Vous l'avez déjà ?
Repliez vers l'arrière Repliez vers l'avant
Ecoutez Lecture en cours... Interrompu   Vous écoutez un extrait de l'édition audio Audible
En savoir plus
Voir les 2 images

Miracleman: A Dream of Flying (Anglais) Broché – juin 1990


Voir les 3 formats et éditions Masquer les autres formats et éditions
Prix Amazon Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Broché
"Veuillez réessayer"
EUR 133,56 EUR 78,85
--Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Relié.


Détails sur le produit


En savoir plus sur les auteurs

Découvrez des livres, informez-vous sur les écrivains, lisez des blogs d'auteurs et bien plus encore.

Quels sont les autres articles que les clients achètent après avoir regardé cet article?

Commentaires en ligne

Il n'y a pas encore de commentaires clients sur Amazon.fr
5 étoiles
4 étoiles
3 étoiles
2 étoiles
1 étoiles

Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 14 commentaires
26 internautes sur 26 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Brilliant portrayal of a superhero in the "real" world 7 août 2002
Par Bob Quasit - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
In "MiracleMan" (UK vt. "MarvelMan") Alan Moore places a classic superhero type in the "real" world - a world very much like this one, in which people who see a man in tights are not going to think "super".
During a terrorist hijacking at a nuclear plant news photographer Michael Moran suffers a debilitating headache and mutters a word he sees from the wrong side of a glass door. And is transformed.
But people don't know what to make of a man who is invulnerable and can fly, and that includes Moran's wife. She asks why she'd never heard of MiracleMan and his now-remembered superfriends, and he has no answer. And the truth of the matter is world-shaking, literally.
This is just an outstanding book. The series hit a very dark spot in a later volume, one which I found personally distasteful, and it seemed to lose its focus by the time Neil Gaiman took it over; unfortunately it was never finished. Nonetheless, an excellent and enduring deconstruction of the idea of the superhero.
I'd recommend Moore's "V for Vendetta" to those who like this book.
One point: the graphic novel edition (the one that I have anyway), is missing several pages which were included at the beginning of the original comic. The comic began with a deliberately cheesy Captain Marvel-style story about time travel, but suddenly froze at the end of the story and zoomed in on MiracleMan's face, panel by panel. "Behold I teach you the superman: he is this lightning, he is this madness!" -Nietzsche, "Thus Spoke Zarathustra". The next page was the beginning of the graphic novel, with a far more realistic art and writing style. A very effective demonstration of what Moore planned to do to the cliches of the superhero genre. I don't know why it was eliminated.
18 internautes sur 18 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
SHAZA--I mean, KIMOTA!!! 8 novembre 2001
Par JR Pinto - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
There is a weird feeling you get, reading Alan Moore's Miracleman stories-the feeling that you're not reading a comic book. The story takes place in the real world-not the comic book universe. As the story opens, we find middle-aged Mike Moran being haunted by dreams of flying. During a terrorist raid, he is taken hostage and suddenly remembers his magic word and becomes a super-hero again. Having forgotten his past for twenty years, it all comes flooding back to him: which presents him with his biggest problem-how to explain things to the misses! As he does, she (famously) begins to laugh at him! The inconsistencies of his super-hero past begin to become apparent to him. Of course something is wrong here. Just what that something is, and how Alan Moore explains it are left for you to be seen.
Of course Miracleman (Marvelman in England) is the British version of Captain Marvel. In reincarnating him, Alan Moore (as is his want) completely reinvents him for a new age. Miracleman is `aufgehobened' for a new era. For me, the best superhero comics like this, The Watchmen, and Marvels, try to portray their larger-than-life heroes as realistically as possible and, MOST IMPORTANTLY, put them in the real world, populated by real people, with real consequences for their actions. In Mike Moran's universe, Superman is well-known...as a comic book character. When Miracleman bursts onto the scene (literally) we imagine what it would be like if a super-hero really appeared in our world. But then, the adventure begins...
16 internautes sur 19 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
This isn't your father's Superman... 3 mai 2000
Par Brandon B. Alspaugh - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
There's a hint of disdain in Moore's Marvelman (renamed Miracleman for distribution in the US, for obvious reasons) for virtually every aspect of the comic "super hero". His response? Laugh a bit, have his fun, and then go on to analyze what a super hero would REALLY mean to our world.
His hero isn't some rock-jawed alien or identity disassociative with a predilection for flying rodents. He's a normal person, and Moore doesn't forget this for a second; when Moran, or Miracleman, is being laughed at by his wife (obviously the voice of Moore in this instance) as he describes his absurd past as a superhero, he shatters a table in frustration.
This book, along with it successive volumes The Red King Syndrome and Olympus, are Moore's legacy to the world of the super hero. Neil Gaiman ties up the package nicely with The Golden Age. In the end, you're left with a lot more questions than answers...but then, that's the point, now isn't it?
9 internautes sur 10 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Wait For The Marvel Omnibus 19 août 2009
Par W. Rosen - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
Marvel Comics now owns the rights to this character as of 2009 so expect to see an omnibus edition containing the entire series. If you can wait a year or so you'll save a small fortune over the individual issues and graphic novel collections. Who knows we may even see new material from Gaiman and/or Moore.
4 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Visions and revisions 8 janvier 2011
Par Neal Stanifer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
By now, it has become a cliche to depict the fascist superman, the debauched superman, the corrupt superman. Any number of renegade comics writers have made careers out of this sort of thing, to the point that it's become a bit of a yawn. But this is where it started, for good or ill -- and in my opinion, for both. Miracleman is a twisted take on such heroes as Captain Marvel and Superman, and as such, it will disappoint many modern readers as being too deconstructive. I concur, to an extent. As someone who cut his literary teeth on Captain America and Captain Marvel, I have little sympathy for latter-day counter-culturists who subvert icons to make a vague and murky point about human evil.

But there is power here, and poetry. The hubris of the superhuman is here taken to its logical conclusion, and the result is devastating -- and a little bit glorious, to be honest. It's a trip every comics fan has taken in his or her mind, and it's one that has waited for a long time to see the light of day. ("What If" scenarios cynically designed to reinforce the status quo don't count, sorry.)

If you're looking for lighter fare, you might try All-Star Superman or some of DC's Spotlight collections. And if you're looking for a cold-blooded killer who blames his sociopathy on a crappy upbringing or whatever, then you might be happier with Wolverine or Deadpool or Punisher or...any number of other murderers. But if you've ever wondered about the hair's-breadth line that separates a world-saving hero from a world-devouring villain, then this book is a must-have. Buy two copies -- you'll be loaning one out...a lot.
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ? Dites-le-nous

Rechercher des articles similaires par rubrique


Commentaires

Souhaitez-vous compléter ou améliorer les informations sur ce produit ? Ou faire modifier les images?