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Page Artiste Paul Revere and The Raiders


Détails sur le produit

  • CD (7 février 2000)
  • Nombre de disques: 1
  • Format : CD, Import
  • Label: Sundazed
  • ASIN : B000046PUD
  • Autres éditions : CD  |  Album vinyle  |  Téléchargement MP3
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Amazon.com: HASH(0x9ef01048) étoiles sur 5 18 commentaires
13 internautes sur 13 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x99d06798) étoiles sur 5 Rockin' Paul Revere 7 avril 2004
Par Ron - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD
1966 was possibly the greatest year in rock & roll history. The Beach Boys' "Pet Sounds", Bob Dylan's "Blonde on Blonde", "Revolver" by the Beatles, and "Face to Face" by the Kinks were all released in 1966. I add to that list"Midnight Ride" by Paul Revere & the Raiders. It was their third album for Columbia (fifth overall), and the first not to rely heavily on cover versions of other people's songs. "Kicks" and "I'm Not Your Steppin' Stone" were supplied by the songwriting teams of Mann-Weil and Boyce-Hart. Paul Revere and Mark Lindsay wrote six of the songs on the album, and one of the CD bonus tracks, "Shake it Up". Guitarist Drake Levin contributed "Ballad of a Useless Man" and collaborated with drummer Mike Smith ("There's Always Tomorrow") and bassist Phil Volk ("Get it On"). Most of the songs have the basic sound of the band playing together. Revere's Vox organ is prominent in the mix, and Levin's rhythmic guitar is unmistakeable. Also of note is the strong bass lines from Volk. 60's recordings usually buried bass guitar in the mix, unless it was a Motown record. Maybe the Raiders learned a few tricks from them. The clarity on this CD is eye opening. I've never heard "Kicks" sound as good as it does on this CD. "I'm Not Your Steppin' Stone" will have you forgetting all about the Monkees version - Mark growls out the lyrics like nobody's business! "Louie Go Home" is a killer Revere - Lindsay collaboration that should have been a single. It would have been a smash. "Take a Look at Yourself" is another killer rocker with strong lyrics. On the lighter side, there's Mark singing to the "Little Girl in the 4th Row" - some of the band members hated it, but Lindsay's teen fans loved it; "Melody for an Unknown Girl", an instrumental featuring Mark's sensitive sax; and "There She Goes", an up pop number with producer Terry Melcher on background vocals. The Raiders were to go on to make more sophisticated pop albums (with practically unlimited studio time as they desired), but it doesn't get any better than this: one of America's greatest bands rockin' it out with a great batch of songs.
14 internautes sur 15 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x99e6796c) étoiles sur 5 another favorite ! 25 novembre 2001
Par Alejandra Vernon - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD Achat vérifié
I know...I have a lot of favorite Raider CDs...but this one has to be a top 5 favorite.
From '66, it was their 3rd LP for Columbia, and a big transition, as 9 of the 11 tunes were written by them...the exceptions: The terrific Mann/Weill "Kicks", which was a big hit for them, and the Boyce/Hart "I'm Not Your Stepping Stone", which The Monkeys did a cover of and had a hit with...but this is the original version, and it's a knockout.
Drake contributed "Ballad of a Useless Man", which is a compassionate look at the homeless (and in the '60s this wasn't a common point of view), along with 2 other songs, and the other 5 are by Mark and Paul. Perhaps the most interesting musically on the entire CD is "All I Really Need is You", with its many time/rhythm changes...it ends with the lovely instrumental, "Melody for an Unknown Girl", with Mark doing a smooth sax solo and the spoken parts.
The bonus tracks: "Shake it Up", another Mark/Paul piece that's a rousing instrumental, and the Italian version of "Little Girl in the 4th Row". I feel the inclusion of "SS 396" and "Corvair Baby", which were recorded earlier ('65) and are in a "Beach Boys style", though neat songs, just don't fit in with the mood of the rest of this CD, and are kind of a jarring finish to an otherwise unique and excellent recording...(...)
5 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x9a650888) étoiles sur 5 One of the most perfect albums in the genre of music called, rock'n'roll 27 février 2012
Par Tom Brody - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD
On this album, KICKS was the highest charting song. KICKS is distinguished by its lead guitar riff played on the twelve string guitar. This riff is played over and over again, and it is somewhat similar to the repeated riff in DAY TRIPPER by the Fab Four. In KICKS, the singer begins, almost with a whisper, for the first stanza. Then, there is a transition, and the voice becomes pure and strong. The bridge, at the center of the song, is particularly clever. If one was compelled to compare it to anything, the bridge is somewhat like that in HELP by the Fab Four. Here, I am referring to the descending motif, where the bass notes have a twangy sound. After the bridge comes the chorus. The chorus has the men, singing in unison.

