor's minion carved out his passage
Till he faced the slave,
Which ne'er shook hands nor bade farewell to him
Till he unseamed him from the nave to th' chops,
And fixed his head upon our battlements.

DUNCAN
Oh, valiant cousin, worthy gentleman!

CAPTAIN
As whence the sun 'gins his reflection
Shipwrecking storms and direful thunders break,
So from that spring whence comfort seemed to come
Discomfort swells. Mark, King of Scotland, mark.
No sooner justice had, with valor armed,
Compelled these skipping kerns to trust their heels
But the Norweyan lord, surveying vantage,
With furbished arms and new supplies of men,
Began a fresh assault.

Yes . . . eagles Yes, about as much as sparrows terrify eagles. (Said ironically.)
say sooth tell the truth cracks charges of explosive
Except Unless memorize make memorable or famous.   Golgotha "place of a skull," where Christ was crucified. (Mark 15:22.)
Thane Scottish title of honor, roughly equivalent to "Earl"
seems to seems about to flout mock, insult fan . . . cold fan cold fear into our troops.
Norway The King of Norway.   terrible numbers terrifying numbers of troops dismal ominous
Till . . . proof i.e., until Macbeth, clad in well-tested armor. (Bellona was the Roman goddess of war.)
him i.e., the King of Norway.   self-comparisons i.e., matching counterthrusts

DUNCAN
Dismayed not this our captains, Macbeth and Banquo?

CAPTAIN
Yes, as sparrows eagles, or the hare the lion.
If I say sooth, I must report they were
As cannons overcharged with double cracks,
So they doubly redoubled strokes upon the foe.
Except they meant to bathe in reeking wounds
Or memorize another Golgotha,
I cannot tell.
But I am faint. My gashes cry for help.

DUNCAN
So well thy words become thee as thy wounds;
They smack of honor both.—Go get him surgeons.
[Exit Captain, attended.]
Enter Ross and Angus.
Who comes here?

MALCOLM The worthy Thane of Ross.

LENNEX  What a haste looks through his eyes!
So should he look that seems to speak things strange. 

ROSS  God save the King!

DUNCAN  Whence cam'st thou, worthy thane?

ROSS  From Fife, great King,
Where the Norweyan banners flout the sky
And fan our people cold.
Norway himself, with terrible numbers,
Assisted by that most disloyal traitor,
The Thane of Cawdor, began a dismal conflict,
Till that Bellona's bridegroom, lapped in proof,
Confronted him with self-comparisons,
Point against point, rebellious arm 'gainst arm,
Curbing his lavish spirit; and to conclude,
The victory fell on us.

Norways' Norwegians'.   composition agreement, treaty of peace
Saint Colme's Inch Inchcolm, the Isle of St. Columba in the Firth of Forth dollars Spanish or Dutch coins
Our (The royal "we.")   bosom close and intimate.   present immediate

Location: A heath near Forres.
Aroint thee Begone.   rump-fed runnion fat-rumped baggage
Tiger (A ship's name.)
like . . . do (Suggestive of the witches' deformity and sexual insatiability. Witches were thought to seduce men sexually. Do means [1] act [2] perform sexually.)

DUNCAN Great happiness!

ROSS  That now
Sweno, the Norways' king, craves composition;
Nor would we deign him burial of his men
Till he disbursed at Saint Colme's Inch
Ten thousand dollars to our general use.

DUNCAN
No more that Thane of Cawdor shall deceive
Our bosom interest. Go pronounce his present death,
And with his former title greet Macbeth.
ROSS  I'll see it done.

DUNCAN
What he hath lost noble Macbeth hath won.
Exeunt.
1.3 * Thunder. Enter the three Witches.

FIRST WITCH  Where hast thou been, sister?

SECOND WITCH  Killing swine.

THIRD WITCH  Sister, where thou?

