Commencez à lire My Beloved World sur votre Kindle dans moins d'une minute. Vous n'avez pas encore de Kindle ? Achetez-le ici Ou commencez à lire dès maintenant avec l'une de nos applications de lecture Kindle gratuites.

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

 
 
 

Essai gratuit

Découvrez gratuitement un extrait de ce titre

Envoyer sur votre Kindle ou un autre appareil

Tout le monde peut lire les livres Kindle, même sans un appareil Kindle, grâce à l'appli Kindle GRATUITE pour les smartphones, les tablettes et les ordinateurs.
My Beloved World
 
Agrandissez cette image
 

My Beloved World [Format Kindle]

Sonia Sotomayor
4.0 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (1 commentaire client)

Prix conseillé : EUR 12,15 De quoi s'agit-il ?
Prix éditeur - format imprimé : EUR 12,42
Prix Kindle : EUR 8,32 TTC & envoi gratuit via réseau sans fil par Amazon Whispernet
Économisez : EUR 4,10 (33%)

Formats

Prix Amazon Neuf à partir de Occasion à partir de
Format Kindle EUR 8,32  
Relié, Séquence inédite EUR 21,62  
Broché EUR 12,45  
Broché EUR 13,15  
CD, Livre audio, Version intégrale EUR 31,35  
-40%, -50%, -60%... Découvrez les Soldes Amazon jusqu'au 5 août 2014 inclus. Profitez-en !





Les clients ayant acheté cet article ont également acheté


Descriptions du produit

Extrait

From Chapter 11

I was working my way through the summer reading list when Lord of the Flies brought me to a halt. I wasn’t ready to start another book when I finished that one. I’d never read anything so layered with meaning: it haunted me, and I needed to think about it some more. But I didn’t want to spend the whole break doing nothing but reading and watching TV. Junior was happy shooting baskets all the daylight hours, but there wasn’t much else going on around the projects if you were too old for the playground and not into drugs. Orchard Beach still beckoned, roasting traffic and all, but getting there was a trek you couldn’t make every day. Besides, without Abuelita’s laugh and the anticipation of her overgenerous picnic in the trunk, without Gallego gunning the engine of a car packed with squirming kids, somehow it just wasn’t the same.
 
So I decided to get a job. Mami and Titi Carmen were sitting in Abuelita’s kitchen over coffee when I announced my plan. There were no shops or businesses in the projects, but maybe I could find someone to hire me in Abuelita’s old neighborhood. Titi Carmen still lived on Southern Boulevard and worked nearby at United Bargains. The momandpop stores under the El wouldn’t hire kids—leaning on family labor rather than paying a stranger—but the bigger retailers along Southern Boulevard might. I proposed to walk down the street and inquire in each one. “Don’t do that,” said Titi Carmen. “Let me ask Angie.” Angie was Titi Carmen’s boss.
 
My mother meanwhile looked stricken and bit her lip. She didn’t say anything until Titi had gone home. Then, for the first time, she told me a little bit about her own childhood: about sewing and ironing handkerchiefs for Titi Aurora since before she could remember, for hours every day. “I resented it, Sonia. I don’t want you to grow up feeling like I did.” She went on to apologize for being unable to buy us more things but still insisted it would be even worse if I blamed her one day for depriving me of a childhood.
I didn’t see that coming. Nobody was forcing me to work. Sure, a little pocket money would be nice, but that wasn’t the main motivation. “Mami, I want to work,” I told her. She’d worked too hard all her life to appreciate that leisure could mean boredom, but that’s what I knew I’d be facing if I sat home all summer. I promised never to blame her. In that moment, I began to understand how hard my mother’s life had been.
 
Titi Carmen reported back that Angie was willing to hire me for a dollar an hour. That was less than minimum wage, but since I wasn’t old enough to work legally anyway, they would just pay me off the books. I would take the bus, meet Titi Carmen at her place, and then we’d walk over to United Bargains together. That became our routine. It wasn’t a neighborhood where you walked alone.
 
United Bargains sold women’s clothing. I pitched in wherever needed: restocking, tidying up, monitoring the dressing rooms. I was supposed to watch for the telltale signs of a shoplifter trying to disappear behind the racks, rolling up merchandise to stuff in a purse.
 