THERE'S ALWAYS TOMORROW is somewhat like a country/western song with a quick-stepping bass line.

LITTLE GIRL IN THE 4th ROW is about the vocalist's puppy love for a girl in the audience. He's helpless to introduce himself because he needs to be on stage. The song has a slow, plodding rhythm, and the bass line has a luscious timbre. The key shifts up a notch halfway through the song. I used to think that the song was about a boy in love with a girl in the 4th row at school, in the 4th row of classroom seating. But that is not what its about. The lyrics go like this: "All my life I had dreamed of that one certain girl. And I know just exactly how I'd want her to be. She looked so fine. And she'd want to be mine. And now I've found her, but it don't do not good for me, 'cause she's that little girl, little girl in the 4th row, little girl how can you know that my heart's full of pain, 'cause I've got to be leaving when the show's over . . ." (Personally, I would not recommend establishing a romantic goal based on somebody's appearance, especially not from a viewing from the stage to the 4th row. The girl could be scatterbrained, or her life's ambition could be limited to the style of her next pair of shoes, or she could have a pretty face (but a huge, ungainly bottom), and so on and so forth. At any rate, the tune is nice, and the song's expression of yearning is honestly done.

BALLAD OF A USELESS MAN is a recitative, from start to finish. For garage band wannabees, Ballad of a Useless Man is well suited for a band member who cannot sing.

I'M NOT YOUR STEPPING STONE has growling vocals, on par with the growling found on the first album by KILLING JOKE. KILLING JOKE's first album arguably has the best collection of growling vocals found on any rock'n'roll album, outside of the genre known as "grindcore." At any rate, there is no need to detail I'M NOT YOUR STEPPING STONE, since it received a fair amount of airplay. Needless to say, this version of I'M NOT YOUR STEPPING STONE is magnitudes superior to the version by that other rock'n'roll band.

THERE SHE GOES is a lively country/western rockabilly song. The tune is a fine one. The lead guitar parts ring clear as a bell, or perhaps, like a penetrating set of chimes. The song begins with a motif of three power chords. From then on, the lyrics go, "There she goes, walkin' away from me, startin' to make me cry, throwin' away my life and lovin' heart. The bridge in the song has a changed key. In the bridge, and behind the lead vocal, we hear a chorus of, "DOOO, doo-doo. DOOO, doo-doo."

TAKE A LOOK AT YOURSELF has a great walking bass line, equal to anything composed by Paul McCartney. The lyrics start out with, "You say I'm the one that's wrong, but of you'd stop and think for long, soon you'd sing a different song for meee-ee-ee-ee!" These lyrics are processed with an echo chamber. The bridge has a change in key, and there are plenty of bended notes from the lead guitar.

ALL I REALLY NEED IS YOU is one of the most dramatic songs in the realm of rock'n'roll. The rhythm is like a start-and-stop rhythm, at least at first. Then, the lead guitar enters, providing a raga motif, imported from Bombay or Calcutta (I can't tell which). The singing is somewhat like growling. Then, there is a bit of a syncopation, where the beat changes, and the singing is anthemic and soaring. In detail, the song begins with 4/4 time with a slipped, syncopated beat that goes like this: BOMP thuddunk, BOMP thuddunk, BOMP thuddunk. The vocals go, "All my life I've worked and slaved and cried and prayed and tried to do the things . . . that people tell us we should do." Then, the key changes to a half step higher, but the BOMP thuddunk beat continues. "Now, now I see the things I try for most are things about which they can boast, but I don't want to act the way they do." Then, the beat switches to 3/4 time, and a chorus of voices bursts forth with, "While you smile at me and say, you don't care for money. All my troubles go away, I'm so lucky honey, all I really need is you by my side!!!"

GET IT ON starts with guitar glissandos, and the vocal begins with a low-throated ominous quality. The lead guitar is complex, and seems to be double-tracked. Later, the vocal features full-throttled screaming.

LOUIE GO HOME starts with a riff on the low strings of the lead guitar. Then, the rhythm guitar chips in, with clipped chords, sounding something like an accompaniment to a scorching rhythm'n'blues number from James Brown. The singing is more like a gutteral chant. But the bridge has a chorus of harmonious voices. Towards the end, the song changes to 3/4-time, with the lead guitar dominating with a solo that resembles a strummed raga, or perhaps, a strummed Scottish bagpipe, or perhaps a carrousel, or perhaps all three of these. After viewing several renditions of LOUIE GO HOME from a certain internet source, I realized that some of LOUIE GO HOME, e.g., the bridge or chorus, was copied from or at least influenced by FOR YOUR LOVE, a hit by the YARDBIRDS. It is also the case that THE WHO copied LOUIE GO HOME in their "own" song called, LUBIE, COME BACK HOME. However, LUBIE, COME BACK HOME by THE WHO only copies the lyrics, and does not copy the excellent chord structure or excellent musical style of LOUIE GO HOME by Paul Revere and the Raiders.