FIRST WITCH
A sailor's wife had chestnuts in her lap,
And munched, and munched, and munched. "Give me," quoth I.
"Aroint thee, witch!" the rump-fed runnion cries.
Her husband's to Aleppo gone, master o'th' Tiger;
But in a sieve I'll thither sail,
And like a rat without a tail
I'll do, I'll do, and I'll do.

SECOND WITCH
I'll give thee a wind.

FIRST WITCH
Thou'rt kind.

I . . . card I can summon all other winds, wherever they blow and from whatever quarter in the shipman's compass card.

I'll . . . hay (With a suggestion of sexually draining the seaman's semen.)
penthouse lid i.e., eyelid (which projects out over the eye like a penthouse or slope-roofed structure). forbid accursed. sev'nnights weeks peak grow peaked or thin
Weird Sisters women connected with fate or destiny; also women having a mysterious or unearthly, uncanny appearance
Posters of swift travelers over

THIRD WITCH
And I another.

FIRST WITCH
I myself have all the other,
And the very ports they blow,
All the quarters that they know
I'th' shipman's card.
I'll drain him dry as hay.
Sleep shall neither night nor day
Hang upon his penthouse lid.
He shall live a man forbid.
Weary sev'nnights nine times nine
Shall he dwindle, peak, and pine.
Though his bark cannot be lost,
Yet it shall be tempest-tossed.
Look what I have.

SECOND WITCH  Show me, show me.

FIRST WITCH
Here I have a pilot's thumb,
Wrecked as homeward he did come. Drum within.

THIRD WITCH
A drum, a drum!
Macbeth doth come.
all [dancing in a circle]
The Weird Sisters, hand in hand,
Posters of the sea and land,
Thus do go about, about,
Thrice to thine, and thrice to mine,
And thrice again, to make up nine.
Peace! The charm's wound up.
Enter Macbeth and Banquo.
macbeth
So foul and fair a day I have not seen.
is't called is it said to be choppy chapped
fantastical creatures of fantasy or imagination
show appear.
grace honor
rapt withal entranced.
beg . . . hate beg your favors nor fear your hate.

BANQUO
How far is't called to Forres?—What are these,
So withered and so wild in their attire,
That look not like th'inhabitants o'th'earth
And yet are on't?—Live you? Or are you aught
That man may question? You seem to understand me
By each at once her choppy finger laying
Upon her skinny lips. You should be women,
And yet your beards forbid me to interpret
That you are so.

MACBETH Speak, if you can. What are you?

FIRST WITCH
All hail, Macbeth! Hail to thee, Thane of Glamis!

SECOND WITCH
All hail, Macbeth! Hail to thee, Thane of Cawdor!

THIRD WITCH
All hail, Macbeth, that shalt be king hereafter!

BANQUO
Good sir, why do you start and seem to fear
Things that do sound so fair?—I'th' name of truth,
Are ye fantastical or that indeed
Which outwardly ye show? My noble partner
You greet with present grace and great prediction
Of noble having and of royal hope,
That he seems rapt withal. To me you speak not.
If you can look into the seeds of time
And say which grain will grow and which will not,
Speak then to me, who neither beg nor fear
Your favors nor your hate.

FIRST WITCH  Hail!

SECOND WITCH  Hail!

THIRD WITCH  Hail!

FIRST WITCH
Lesser than Macbeth, and greater.

happy fortunate
get beget
imperfect cryptic
Sinel's (Sinel was Macbeth's father.)
Say . . . intelligence Say from what source you have this disturbing information
blasted blighted
corporal corporeal
on of.   insane root root causing insanity; variously identified

SECOND WITCH
Not so happy, yet much happier.

THIRD WITCH
Thou shalt get kings, though thou be none.

So all hail, Macbeth and Banquo!

FIRST WITCH
Banquo and Macbeth, all hail!

MACBETH
Stay, you imperfect speakers, tell me more!
By Sinel's death I know I am Thane of Glamis,
But how of Cawdor? The Thane of Cawdor lives
A prosperous gentleman; and to be king
Stands not within the prospect of belief,
No more than to be Cawdor. Say from whence
You owe this strange intelligence, or why
Upon this blasted heath you stop our way
With such prophetic greeting? Speak, I charge you.
Witches vanish.

