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No Logo (en anglais) [Anglais] [Broché]

Naomi Klein
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Description de l'ouvrage

17 mai 2001 Roman
There's a bad mood rising against the corporate brands. No Logo is the warning on the label.

Once a poster boy for the new economy, Bill Gates has become global whipping boy. Nike's swoosh - the marketing success of the nineties - is now equated with sweatshop labour, and teenage MacDonald's workers are joining the Teamsters. What is going on? No Logo, an incisive and insightful report from the frontlines of mounting backlash against multinational corporations, explains why some of the most revered brands in the world are finding themselves on the wrong end of a bottle of spray paint, a computer hack, or an international anti-corporate campaign.

No Logo uncovers a betrayal of the central promises of the information age: choice, interactivity, and increased freedom. And as job security disappears, the respectful reverence which corporations enjoyed as engines of the economy is also dissipating - as is their protection from worker and citizen rage.

Equal parts cultural analysis, political manifesto, mall-rat memoir, and journalistic exposé, No Logo is the first book to put the new resistance into pop-historical and clear economic perspective. Naomi Klein tells a story of rebellion and self-determination in the face of our new branded world.
--Ce texte fait référence à une édition épuisée ou non disponible de ce titre.

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Extrait

NEW BRANDED WORLD

As a private person, I have a passion for landscape, and I have never seen one improved by a billboard. Where every prospect pleases, man is at his vilest when he erects a billboard. When I retire from Madison Avenue, I am going to start a secret society of masked vigilantes who will travel around the world on silent motor bicycles, chopping down posters at the dark of the moon. How many juries will convict us when we are caught in these acts of beneficent citizenship? — David Ogilvy, founder of the Ogilvy & Mather advertising agency, in Confessions of an Advertising Man, 1963

The astronomical growth in the wealth and cultural influence of multinational corporations over the last fifteen years can arguably be traced back to a single, seemingly innocuous idea developed by management theorists in the mid-1980s: that successful corporations must primarily produce brands, as opposed to products.

Until that time, although it was understood in the corporate world that bolstering one's brand name was important, the primary concern of every solid manufacturer was the production of goods. This idea was the very gospel of the machine age. An editorial that appeared in Fortune magazine in 1938, for instance, argued that the reason the American economy had yet to recover from the Depression was that America had lost sight of the importance of making things:

This is the proposition that the basic and irreversible function of an industrial economy is the making of things; that the more things it makes the bigger will be the income, whether dollar or real; and hence that the key to those lost recuperative powers lies ... in the factory where the lathes and the drills and the fires and the hammers are. It is in the factory and on the land and under the land that purchasing power originates [italics theirs].

And for the longest time, the making of things remained, at least in principle, the heart of all industrialized economies. But by the eighties, pushed along by that decade's recession, some of the most powerful manufacturers in the world had begun to falter. A consensus emerged that corporations were bloated, oversized; they owned too much, employed too many people, and were weighed down with too many things. The very process of producing — running one's own factories, being responsible for tens of thousands of full-time, permanent employees — began to look less like the route to success and more like a clunky liability.

At around this same time a new kind of corporation began to rival the traditional all-American manufacturers for market share; these were the Nikes and Microsofts, and later, the Tommy Hilfigers and Intels. These pioneers made the bold claim that producing goods was only an incidental part of their operations, and that thanks to recent victories in trade liberalization and labor-law reform, they were able to have their products made for them by contractors, many of them overseas. What these companies produced primarily were not things, they said, but images of their brands. Their real work lay not in manufacturing but in marketing. This formula, needless to say, has proved enormously profitable, and its success has companies competing in a race toward weightlessness: whoever owns the least, has the fewest employees on the payroll and produces the most powerful images, as opposed to products, wins the race.

And so the wave of mergers in the corporate world over the last few years is a deceptive phenomenon: it only looks as if the giants, by joining forces, are getting bigger and bigger. The true key to understanding these shifts is to realize that in several crucial ways — not their profits, of course — these merged companies are actually shrinking. Their apparent bigness is simply the most effective route toward their real goal: divestment of the world of things. Since many of today's best-known manufacturers no longer produce products and advertise them, but rather buy products and "brand" them, these companies are forever on the prowl for creative new ways to build and strengthen their brand images. Manufacturing products may require drills, furnaces, hammers and the like, but creating a brand calls for a completely different set of tools and materials. It requires an endless parade of brand extensions, continuously renewed imagery for marketing and, most of all, fresh new spaces to disseminate the brand's idea of itself. In this section of the book, I'll look at how, in ways both insidious and overt, this corporate obsession with brand identity is waging a war on public and individual space: on public institutions such as schools, on youthful identities, on the concept of nationality and on the possibilities for unmarketed space.

