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Mansfield Park [Anglais] [Relié]

Jane Austen , Kathryn Sutherland
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Description de l'ouvrage

3 novembre 2011 Clothbound Classics
Part of Penguin's beautiful hardback Clothbound Classics series, designed by the award-winning Coralie Bickford-Smith, these delectable and collectible editions are bound in high-quality colourful, tactile cloth with foil stamped into the design. Taken from the poverty of her parents' home in Portsmouth, Fanny Price is brought up with her rich cousins at Mansfield Park, acutely aware of her humble rank and with her cousin Edmund as her sole ally. During her uncle's absence in Antigua, the Crawford's arrive in the neighbourhood bringing with them the glamour of London life and a reckless taste for flirtation. Mansfield Park is considered Jane Austen's first mature work and, with its quiet heroine and subtle examination of social position and moral integrity, one of her most profound.

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Extrait

Chapter One


ABOUT THIRTY years ago, Miss Maria Ward of Huntingdon, with only seven thousand pounds, had the good luck to captivate Sir Thomas Bertram, of Mansfield Park, in the county of Northampton, and to be thereby raised to the rank of a baronet's lady, with all the comforts and consequences of an handsome house and large income. All Huntingdon exclaimed on the greatness of the match, and her uncle, the lawyer, himself, allowed her to be at least three thousand pounds short of any equitable claim to it. She had two sisters to be benefited by her elevation; and such of their acquaintance as thought Miss Ward and Miss Frances quite as handsome as Miss Maria, did not scruple to predict their marrying with almost equal advantage. But there certainly are not so many men of large fortune in the world, as there are pretty women to deserve them. Miss Ward, at the end of half a dozen years, found herself obliged to be attached to the Rev. Mr. Norris, a friend of her brother-in-law, with scarcely any private fortune, and Miss Frances fared yet worse. Miss Ward's match, indeed, when it came to the point, was not contemptible, Sir Thomas being happily able to give his friend an income in the living of Mansfield, and Mr. and Mrs. Norris began their career of conjugal felicity with very little less than a thousand a year. But Miss Frances married, in the common phrase, to disoblige her family, and by fixing on a Lieutenant of Marines, without education, fortune, or connections, did it very thoroughly. She could hardly have made a more untoward choice. Sir Thomas Bertram had interest, which, from principle as well as pride, from a general wish of doing right, and a desire of seeing all that were connected with him in situations of respectability, he would have been glad to exert for the advantage of Lady Bertram's sister; but her husband's profession was such as no interest could reach; and before he had time to devise any other method of assisting them, an absolute breach between the sisters had taken place. It was the natural result of the conduct of each party, and such as a very imprudent marriage almost always produces. To save herself from useless remonstrance, Mrs. Price never wrote to her family on the subject till actually married. Lady Bertram, who was a woman of very tranquil feelings, and a temper remarkably easy and indolent, would have contented herself with merely giving up her sister, and thinking no more of the matter: but Mrs. Norris had a spirit of activity, which could not be satisfied till she had written a long and angry letter to Fanny, to point out the folly of her conduct, and threaten her with all its possible ill consequences. Mrs. Price in her turn was injured and angry; and an answer which comprehended each sister in its bitterness, and bestowed such very disrespectful reflections on the pride of Sir Thomas, as Mrs. Norris could not possibly keep to herself, put an end to all intercourse between them for a considerable period.

Their homes were so distant, and the circles in which they moved so distinct, as almost to preclude the means of ever hearing of each other's existence during the eleven following years, or at least to make it very wonderful to Sir Thomas, that Mrs. Norris should ever have it in her power to tell them, as she now and then did in an angry voice, that Fanny had got another child. By the end of eleven years, however, Mrs. Price could no longer afford to cherish pride or resentment, or to lose one connection that might possibly assist her. A large and still increasing family, an husband disabled for active service, but not the less equal to company and good liquor, and a very small income to supply their wants, made her eager to regain the friends she had so carelessly sacrificed; and she addressed Lady Bertram in a letter which spoke so much contrition and despondence, such a superfluity of children, and such a want of almost every thing else, as could not but dispose them all to a reconciliation. She was preparing for her ninth lying-in, and after bewailing the circumstance, and imploring their countenance as sponsors to the expected child, she could not conceal how important she felt they might be to the future maintenance of the eight already in being. Her eldest was a boy of ten years old, a fine spirited fellow who longed to be out in the world; but what could she do? Was there any chance of his being hereafter useful to Sir Thomas in the concerns of his West Indian property? No situation would be beneath him-or what did Sir Thomas think of Woolwich? or how could a boy be sent out to the East?