BANQUO
The earth hath bubbles, as the water has,
And these are of them. Whither are they vanished?

MACBETH
Into the air; and what seemed corporal melted, 81
As breath into the wind. Would they had stayed!

BANQUO
Were such things here as we do speak about?
Or have we eaten on the insane root 84
That takes the reason prisoner?

MACBETH
Your children shall be kings.
banquo You shall be king.

MACBETH
And Thane of Cawdor too. Went it not so?

and when . . . his and when he reads of your extraordinary valor in fighting the rebels, he concludes that your wondrous deeds outdo any praise he could offer.
stout haughty, determined, valiant
Nothing not at all
As . . . with post As fast as could be told, i.e., counted, came messenger after messenger. (Unless the text should be amended to "As thick as hail.")
earnest token payment addition title
Who He who combined confederate line the rebel reinforce Macdonwald

BANQUO
To th' selfsame tune and words.—Who's here?
Enter Ross and Angus.

ROSS
The King hath happily received, Macbeth,
The news of thy success; and when he reads
Thy personal venture in the rebels' fight,
His wonders and his praises do contend
Which should be thine or his. Silenced with that,
In viewing o'er the rest o'th' selfsame day
He finds thee in the stout Norweyan ranks,
Nothing afeard of what thyself didst make,
Strange images of death. As thick as tale
Came post with post, and every one did bear
Thy praises in his kingdom's great defense,
And poured them down before him.

ANGUS
We are sent
To give thee from our royal master thanks,
Only to herald thee into his sight,
Not pay thee.

ROSS
And, for an earnest of a greater honor,
He bade me, from him, call thee Thane of Cawdor;
In which addition, hail, most worthy thane,
For it is thine.
BANQUO What, can the devil speak true?

MACBETH
The Thane of Cawdor lives. Why do you dress me
In borrowed robes?
ANGUS Who was the thane lives yet,
But under heavy judgment bears that life
Which he deserves to lose. Whether he was combined
With those of Norway, or did line the rebel
With hidden help and vantage, or that with both
in . . . wrack to bring about his country's ruin capital deserving death
The greatest is behind either (1) Two of the three prophecies (and thus the greatest number of them) have already been fulfilled, or (2) The greatest one, the kingship, is still to come. home all the way
In deepest consequence in the profoundly important sequel.
Cousins i.e., Fellow lords
swelling act stately drama
soliciting tempting unfix my hair make my hair stand on end
use custom.   fears things feared whose . . . fantastical in which the conception of murder is merely imaginary at this point single . . . man weak human condition function normal power of action.   surmise speculation, imaginings And . . . not and everything seems unreal. --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Broché .

Présentation de l'éditeur

The world’s leading center for Shakespeare studies.

Each edition includes:

• Freshly edited text based on the best early printed version of the play

• Full explanatory notes conveniently placed on pages facing the text of the play

• Scene-by-scene plot summaries

• A key to famous lines and phrases

• An introduction to reading Shakespeare’s language

• An essay by a leading Shakespeare scholar providing a modern perspective on the play

• Illustrations from the Folger Shakespeare Library’s vast holdings of rare books