Junkies were especially suspect. They were easy to spot by the shadow in their eyes, though the tracks on their arms were hidden under long sleeves even in summer. There was never an argument, never a scene. Once in a while I had to say, “Take it out.” Most of the time I didn’t need to utter a word. She would pull the garment out of her bag, put it back on the hanger, or maybe hand it to me, our eyes never meeting as she slinked out. We always let them go. There wasn’t much choice: in a precinct that had come to be known as Fort Apache, the Wild West, the cops had their hands full dealing with the gangs. Besides, the management understood that the shame and pity were punishment enough, and I naturally agreed. I abhorred feeling pitied, that degrading secondhand sadness I would always associate with my family’s reaction to the news I had diabetes. To pity someone else feels no better. When someone’s dignity shatters in front of you, it leaves a hole that any feeling heart naturally wants to fill, if only with its own sadness.
 
On Saturday nights the store was open late, and it was dark by the time we rolled down the gates. Two patrol officers would meet us at the door and escort us home. I don’t know how this was arranged, whether it was true that one of the saleswomen was sleeping with one of these cops, but I was glad of it anyway. As we walked, we could see the SWAT team on the roofs all along Southern Boulevard, their silhouettes bulging with body armor, assault rifles bristling. One by one the shops would darken, and we could hear the clatter of the graffiti-covered gates being rolled down, trucks driving off, until we were the only ones walking. Even the prostitutes had vanished. You might trip on tourniquets and empty glassine packets when you got into the courtyard area at Titi Carmen’s, but you wouldn’t run into any neighbors. I would spend the night there, talking the night away with Miriam. I wished Nelson were there too, but he was never home anymore.
 
I remember falling asleep thinking again about Lord of the Flies. It was as if the fly-crusted sow’s head on a stick were planted in a crack of the sidewalk on Southern Boulevard. The junkies haunting the alley were little boys smeared with war paint, abandoned on a hostile island, and the eyes of the hunters cruising slowly down the street glowed with primitive appetites. The cops in their armor were only a fiercer tribe. Where was the conch?
 
The next morning, in daylight, Southern Boulevard was less threatening. The street vendors were out, shop fronts were open, people were coming and going. On the way home I stopped at a makeshift fruit cart to buy a banana for a snack. I was standing there peeling my purchase when a police car rolled up to the curb. The cop got out and pointed here and there to what he wanted—there was a language barrier—and the vendor loaded two large shopping bags with fruit. The cop made as if to reach for his wallet, but it was only a gesture, and the vendor waved it off. When the cop drove away, I asked the man why he didn’t take the money.
 
Es el precio de hacer negocios. If I don’t give the fruit, I can’t sell the fruit.”
 
My heart sank. I told him I was sorry it was like that.
 
“We all have to make a living,” he said with a shrug. He looked more ashamed than aggrieved.
 
Why was I so upset? Without cops our neighborhood would be even more of a war zone than it was. They worked hard at a dangerous job with little thanks from the people they protected. We needed them. Was I angry because I held the police to a higher standard, the same way I did Father Dolan and the nuns?
 
There was something more to it, beyond the betrayal of trust, beyond the corruption of someone whose uniform is a symbol of the civic order.
 
How do things break down? In Lord of the Flies, the more mature of those lost boys start off with every intention of building a moral, functional society on their island, drawing on what they remember—looking after the “littluns,” building the shelters, keeping the signal fire burning. Their little community gradually breaks down all the same, battered by those who are more self-indulgent, those who are driven by ego and fear.
 
Which side was the cop on?
 
The boys need rules, law, order, to keep their worst instincts in check. The conch they blow to call a meeting or hold for the right to speak stands for order, but it holds no power in itself. Its only power is what they agree to honor. It is a beautiful thing, but fragile.
 
When I was much younger, on summer days I would sometimes go along with Titi Aurora to the place where she worked as a seamstress. Those must have been days when Mami was working the day shift and, for some reason, I couldn’t go to Abuelita’s. That room with the sewing machines whirring was a vision of hell to me: steaming hot, dark, and airless, with the windows painted black and the door shut tight. I was too young to be useful, but I tried to help anyway, to pass the time. Titi Aurora would give me a box of zippers to untangle, or I’d stack up hangers, sort scraps by color, or fetch things for the women sewing. All day long I’d keep an eye out for anyone heading toward the door. As soon as it opened, I’d race over and stick my head out for a breath of air, until Titi saw me and shooed me back in. I asked her why they didn’t just keep the door open. “They just can’t,” she would say.
 