The letter was not unproductive. It re-established peace and kindness. Sir Thomas sent friendly advice and professions, Lady Bertram dispatched money and baby-linen, and Mrs. Norris wrote the letters.

Such were its immediate effects, and within a twelvemonth a more important advantage to Mrs. Price resulted from it. Mrs. Norris was often observing to the others, that she could not get her poor sister and her family out of her head, and that much as they had all done for her, she seemed to be wanting to do more: and at length she could not but own it to be her wish, that poor Mrs. Price should be relieved from the charge and expense of one child entirely out of her great number. "What if they were among them to undertake the care of her eldest daughter, a girl now nine years old, of an age to require more attention than her poor mother could possibly give? The trouble and expense of it to them, would be nothing compared with the benevolence of the action." Lady Bertram agreed with her instantly. "I think we cannot do better," said she, "let us send for the child."

Sir Thomas could not give so instantaneous and unqualified a consent. He debated and hesitated;-it was a serious charge;-a girl so brought up must be adequately provided for, or there would be cruelty instead of kindness in taking her from her family. He thought of his own four children-of his two sons-of cousins in love, &c.;-but no sooner had he deliberately begun to state his objections, than Mrs. Norris interrupted him with a reply to them all whether stated or not.

"My dear Sir Thomas, I perfectly comprehend you, and do justice to the generosity and delicacy of your notions, which indeed are quite of a piece with your general conduct; and I entirely agree with you in the main as to the propriety of doing every thing one could by way of providing for a child one had in a manner taken into one's own hands; and I am sure I should be the last person in the world to withhold my mite upon such an occasion. Having no children of my own, who should I look to in any little matter I may ever have to bestow, but the children of my sisters?-and I am sure Mr. Norris is too just-but you know I am a woman of few words and professions. Do not let us be frightened from a good deed by a trifle. Give a girl an education, and introduce her properly into the world, and ten to one but she has the means of settling well, without farther expense to any body.

A niece of our's, Sir Thomas, I may say, or, at least of your's, would not grow up in this neighbourhood without many advantages. I don't say she would be so handsome as her cousins. I dare say she would not; but she would be introduced into the society of this country under such very favourable circumstances as, in all human probability, would get her a creditable establishment. You are thinking of your sons-but do not you know that of all things upon earth that is the least likely to happen; brought up, as they would be, always together like brothers and sisters? It is morally impossible. I never knew an instance of it. It is, in fact, the only sure way of providing against the connection. Suppose her a pretty girl, and seen by Tom or Edmund for the first time seven years hence, and I dare say there would be mischief. The very idea of her having been suffered to grow up at a distance from us all in poverty and neglect, would be enough to make either of the dear sweet-tempered boys in love with her. But breed her up with them from this time, and suppose her even to have the beauty of an angel, and she will never be more to either than a sister."

"There is a great deal of truth in what you say," replied Sir Thomas, "and far be it from me to throw any fanciful impediment in the way of a plan which would be so consistent with the relative situations of each. I only meant to observe, that it ought not to be lightly engaged in, and that to make it really serviceable to Mrs. Price, and creditable to ourselves, we must secure to the child, or consider ourselves engaged to secure to her hereafter, as circumstances may arise, the provision of a gentlewoman, if no such establishment should offer as you are so sanguine in expecting."

"I thoroughly understand you," cried Mrs. Norris; "you are every thing that is generous and considerate, and I am sure we shall never disagree on this point. Whatever I can do, as you well know, I am always ready enough to do for the good of those I love; and, though I could never feel for this little girl the hundredth part of the regard I bear your own dear children, nor consider her, in any respect, so much my own, I should hate myself if I were capable of neglecting her. Is not she a sister's child? and could I bear to see her want, while I had a bit of bread to give her? My dear Sir Thomas, with all my faults I have a warm heart: and, poor as I am, would rather deny myself the necessaries of life, than do an ungenerous thing. So, if you are not against it, I will write to my poor sister to-morrow, and make the proposal; and, as soon as matters are settled, I will engage to get the child to Mansfield; you shall have no trouble about it. My own trouble, you know, I never regard.

I will send Nanny to London on purpose, and she may have a bed at her cousin, the sadler's, and the child be appointed to meet her there. They may easily get her from Portsmouth to town by the coach, under the care of any creditable person that may chance to be g... --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Poche .