The Beginning of the Brand

It's helpful to go back briefly and look at where the idea of branding first began. Though the words are often used interchangeably, branding and advertising are not the same process. Advertising any given product is only one part of branding's grand plan, as are sponsorship and logo licensing. Think of the brand as the core meaning of the modern corporation, and of the advertisement as one vehicle used to convey that meaning to the world.

The first mass-marketing campaigns, starting in the second half of the nineteenth century, had more to do with advertising than with branding as we understand it today. Faced with a range of recently invented products — the radio, phonograph, car, light bulb and so on — advertisers had more pressing tasks than creating a brand identity for any given corporation; first, they had to change the way people lived their lives. Ads had to inform consumers about the existence of some new invention, then convince them that their lives would be better if they used, for example, cars instead of wagons, telephones instead of mail and electric light instead of oil lamps. Many of these new products bore brand names — some of which are still around today — but these were almost incidental. These products were themselves news; that was almost advertisement enough.

The first brand-based products appeared at around the same time as the invention-based ads, largely because of another relatively recent innovation: the factory. When goods began to be produced in factories, not only were entirely new products being introduced but old products — even basic staples — were appearing in strikingly new forms. What made early branding efforts different from more straightforward salesmanship was that the market was now being flooded with uniform mass-produced products that were virtually indistinguishable from one another. Competitive branding became a necessity of the machine age — within a context of manufactured sameness, image-based difference had to be manufactured along with the product.

So the role of advertising changed from delivering product news bulletins to building an image around a particular brand-name version of a product. The first task of branding was to bestow proper names on generic goods such as sugar, flour, soap and cereal, which had previously been scooped out of barrels by local shopkeepers. In the 1880s, corporate logos were introduced to mass-produced products like Campbell's Soup, H.J. Heinz pickles and Quaker Oats cereal. As design historians and theorists Ellen Lupton and J. Abbott Miller note, logos were tailored to evoke familiarity and folksiness (see Aunt Jemima, page 2), in an effort to counteract the new and unsettling anonymity of packaged goods. "Familiar personalities such as Dr. Brown, Uncle Ben, Aunt Jemima, and Old Grand-Dad came to replace the shopkeeper, who was traditionally responsible for measuring bulk foods for customers and acting as an advocate for products ... a nationwide vocabulary of brand names replaced the small local shopkeeper as the interface between consumer and product." After the product names and characters had been established, advertising gave them a venue to speak directly to would-be consumers. The corporate "personality," uniquely named, packaged and advertised, had arrived.

For the most part, the ad campaigns at the end of the nineteenth century and the start of the twentieth used a set of rigid, pseudoscientific formulas: rivals were never mentioned, ad copy used declarative statements only and headlines had to be large, with lots of white space — according to one turn-of-the-century adman, "an advertisement should be big enough to make an impression but not any bigger than the thing advertised."

But there were those in the industry who understood that advertising wasn't just scientific; it was also spiritual. Brands could conjure a feeling — think of Aunt Jemima's comforting presence — but not only that, entire corporations could themselves embody a meaning of their own. In the early twenties, legendary adman Bruce Barton turned General Motors into a metaphor for the American family, "something personal, warm and human," while GE was not so much the name of the faceless General Electric Company as, in Barton's words, "the initials of a friend." In 1923 Barton said that the role of advertising was to help corporations find their soul. The son of a preacher, he drew on his religious upbringing for uplifting messages: "I like to think of advertising as something big, something splendid, something which goes deep down into an institution and gets hold of the soul of it.... Institutions have souls, just as men and nations have souls," he told GM president Pierre du Pont. General Motors ads began to tell stories about the people who drove its cars — the preacher, the pharmacist or the country doctor who, thanks to his trusty GM, arrived "at the bedside of a dying child" just in time "to bring it back to life."

By the end of the 1940s, there was a burgeoning awareness that a brand wasn't just a mascot or a catchphrase or a ... --Ce texte fait référence à une édition épuisée ou non disponible de ce titre.

Revue de presse

"[Klein is] hard hitting--a keen observer of the mass culture of the 1990s."  - The Financial Post --Ce texte fait référence à une édition épuisée ou non disponible de ce titre.