Behind the closed door and the blackened windows, all those women were breaking the law. But they weren’t criminals. They were just women toiling long hours under miserable conditions to support their families. They were doing what they had to do to survive. It was my first inkling of what a tough life Titi Aurora had had. Titi never got the schooling that Mami got, and she’d borne the brunt of the father Mami was spared from knowing. Her married life would have many challenges and few rewards. Work was the only way she knew to keep going, and she never missed a day. And though Titi was also the most honest person I knew—if she found a dime in a pay phone, she’d dial the operator to ask where she should mail it—she broke the law every day she went to work.
 
One evening at United Bargains, the women were making crank calls, dialing random numbers out of the phone book. If a woman’s voice answered, they acted as if they were having an affair with her husband, then howled with laugh...

Revue de presse

“A compelling and powerfully written memoir about identity and coming of age…If the outlines of Justice Sotomayor’s life are well known by now, her searching and emotionally intimate memoir, My Beloved World, nonetheless has the power to surprise and move the reader…This account of her life is revealing, keenly observed and deeply felt…This insightful memoir underscores just how well Justice Sotomayor mastered the art of narrative. It’s an eloquent and affecting testament to the triumph of brains and hard work over circumstance, of a childhood dream realized through extraordinary will and dedication.”
            —Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

"The book delivers on its promise of intimacy in its depictions of Sotomayor's family, the corner of Puerto Rican immigrant New York where she was raised and the link she feels to the island where she spent childhood summers …This is a woman who knows where she comes from and has the force to bring you there. Sotomayor does this by being cleareyed about the flaws of the adults who raised her—she lets them be complicated…'I've spent my whole life learning how to do things that were hard for me,' Sotomayor tells an acquaintance when he asks whether becoming a judge will be difficult for her. Yes, she has. And by the time you close My Beloved World, you understand how she has mastered judging, too."
            —Emily Bazelon, The New York Times Book Review
 
"With buoyant humor and thoughtful candor, she recounts her rise from a crime-infested neighborhood in the South Bronx to the nation's highest court. 'I will be judged as a human being by what readers find here,' Sotomayor writes. We, the jury in this case, find her irresistible."
            —John Wilwol, Washingtonian
 
"Sotomayor turns out to be a writer of depth and literary flair…My Beloved World is steeped in vivid memories of New York City, and it is an exceptionally frank account of the challenges that she faced during her ascent from a public housing project to the court's marble palace on First Street."
            —Adam Liptak, The New York Times
 
"You'll see in Sotomayor a surprising wealth of candor, wit, and affection. No topic is off limits, not her diabetes, her father's death, her divorce, or her cousin's death from AIDS. Put the kettle on, reader, it's time for some real talk with Titi Sonia…The author shines in her passages on childhood, family, and self-discovery. Her magical portraits of loved ones bring to mind Sandra Cisneros's The House on Mango Street; both authors bring a sense of childlike wonder and empathy to a world rarely seen in books, a Latin-American and womancentric world."
            —Grace Bello, Christian Science Monitor
 
“This is a page-turner, beautifully written and novelistic in its tale of family, love and triumph. It hums with hope and exhilaration. This is a story of human triumph.”
             —Nina Totenberg, NPR

"Big-hearted…A powerful defense of empathy…She has spent her life imagining her way into the hearts of everyone around her…Anyone wondering how a child raised in public housing, without speaking English, by an alcoholic father and a largely absent mother could become the first Latina on the Supreme Court will find the answer in these pages. It didn't take just a village: It took a country."
            —Dahlia Lithwick, The Washington Post
 
My Beloved World” is filled with inspiring, and surprisingly candid, stories about how the Supreme Court’s first Hispanic justice overcame a troubled childhood to attend Princeton and Yale Law School, eventually earning a seat on the nation’s highest court.”
           —Carla Main, Wall Street Journal    

"Remarkable…A portrait of a genuinely interesting person."
            —Michael Tomasky, Daily Beast
 
"In a refreshing conversational style, Sotomayor tells her fascinating life story with the hope of providing “comfort, perhaps even inspiration” to others, particularly children, who face hard times. “People who live in difficult circumstances,” Sotomayor writes in her preface, “need to know that happy endings are possible."
            —Jay Wexler, Boston Globe
 
"Classic Sotomayor: intelligent, gregarious and at times disarmingly personal…A portrait of an underprivileged but brilliant young woman who makes her way into the American elite and does her best to reform it from the inside…I certainly hope My Beloved World inspires readers to chase their dreams."
            —Jason Farago, NPR

“Vital, loving, and incisive…In this revealing memoir, Supreme Court Justice Sotomayor candidly and gracefully recounts her formative years. Her memoir shows both her continued self-reliance and her passion for community.”
            —Library Journal (Starred review)
 