Revue de presse

[Coralie Bickford-Smith's] recent work for Penguin Classics is...nothing short of glorious (Anna Cole)

Détails sur le produit

  • Relié: 560 pages
  • Editeur : Penguin Classics (3 novembre 2011)
  • Collection : Clothbound Classics
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 0141197706
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141197708
  • Dimensions du produit: 20,4 x 13,4 x 3,4 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 4.8 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (6 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 80.301 en Livres anglais et étrangers (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres anglais et étrangers)
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En savoir plus sur l'auteur

Jane Austen, dernière d'une famille de cinq enfants, est née le 16 décembre 1775 à Stevenson dans le Hampshire (Angleterre). Entre sa vingtième et sa vingt-cinquième année, Jane Austen écrit trois récits de jeunesse qui deviennent des pièces maîtresses de son œuvre : Elinor et Mariane, Raison et Sentiments (1795), First Impression, ébauche d'Orgueil et Préjugés, et enfin, en 1798, Northanger Abbey. Après la mort de son père, Jane Austen s'installe avec sa mère et sa sœur à Chatow, où elle va écrire l'essentiel de son œuvre. En 1811, un éditeur londonien soumet pour la première fois au grand public, sous couvert d'anonymat, Raison et Sentiments. Elle publie ensuite Mansfield Park, mais c'est avec Emma que Jane Austen s'impose véritablement sur la scène littéraire. Son œuvre compte aujourd'hui parmi les classiques de la littérature anglaise et a fait l'objet de nombreuses adaptations cinématographiques : Emma, réalisé par Douglas McGrath, Raison et Sentiments sorti en 1996 et mis en scène par Ang Lee avec Hugh Grant, Emma Thompson et Kate Winsley dans les rôles principaux, et Orgueil et préjugés, adapté au cinéma en 2006 par Joe Wright.

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Format:Broché
Trois sœurs et trois mariages fort différents. Mary épouse Lord Bertram, riche possesseur de Mansfield Park quand sa soeur épouse Norris, un curé peu argenté. La petite dernière se mésallie avec un vague ivrogne, Price. Ces derniers ont bien sûr bien du mal avec leurs dix enfants et Mmes Bertram et Norris décident de leur venir en aide : ils permettent à leur fils aîné de trouver une place de mousse et invitent Fanny à venir vivre à Mansfield Park avec son oncle, ses tantes (Norris, veuve, vit à un jet de pierre de là) et ses quatre cousins. Si Fanny n’est pas aussi mal traitée que Cendrillon, elle n’est pas non plus bien plus considérée qu’une servante. Sa tante Bertram, molle et indolente, ne peut rien faire seule et exige une compagnie permanente. L’autre tante est si pingre qu’elle interdit que Fanny ait du feu dans la pièce où elle a l’habitude de se retirer. Les cousines sont aussi idiotes que méprisantes et l’aîné est trop occupé à dilapider la fortune familiale pour s’intéresser à elle. Seul Edmund s'attache à elle et la traite avec considération. Quand Henry Crawford et sa sœur Mary s'installe dans le voisinage le jeu très Austenien de qui-épouse-qui peut commencer. Bien évidemment Fanny et Edmund sont (du point de vue de l'auteur) les deux candidats à suivre. (A trente pages de la fin, Jane Austen se rend compte qu'elle n'a plus tant de papier que ça dans son tiroir et doit donc condenser son histoire, un peu trop peut-être. Lire la suite ›
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4.0 étoiles sur 5 Fidèle au livre 13 décembre 2013
Par Hanna
Format:Broché|Achat authentifié par Amazon
Très proche du livre, ce qui, pour moi, est essentiel.
La performance des acteurs est à saluer..même si, personnellement,je ne suis pas vraiment fan du choix de certains,ou tout au moins de l'attitude qui leur a été demandée..(Le rôle de Mr Price et celui de Lady Bertram sont "outrés",)
Sylvestra Le Touzel est une Fanny parfaite...
Bernard Hepton (Sir Thomas..)Nicholas Farrell (Edmond Bertram),Samantha Bond (Maria Bertram) Anna Massey (Mrs Norris) et j'en passe, sont tous excellents

Pour le reste..
Attitudes, sentiments..tout y est..même le rythme extrêmement lent..

Le seul tableau que je pense être à la limite de l'acceptable est l'attitude de Lady Bertram..Indolence n'étant pas synonyme d'attitude "bébête", on comprend mal le rôle joué par Angela Pleasence..
Cela donne l'impression d'être devant une femme/bébé et c'est assez désagréable.

Ce film plaira à ceux qui aime les très longs films construits dans un grand respect du livre/support.
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 superbe 27 septembre 2013
Par CeeCeeB
Format:Relié|Achat authentifié par Amazon
J'ai acheté presque toute la série de Flipbacks de Jane Austen sur Amazon.
Ces petits livres sont magnifiques, tiennent facilement dans une poche ou dans un sac à main.
L'orientation de lecture est inédite et agréable. Les couvertures sont très jolies et décoratives dans une bibliothèque.
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