MELODY FOR AN UNKNOWN GIRL starts with a vocal recitative, where the singer recites his devotion to a girl he's not yet met. The recitative starts like this, "Sometimes it's hard to say the right words even when they're written in your heart. Most songs have words but this one, which is written for someone I don't even know yet . . ." Following this, the listener is treated to a forlorn-sounding saxophone solo.
4 internautes sur 4 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x9a0fbf3c) étoiles sur 5 One of the most perfect albums in the realm of rock'n'roll 25 février 2012
Par Tom Brody - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD
On this album, KICKS was the highest charting song. KICKS is distinguished by its lead guitar riff played on the twelve string guitar. This riff is played over and over again, and it is somewhat similar to the repeated riff in DAY TRIPPER by the Fab Four. In KICKS, the singer begins, almost with a whisper, for the first stanza. Then, there is a transition, and the voice becomes pure and strong. The bridge, at the center of the song, is particularly clever. If one was compelled to compare it to anything, the bridge is somewhat like that in HELP by the Fab Four. Here, I am referring to the descending motif, where the bass notes have a twangy sound. After the bridge comes the chorus. The chorus has the men, singing in unison.

THERE'S ALWAYS TOMORROW is somewhat like a country/western song with a quick-stepping bass line.

LITTLE GIRL IN THE 4th ROW is about the vocalist's puppy love for a girl in the audience. He's helpless to introduce himself because he needs to be on stage. The song has a slow, plodding rhythm, and the bass line has a luscious timbre. The key shifts up a notch halfway through the song. I used to think that the song was about a boy in love with a girl in the 4th row at school, in the 4th row of classroom seating. But that is not what its about. The lyrics go like this: "All my life I had dreamed of that one certain girl. And I know just exactly how I'd want her to be. She looked so fine. And she'd want to be mine. And now I've found her, but it don't do not good for me, 'cause she's that little girl, little girl in the 4th row, little girl how can you know that my heart's full of pain, 'cause I've got to be leaving when the show's over . . ." (Personally, I would not recommend establishing a romantic goal based on somebody's appearance, especially not from a viewing from the stage to the 4th row. The girl could be scatterbrained, or her life's ambition could be limited to the style of her next pair of shoes, or she could have a pretty face (but a huge, ungainly bottom), and so on and so forth. At any rate, the tune is nice, and the song's expression of yearning is honestly done.

BALLAD OF A USELESS MAN is a recitative, from start to finish. For garage band wannabees, Ballad of a Useless Man is well suited for a band member who cannot sing.

I'M NOT YOUR STEPPING STONE has growling vocals, on par with the growling found on the first album by KILLING JOKE. KILLING JOKE's first album arguably has the best collection of growling vocals found on any rock'n'roll album, outside of the genre known as "grindcore." At any rate, there is no need to detail I'M NOT YOUR STEPPING STONE, since it received a fair amount of airplay. Needless to say, this version of I'M NOT YOUR STEPPING STONE is magnitudes superior to the version by that other rock'n'roll band.

THERE SHE GOES is a lively country/western rockabilly song. The tune is a fine one. The lead guitar parts ring clear as a bell, or perhaps, like a penetrating set of chimes. The song begins with a motif of three power chords. From then on, the lyrics go, "There she goes, walkin' away from me, startin' to make me cry, throwin' away my life and lovin' heart. The bridge in the song has a changed key. In the bridge, and behind the lead vocal, we hear a chorus of, "DOOO, doo-doo. DOOO, doo-doo."

TAKE A LOOK AT YOURSELF has a great walking bass line, equal to anything composed by Paul McCartney. The lyrics start out with, "You say I'm the one that's wrong, but of you'd stop and think for long, soon you'd sing a different song for meee-ee-ee-ee!" These lyrics are processed with an echo chamber. The bridge has a change in key, and there are plenty of bended notes from the lead guitar.