“Justice Sotomayor recounts numerous obstacles and remarkable achievements in this personal and inspiring autobiography…Readers across the board will be moved by this intimate look at the life of a justice.”
            —Publishers Weekly
 
“Amazingly candid… an intimate and honest look at her extraordinary life and the support and blessings that propelled her forward.” 
            —Booklist (Starred review)
 
“Graceful, authoritative memoir…Mature, life-affirming musings from a venerable life shaped by tenacity and pride.”
            —Kirkus Reviews

Détails sur le produit


En savoir plus sur l'auteur

Découvrez des livres, informez-vous sur les écrivains, lisez des blogs d'auteurs et bien plus encore.

Commentaires en ligne 

5 étoiles
0
3 étoiles
0
2 étoiles
0
1 étoiles
0
4.0 étoiles sur 5
4.0 étoiles sur 5
Commentaires client les plus utiles
4.0 étoiles sur 5 UNDAUNTED COURAGE 15 avril 2013
Format:Format Kindle
Lindsay

j'arrive au bout d'un livre anglais sur mon Kindle 2, le système me demande automatiquement une note et une évalua

Ce que je fais bien volunteer

WHAT does it take to become a judge at the Supreme Court when you are born in a family of Puerto Rican ascent, when you spend your early childhood in a tenement in the Bronx and when you are diagnosed with a diabetes at age seven ?
The answer is: a lot of courage and determination. I love this book because of its central message: yes, you can beat the odds. With a lot of help and love from your family and your community.

Mais vous comprendrez sans peine que je ne peux pas systématiquement donner mon avis en anglais ET en français sur tous les articles achetés sur Amazon. N'ayant pas xsa à faire, je m'en tiens pour l'instant au commentaire anglais.
(Je ne suis pas salarié de la boîte après tout ).
Si vous souhaitez un double commentaire, je vous suggère de prévoir un BUDGET AD HOC !
Avec mes salutations empressées.
C.N. ancien maître de conférences à la Sorbonne nouvelle
Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ?
Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 étoiles sur 5  1.553 commentaires
107 internautes sur 117 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Engaging Read 4 février 2013
Par Chic - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
Full disclosure, I am a lawyer, so I have perhaps an above average interest in Sonia Sotomayor. Prior to reading this book, I did not know much about her, and I thought this would be a good opportunity to learn more. On the whole, I enjoyed this book. I was not a fan of the writing style. I suppose it was meant to be conversational, but I found it a bit stilted at times and overly formal. I find any reviews that this book is not heavy enough on Justice Sotomayor's legal doctrine laughable. One, it is a memoir. Two, she is clear in her preface that she will not be covering that topic. Three, the books stops when she is appointed to the federal bench in 1992. If you want to know a Supreme Court Justice's doctrine, read through their opinions, concurrences and dissents. Don't look to a memoir that focuses mostly on her coming of age and early years as an attorney.

The book was engaging, and really demonstrates what hard work can accomplish. As she notes, she may not have been qualified when she made it to certain points in her life, but she worked her tail off to show that she was more than deserving, which can be seen by all types of objective achievements. I particularly enjoyed the sections of the book that discussed her work at the DA's office. If I had one major complaint, it would be that she was a tad bit too self-congratulatory. That could be my own stereotypes speaking, however! I have to push myself to decide whether I would feel the same way if she were a man. The fact is that she has accomplished more than most people can dream of, with far fewer tools. That can only come from intelligence, hard work and savvy, which she certainly should feel proud about. Good, quick read for anyone looking to learn more about Justice Sotomayor.
39 internautes sur 42 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Some Interesting and Highly Worthwhile Lessons 26 janvier 2013
Par Ronald H. Clark - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié|Achat vérifié
I did not quite know what to expect regarding this memoir by Justice Sotomayor of her pre-judicial life. As a student of the Court for 40 years or so, a lawyer for 35 years, and a trained political scientist, I have found judicial biographies and the few judicial memoirs highly insightful into the character and actions of particular Justices. Justice Sotomayor is certainly the least known of the current Court, at least to me, and I was pleasantly surprised how absolutely candid her book is. It tells one a great deal about her, her background, and her character. The only other candid and insightful memoir that compares with this one is Justice Thomas' "My Grandfather's Son," distinctive for its remarkable honesty and perspective on his thinking and the factors that shaped it. A number of her topics stand out:

First, she affords the reader a remarkable perspective on affirmative action, which she readily admits touched upon her own life in terms of Princeton, Yale Law, and her selection as a U.S. District Judge. Her attitude is much more supportive of the concept than Thomas was in his sometimes angry discussion of the issue in his book. Sotomayor places emphasis upon affirmative action as providing an opportunity to work very hard, unbelievably hard, and to demonstrate what your true capabilities are. She discusses this concept several times at different stages of her book, and I am very appreciative for helping to develop my thinking on this important issue.

