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Extrait

THE END



I open my eyes and don’t know where I am or who I am. Not all that unusual—I’ve spent half my life not knowing. Still, this feels different. This confusion is more frightening. More total.

I look up. I’m lying on the floor beside the bed. I remember now. I moved from the bed to the floor in the middle of the night. I do that most nights. Better for my back. Too many hours on a soft mattress causes agony. I count to three, then start the long, difficult process of standing. With a cough, a groan, I roll onto my side, then curl into the fetal position, then flip over onto my stomach. Now I wait, and wait, for the blood to start pumping.

I’m a young man, relatively speaking. Thirty-six. But I wake as if ninety-six. After three decades of sprinting, stopping on a dime, jumping high and landing hard, my body no longer feels like my body, especially in the morning. Consequently my mind doesn’t feel like my mind. Upon opening my eyes I’m a stranger to myself, and while, again, this isn’t new, in the mornings it’s more pronounced. I run quickly through the basic facts. My name is Andre Agassi. My wife’s name is Stefanie Graf. We have two children, a son and daughter, five and three. We live in Las Vegas, Nevada, but currently reside in a suite at the Four Seasons hotel in New York City, because I’m playing in the 2006 U.S. Open. My last U.S. Open. In fact my last tournament ever. I play tennis for a living, even though I hate tennis, hate it with a dark and secret passion, and always have.

As this last piece of identity falls into place, I slide to my knees and in a whisper I say: Please let this be over.

Then: I’m not ready for it to be over.

Now, from the next room, I hear Stefanie and the children. They’re eating breakfast, talking, laughing. My overwhelming desire to see and touch them, plus a powerful craving for caffeine, gives me the inspiration I need to hoist myself up, to go vertical. Hate brings me to my knees, love gets me on my feet.

I glance at the bedside clock. Seven thirty. Stefanie let me sleep in. The fatigue of these final days has been severe. Apart from the physical strain, there is the exhausting torrent of emotions set loose by my pending retirement. Now, rising from the center of the fatigue comes the first wave of pain. I grab my back. It grabs me. I feel as if someone snuck in during the night and attached one of those anti-theft steering wheel locks to my spine. How can I play in the U.S. Open with the Club on my spine? Will the last match of my career be a forfeit?

I was born with spondylolisthesis, meaning a bottom vertebra that parted from the other vertebrae, struck out on its own, rebelled. (It’s the main reason for my pigeon-toed walk.) With this one vertebra out of sync, there’s less room for the nerves inside the column of my spine, and with the slightest movement the nerves feel that much more crowded. Throw in two herniated discs and a bone that won’t stop growing in a futile effort to protect the damaged area, and those nerves start to feel downright claustrophobic. When the nerves protest their cramped quarters, when they send out distress signals, a pain runs up and down my leg that makes me suck in my breath and speak in tongues. At such moments the only relief is to lie down and wait. Sometimes, however, the moment arrives in the middle of a match. Then the only remedy is to alter my game—swing differently, run differently, do everything differently. That’s when my muscles spasm. Everyone avoids change; muscles can’t abide it. Told to change, my muscles join the spinal rebellion, and soon my whole body is at war with itself.

Gil, my trainer, my friend, my surrogate father, explains it this way: Your body is saying it doesn’t want to do this anymore.

My body has been saying that for a long time, I tell Gil. Almost as long as I’ve been saying it.

Since January, however, my body has been shouting it. My body doesn’t want to retire—my body has already retired. My body has moved to Florida and bought a condo and white Sansabelts. So I’ve been negotiating with my body, asking it to come out of retirement for a few hours here, a few hours there. Much of this negotiation revolves around a cortisone shot that temporarily dulls the pain. Before the shot works, however, it causes its own torments.

I got one yesterday, so I could play tonight. It was the third shot this year, the thirteenth of my career, and by far the most alarming. The doctor, not my regular doctor, told me brusquely to assume the position. I stretched out on his table, face down, and his nurse yanked down my shorts. The doctor said he needed to get his seven-inch needle as close to the inflamed nerves as possible. But he couldn’t enter directly, because my herniated discs and bone spur were blocking the path. His attempts to circumvent them, to break the Club, sent me through the roof. First he inserted the needle. Then he positioned a big machine over my back to see how close the needle was to the nerves. He needed to get that needle almost flush against the nerves, he said, without actually touching. If it were to touch the nerves, even if it were to only nick the nerves, the pain would ruin me for the tournament. It could also be life- changing. In and out and around, he maneuvered the needle, until my eyes filled with water.

Finally he hit the spot. Bull’s- eye, he said.

In went the cortisone. The burning sensation made me bite my lip. Then came the pressure. I felt infused, embalmed. The tiny space in my spine where the nerves are housed began to feel vacuum packed. The pressure built until I thought my back would burst.