Essay by Susan Snyder


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Détails sur le produit

  • Broché: 304 pages
  • Editeur : Simon & Schuster; Édition : Updated (8 octobre 2013)
  • Collection : Folger Shakespeare Library
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 1451694725
  • ISBN-13: 978-1451694727
  • Dimensions du produit: 14 x 1,5 x 21,3 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 4.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (4 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 192.147 en Livres anglais et étrangers (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres anglais et étrangers)
  • Table des matières complète
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1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile  Par BAGRATION COMMENTATEUR DU HALL D'HONNEUR le 29 juillet 2013
Format: Broché
La pratique macbethienne est une pratique sensée. L'assassinat politique reste une option aventureuse mais jouable. Une fois mort....que peut Guise ?
Aujourd'hui, il n'est plus possible de procéder ainsi. Il faut vivre avec son temps mais que de regrets à l'idée de ce qui eût pu être fait !
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Par Pieter le 18 octobre 2014
Format: Format Kindle Achat vérifié
Shakespeare's english is not everyone's daily fair and the mentioned 'direct translation' is completely missing. Kindle's translator also misses quite a number of words. Better to go to the theatre..
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Par GBV le 21 avril 2012
Format: Broché
Voici un ouvrage très bien fait et très utile, même pour ceux qui peuvent avoir des difficultés en Anglais. Je le recommande pour tous ceux qui souhaitent lire Shakespeare dans le texte.
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Par nicolas le 13 janvier 2014
Format: Broché Achat vérifié
j'ai acheté ce livre pour amélioré mon anglais et j'ai fais beaucoup de progrès. J'en suis très content et je le recommande fortement !
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Amazon.com: 462 commentaires
41 internautes sur 42 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Best Yet! 24 octobre 2005
Par D. Durkee - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD
I've been playing this in a regular senior English class. Many of the students are finally understanding the play. The actors in this cd do a wonderful job interpreting their lines. The Scottish accents are well done. Sound effects make it vivid. It's the best production I've found to date.
38 internautes sur 39 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
No need to avoid Shakespeare anymore 12 avril 2005
Par David E. Levine - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
I consider myself to be a reasonably literate individual but, I have always avoided Shakespeare since I cannot make sense of the text. But now, I have fianally read Macbeth because, with "No Fear Shakespeare," each left hand page is written in the original whereas the right hand page is a plain English translation. So now I know, that when a porter says "it makes him stand to and not stand to," he is not referring about someone standing up on his feet. Instead, it means that alcoholic drinks make a man have an erection but then, lose the erection. How true is that and how cool is it to be able to understand that? Seriously, Macbeth is a great tale of ambition, deception and conscience. Thanks to this innovative book, I was able to read the original, then, after reading each page, I referred to the translation so I could understand. It was fun to read lines in the original, try to work out what I thought it meant and then check whether I was right. I recommend this as a way finally read and appreciate Macbeth.
42 internautes sur 44 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Suits our needs 28 mars 2004
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
I won't even attempt to critique Shakespeare's work, as some have done here. I'm not reviewing MacBeth, but this particular version of it. As a homeschooling Mom with three highschool students, the only way we could get through Shakespeare's works is by having a copy of Shakespeare Made Easy on hand. As it is, we completed 5 plays this year - all done orally, with each of us taking several parts. While I think it's important that my kids read Shakespeare in it's original format (and they did), I had the Shakespeare Made Easy translation handy so that I could give simple, concise explanations whenever they just didn't "get it". I recommend these books for that purpose - not for the watered down versions of these classics, but to make them understandable to the average student who might otherwise find Shakespeare's works boring and a waste of time (as many students do).
29 internautes sur 31 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Great for Classroom Use 12 janvier 2007
Par Cat Silverthorne - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD
This series is wonderful if you are a teacher. It really helps students to hear how Shakespeare's words are supposed to flow when spoken by classically trained actors. Students snicker a bit at first when they hear the Scottish accents, but they get used to them quickly and the quality of the recording is excellent. The cheesy music in between acts is irritating, but you learn to ignore it. A fun bit of trivia is that the porter scene is acted by David Tennant who most people know as the current Dr. Who! It's also a treat to be able to listen to Macbeth in my car. Shakespeare makes rush-hour almost tolerable.
19 internautes sur 20 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
A "Dummy's" Dream! 15 janvier 2000
Par Barbara Cooper - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
This is a fantastic book for someone who has difficulty understanding Shakespeare's language. I was impressed with the way the book is set up--original Shakespeare on the left and a modern translation on the right.
It is especially useful to teachers or homeschoolers because of the study questions included in the back of the book.
I give it an A+!
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