Second, I found her story most fascinating because it is, in microcosm, the story of Puerto Rican challenges in Hispanic New York. I knew very little about this culture before reading the book. But throughout, elements of Puerto Rican life pop up; and I was pleased that the author uses many Spanish names and expressions, which facilitates the reader's introduction to this rich culture. Sotomayor has included a glossary of Spanish terms and expressions which is quite helpful. The challenges that Sotomayor faced, and faced successfully, are immense. And it is important to understand this dimensions of the Puerto Rican experience.

For those contemplating a legal career, the book affords important insights. As a retired law firm partner, I was particularly interested in the narrative of her progression from being an Assistant D.A. in New York, to becoming a law firm associate and later partner, and finally her initial judicial appointment. Since this was all new to Sotomayor, she shares her reactions to each step in a way that educates the reader as to the challenges in following such a course.

Finally, I was delighted with how candidly she discusses her type I diabetes and how this has impacted (and continues to impact) her life. Since we currently have some manner of epidemic underway, with many victims unaware of their condition, such discussion is critically important. I speak from my own experience.

There are many other "pluses" I could discuss, but these are the major points that struck me. I should add that she emerges as one tough character; a trait I am sure she relies upon frequently in interacting with some of her forceful Court brethren. For this, I am extremely thankful. Surely, Sotomayor has a healthy ego, but after reading this remarkable memoir, one can only conclude she has earned it.
128 internautes sur 152 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Speak, Memory 15 janvier 2013
Par Robert Taylor Brewer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
Memoirs today come out of a black hole, many of them tainted by allusions to fact later revealed to be the heady stuff of fiction. It has happened so often the genre, it seems, doesn't know what it wants to be. So it is refreshing right out of the box to run into the preface of Justice Sotomayor, who lays down her rules for writing...rules of engagement, as it were. She takes as firm a stand as we are likely to read against blended characters, and a reader gets the impression there isn't going to be a recall of this book, a retraction, let alone a major scandal involving facts that turn out to be chimera. Considering the disasters we've come to expect from memoir, it's a great start.

I winced when the Justice gave herself an insulin injection on 60 Minutes; the incident repeats itself in the opening chapter, one that it reads more like a Dennis Lehane sequence, and the only thing keeping it from continuing on in this manner are the interjections, the lessons of a lived life, that every so often bubble up and infuse the text with didactic mannerisms. But even with them, the text flows easily, readers are engulfed in the lustrous prose because the language is steeped in verisimilitude with its seances, Abuelita and bisabuela, the neuropathy of a father bathed in alcoholism - the characters all alive, vivid, and brilliantly real. At some moments, you could be in the magical world of Marquez, as in: "vines snaked under iron fences and up balustrades. Chickens scrabbled under hibiscus bushes and bright yellow canario flowers. I watched the afternoon rains pour down like a curtain...". In other places, the regret of Joan Didion: "ballet class was a brief torture."

Justice Sotomayor had the ability to study with the TV on, and although many consider TV a wasteland, Perry Mason and Burger the prosecutor rose up to cast their influence. It's believable because it happened to many of us (Lieutenant Tragg was my favorite). Then came career influences: Princeton and Yale seem like so much playtime, until the case of Richard Maddicks, New York's infamous Tarzan murderer. Here the writing itself changes; morphs into something out of an Elmore Leonard novel, except that it's a real case, and probably one of the reasons the Justice was so convincing when she told 60 Minutes she had seen true evil.

Charming, chilling and powerful, all at the same time.
35 internautes sur 40 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
3.0 étoiles sur 5 In all, I would recommend the book to anyone who. like me, admires the Judge. 28 janvier 2013
Par Carlos T. Mock - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié|Achat vérifié
My beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor, Spanglish Edition

Whenever I review a famous person biography - or "memoir" as the Justice has decided to call it - I try to think how the book would read if the person writing it would be an ordinary person.