Détails sur le produit

  • Broché: 512 pages
  • Editeur : Harpercollins; Édition : New Ed (17 mai 2001)
  • Collection : Roman
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 0006530400
  • ISBN-13: 978-0006530404
  • Dimensions du produit: 13 x 19,7 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 3.9 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (9 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 88.221 en Livres anglais et étrangers (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres anglais et étrangers)
  • Table des matières complète
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En savoir plus sur l'auteur

Journaliste, essayiste et réalisatrice, diplômée de la prestigieuse London School of Economics, Naomi Klein, née en 1970 au Canada, fait partie des penseurs les plus influents de la scène intellectuelle internationale. Elle est l'auteure du best-seller No Logo, traduit dans vingt-huit langues et devenu une référence incontournable dans le monde entier. No Logo offre un bilan d'une société issue de la mondialisation et du règne des marques ainsi que des nouveaux mouvements de résistance des citoyens.
Convaincue que seuls les enseignements dispensés par l'Histoire permettent à l'humanité de faire face au désarroi provoqué par les chocs, les crises et les traumatismes auxquels le monde ne cesse de se trouver confronté, Naomi Klein progresse dans son réquisitoire avec une détermination impressionnante afin d'éveiller les consciences et de prodiguer à ses contemporains d'authentiques outils de résistance pour faire pièce à la faillite programmée du politique.
Tout en dessinant une nouvelle éthique de l'investigation journalistique, La Stratégie du Choc s'affirme comme une lecture indispensable pour réévaluer les enjeux des temps présents et à venir, vis-à-vis desquels les citoyens du monde portent, ensemble, une responsabilité impossible à déléguer.
Best-seller international, traduit en vingt-sept langues, La Stratégie du Choc a valu à Naomi Klein de recevoir en février 2009 le prix Warwick.
Le documentaire inspiré de La Stratégie du choc et réalisé par Michael Winterbottom est sorti sur les écrans français au printemps 2010, il est parut au mois de septembre 2010 en DVD aux éditions Montparnasse.
Du même auteur, Actes Sud a déjà publié No Logo (2001 ; Babel n° 545) et Journal d'une combattante (2003 ; Babel n° 692).

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3.9 étoiles sur 5
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7 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 An Important Treatise 26 juillet 2001
Format:Broché
I believe the most important thing about this book, is that it does not simply rehash the "brands are evil" sort of anti-corporate dirt that has already received attention in recent publications. 'No Logo' does not, as is suggested in a review below, merely outline how scary and powerful the multinational corporations are. Rather, Klein's 'No Logo' takes this sort of discourse one step further, by outlining the wider democratic implications of globalisation. This also allows Klein to avoid a sense of futility in her descriptions of corporate earth - her humourous and incisive tone inspires the reader to become active, which I feel is particularly important in this critical economic crossroads, rather than pessimistic or suicidal.
'No Logo' is infinitely readable, entertaining and inspiring. It's one of those books that would, I feel, make the world a better place if everyone read it. That's my current mission, anyhow - it will be the default birthday present of the majority of my friends for the next year, at least.
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4 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 A Must-Read 26 juillet 2001
Format:Broché
For someone already interested in consumer culture and its potentially corrupting influence, I was naturally entranced by this book. Given that she was preaching to the converted, I found this book spellbinding and a page turner. She offers multiple compelling arguments in a level-headed, structured text which flies in the face of critics of consumer culture as being knee-jerk and unintelligent.
What I particularly liked is the way that she gently pointed out inherent paradoxes in her argument. Doing so by no means served to undermine her thesis. Rather, it demonstrated her grasp of complex consumer issues and her recognition that no one political philosophy can completely air-tight
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4.0 étoiles sur 5 No Logo - 10th anniversary 22 septembre 2012
Par Didier
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Fantastic book...too bad that the 10th anniversary is flawed with mistaken references to wrong pages...maybe because this is a new edition that contains a great new introduction from Ms. Klein. But the entire book contains 100% references to wrong pages (appendices, etc.). Too bad.
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 Indispensable 12 septembre 2012
Par Mac
Format:Broché
Ce livre est l'un des piliers des mouvements altermondialistes tant par les méthodes et les phénomènes exposés que par l'analyse des courants d'idées qui les soutiennent.
L'évolution du monde et le crise de 2008 ne sont que le prolongement des dérives déjà décrites dans cet ouvrage.

Précis et exhaustif, il démontre que dans le monde anglo-saxon l'initiative citoyenne est autrement plus vivace et dynamique qu'en Europe même si les résultats sont relatifs en termes d'efficacité.

Enfin, le niveau de langue anglaise est assez relevé et nécessite un bon niveau baccalauréat ou une première année d'anglais à l'université pour être appréhendé avec aisance.

Ouvrage à lire absolument et à faire connaître.
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5.0 étoiles sur 5 Pas de temps perdu/No wasted time 29 mars 2009
Format:Broché
Ce livre a révélé en moi l'altermondialiste dormant! Après l'avoir lu, vous ne serez peut être plus pareil. Mais en aucun cas vous n'aurez perdu votre temps.

If you read this book, you may become an adbuster. Anyway, reading it will not be a waste of time.
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