ALL I REALLY NEED IS YOU is one of the most dramatic songs in the realm of rock'n'roll. The rhythm is like a start-and-stop rhythm, at least at first. Then, the lead guitar enters, providing a raga motif, imported from Bombay or Calcutta (I can't tell which). The singing is somewhat like growling. Then, there is a bit of a syncopation, where the beat changes, and the singing is anthemic and soaring. In detail, the song begins with 4/4 time with a slipped, syncopated beat that goes like this: BOMP thuddunk, BOMP thuddunk, BOMP thuddunk. The vocals go, "All my life I've worked and slaved and cried and prayed and tried to do the things . . . that people tell us we should do." Then, the key changes to a half step higher, but the BOMP thuddunk beat continues. "Now, now I see the things I try for most are things about which they can boast, but I don't want to act the way they do." Then, the beat switches to 3/4 time, and a chorus of voices bursts forth with, "While you smile at me and say, you don't care for money. All my troubles go away, I'm so lucky honey, all I really need is you by my side!!!"

GET IT ON starts with guitar glissandos, and the vocal begins with a low-throated ominous quality. The lead guitar is complex, and seems to be double-tracked. Later, the vocal features full-throttled screaming.

LOUIE GO HOME starts with a riff on the low strings of the lead guitar. Then, the rhythm guitar chips in, with clipped chords, sounding something like an accompaniment to a scorching rhythm'n'blues number from James Brown. The singing is more like a gutteral chant. But the bridge has a chorus of harmonious voices. Towards the end, the song changes to 3/4-time, with the lead guitar dominating with a solo that resembles a strummed raga, or perhaps, a strummed Scottish bagpipe, or perhaps a carrousel, or perhaps all three of these. After viewing several renditions of LOUIE GO HOME from a certain internet source, I realized that some of LOUIE GO HOME, e.g., the bridge or chorus, was copied from or at least influenced by FOR YOUR LOVE, a hit by the YARDBIRDS. It is also the case that THE WHO copied LOUIE GO HOME in their "own" song called, LUBIE, COME BACK HOME. However, LUBIE, COME BACK HOME by THE WHO only copies the lyrics, and does not copy the excellent chord structure or excellent musical style of LOUIE GO HOME by Paul Revere and the Raiders.

MELODY FOR AN UNKNOWN GIRL starts with a vocal recitative, where the singer recites his devotion to a girl he's not yet met. The recitative starts like this, "Sometimes it's hard to say the right words even when they're written in your heart. Most songs have words but this one, which is written for someone I don't even know yet . . ." Following this, the listener is treated to a forlorn-sounding saxophone solo.
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x9a82ed08) étoiles sur 5 A Remarkable Album 8 avril 2015
Par Morten Vindberg - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD
"Midnight Ride" is in many ways a remarkable album in Paul Revere & The Raiders catalog. First and foremost, because the album is great and one of the group's most successful and consistent albums. But also because the group on this album really had begun tackling the songwriting, so that all group members have actually got song-writing credits. It’s also the album where the group perhaps best known number "Kicks" is included.

After the group's shift to Columbia Records (with Terry Melchior as producer) they changed their style from being a purely entertainment dance band to being a comtemporary band heavily inspired by the British scene, but also American bands like The Monkees, The Turtles and The Byrds. There is "Midnight Ride" are examples of most of these sources of inspiration. The group, however, continued their unpretentious and entertaining stage performance, which meant that many people, in a time when the young wished rock music should be assessed as a serious form of expression or art, found it hard to take them seriously. In retrospect, the group had deserved much greater recognition for their music than they did in their time.

In those days many albums, especially the US, had a rather short playing-time - often less than 30 minutes. This also applies to "Midnight Ride" which can be felt pretty short.

The album opens blazingly with the hit "Kicks," written by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, known for several big hits.

Guitarist Drake Levin is credited with three songs, all in basic R & B style - not unlike the early Kinks albums. The best among these is probably "Ballad of a Useless Man". You must not underestimate Levin's contribution to the group's sound, with his melodic crisp sounding guitarplaying.

Singer Mark Lindsay and Paul Revere are credited for not less than six songs, which all in varying degrees are really good. The fine ballad "Little Girl in the 4th Row", could almost sound like a Knickerbockers recording.

On "There She Goes" you may feel inspiration from Chris Hillman and The Byrds – a fine track. On the more complex "All I Really Need Is You" you may easily get The Turtles in mind, while "Louie, Go Home" is garage rock in the best Standells style. A little Monkees / Nesmith country rock can be found on another fine track "Take a Look at Yourself".

The album's final track is also a Lindsay / Revere composition, "Melody For an Unknown Girl" with words recited and where a great saxophone theme goes right in the heart of the listener - could easily have been the inspiration for Gerry Rafferty's "Baker Street" theme.

Finally, there is a version of Boyce / Hart's "Steppin 'Stone", which does not differ significantly from the more famous Monkees version.
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