The book opens with the Justice's diagnosis of juvenile diabetes at age 7 - "not yet 8" - and how Sonia learns how to give her insulin shots to stop her parents from fighting about it. We see a little girl who lives in the the projects of the Bronx, raised by an alcoholic father - Juan Luis or Juli - and a nurse - Celina - who are constantly fighting. Her father dies soon after the beginning of the book, and we see Sonia raised in an extended family which includes her grandmother - abuelita Mercedes - and lots of aunts, uncles, and cousins. Sonia's best friends are her immediate family and her comfort and support are drawn from it.

I found this part of the book to be quite endearing - a la Junot Díaz way - with multiple use of Spanish words and phrases to remind the reader of the Justice's background and culture. However as we move past Cardinal Spellman High School and on to Princeton and Yale Law School, the book changes in tone. The Spanish words and phrases diminish in frequency, and the reader is presented with the more professional side of the Justice.

This second half of the book I found tedious and boring. It becomes more of a who's who in the Justice personal life. The Justice apologizes in her introduction: "If particular friends or family members find themselves not mentioned...I hope they will understand that the needs of a clear and focused telling must outweigh even an abundance of feeling." It almost felt that if you were famous and she knew you, she would drop his or her name to add flare to the narrative. i didn't like it - I felt it drew flare away from her....

I also wondered why the Justice found herself defending her admissions to Princeton and Yale Law School. Her constant defense and justification of minority quotas and her insecurities as to why she was admitted to both schools are not necessary; after all, she's a Justice of the Supreme Court - case closed!

Her work as assistant D. A. in New York, the cases she tried, and then her take at the Pavia and Hartcourt law firm, and finally her appointment to the District Court Judge for the South District of NY - where the book abruptly ends - are not as fun to read. And, yes, I was disappointed that the Justice did not include her story as to how she was appointed to the Supreme Court. As much as I admire and like the Judge, I think it would have made a much better read, given who she is, and why we're reading her story.

The book is very well edited; the narrative is from the first person universal point if view; which is what I would expect in any a biography. After all, we're seeing the world through Sonia Sotomayor's point of view. The Glossary is a nice feature.

In all, I would recommend the book to anyone who. like me, admires the Judge.
21 internautes sur 24 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 An Extraordinary Memoir 3 février 2013
Par Middle-aged Professor - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
The law is my profession, and I have great familiarity with both the Supreme Court and many of the other places Sonia Sotomayor worked and studied, and my cynical side kept me from having much interest reading her life story titled "My Beloved World." I mean, come on. Really? The great reviews and its relevance to my work eventually moved me to give it a reluctant try. Wow. Put my cynicism on the shelf: this is a fantastic and fascinating memoir. Sotomayor is stunningly revealing about her emotional and intellectual growth and experiences, well beyond the norm of a memoir of a political figure in power. The force of her tale, though, also comes from the skill of her writing. The story of her life is tightly constructed, filled with anecdote and reflection, but always to a purpose, and never indulges in maudlin sentimentality or false modesty. This sort of writing is completely different from that required of a judge or a litigator, and her skill is truly impressive.

Her rags-to-glory story has many fascinating takeaways, including her culture, her family, dealing with an alcoholic father, barriers to women, diabetes. . . and much more. There were two big ones, though, for me. First, was the application of her story to affirmative action and racism. Her stories from Princeton, Yale and the practice of law explode so many of the myths exploited by those who think the need is past and speak to many issues, including the value of diversity. As the Court faces the possibility (again) of declaring affirmative action unconstitutional, this honest presentation of one story underscores its importance and value in a way that the opinions in the case surely will not --- they will seem hollow and out-of-touch in comparison. Second, was her willingness throughout her life to admit to herself what she didn't know (yet). When presented with others who exceeded her knowledge and ability in any area, rather than acting defensively, she would seek out their knowledge and advice. She studies both friends and mentors for what she can learn from them and, by dint of will and effort, keeps growing and learning. It takes both drive and a deep level of secure self-esteem to follow this course, and this aspect of her story alone is highly inspirational.
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ?   Dites-le-nous
Rechercher des commentaires
Rechercher uniquement parmi les commentaires portant sur ce produit

Discussions entre clients

Le forum concernant ce produit
Discussion Réponses Message le plus récent
Pas de discussions pour l'instant

Posez des questions, partagez votre opinion, gagnez en compréhension
Démarrer une nouvelle discussion
Thème:
Première publication:
Aller s'identifier
 

Rechercher parmi les discussions des clients
Rechercher dans toutes les discussions Amazon
   


Rechercher des articles similaires par rubrique