Pressure is how you know everything’s working, the doctor said.

Words to live by, Doc.

Soon the pain felt wonderful, almost sweet, because it was the kind that you can tell precedes relief. But maybe all pain is like that.


MY FAMILY IS GROWING LOUDER. I limp out to the living room of our suite. My son, Jaden, and my daughter, Jaz, see me and scream. Daddy, Daddy! They jump up and down and want to leap on me. I stop and brace myself, stand before them like a mime imitating a tree in winter. They stop just before leaping, because they know Daddy is delicate these days, Daddy will shatter if they touch him too hard. I pat their faces and kiss their cheeks and join them at the breakfast table.

Jaden asks if today is the day.

Yes.

You’re playing?

Yes.

And then after today are you retire?

A new word he and his younger sister have learned. Retired. When they say it, they always leave off the last letter. For them it’s retire, forever ongoing, permanently in the present tense. Maybe they know something I don’t.

Not if I win, son. If I win tonight, I keep playing.

But if you lose— we can have a dog?

To the children, retire equals puppy. Stefanie and I have promised them that when I stop training, when we stop traveling the world, we can buy a puppy. Maybe we’ll name him Cortisone.

Yes, buddy, when I lose, we will buy a dog.

He smiles. He hopes Daddy loses, hopes Daddy experiences the disappointment that surpasses all others. He doesn’t understand— and how will I ever be able to explain it to him?—the pain of losing, the pain of playing. It’s taken me nearly thirty years to understand it myself, to solve the calculus of my own psyche.

I ask Jaden what he’s doing today.

Going to see the bones.

I look at Stefanie. She reminds me she’s taking them to the Museum of Natural History. Dinosaurs. I think of my twisted vertebrae. I think of my skeleton on display at the museum with all the other dinosaurs. Tennis-aurus Rex.

Jaz interrupts my thoughts. She hands me her muffin. She needs me to pick out the blueberries before she eats it. Our morning ritual. Each blueberry must be surgically removed, which requires precision, concentration. Stick the knife in, move it around, get it right up to the blueberry without touching. I focus on her muffin and it’s a relief to think about something other than tennis. But as I hand her the muffin, I can’t pretend that it doesn’t feel like a tennis ball, which makes the muscles in my back twitch with anticipation. The time is drawing near.



AFTER BREAKFAST, after Stefanie and the kids have kissed me goodbye and run off to the museum, I sit quietly at the table, looking around the suite. It’s like every hotel suite I’ve ever had, only more so. Clean, chic, comfortable— it’s the Four Seasons, so it’s lovely, but it’s still just another version of what I call Not Home. The non-place we exist as athletes. I close my eyes, try to think about tonight, but my mind drifts backward. My mind these days has a natural backspin. Given half a chance it wants
to return to the beginning, because I’m so close to the end. But I can’t let it. Not yet. I can’t afford to dwell too long on the past. I get up and walk around the table, test my balance. When I feel fairly steady I walk gingerly to the shower.

Under the hot water I groan and scream. I bend slowly, touch my quads, start to come alive. My muscles loosen. My skin sings. My pores fly open. Warm blood goes sluicing through my veins. I feel something begin to stir. Life. Hope. The last drops of youth. Still, I make no sudden movements. I don’t want to do anything to startle my spine. I let my spine sleep in.

Standing at the bathroom mirror, toweling off, I stare at my face. Red eyes, gray stubble— a face totally different from the one with which I started. But also different from the one I saw last year in this same mirror. Whoever I might be, I’m not the boy who started this odyssey, and I’m not even the man who announced three months ago that the odyssey was coming to an end. I’m like a tennis racket on which I’ve replaced the grip four times and the strings seven times— is it accurate to call it the same racket? Somewhere in those eyes, however, I can still vaguely see the boy who didn’t want to play tennis in the first place, the boy who wanted to quit, the boy who did quit many times. I see that golden- haired boy who hated tennis, and I wonder how he would view this bald man, who still hates tennis and yet still plays. Would he be shocked? Amused? Proud? The question makes me weary, lethargic, and it’s only noon.

Please let this be over.

I’m not ready for it to be over.

The finish line at the end of a career is no different from the finish line at the end of a match. The objective is to get within reach of that finish line, because then it gives off a magnetic force. When you’re close, you can feel that force pulling you, and you can use that force to get across. But just before you come within range, or just after, you feel another force, equally strong, pushing you away. It’s inexplicable, mystical, these twin forces, these contradictory energies, but they both exist. I know, because I’ve spent much of my life seeking the one, fighting the other, and sometimes I’ve been stuck, suspended, bounced like a tennis ball
between the two.

Tonight: I remind myself that it will require iron discipline to cope with these forces, and whatever else comes my way. Back pain, bad shots, foul weather, self- loathing. It’s a form of worry, this reminder, but also a meditation. One thing I’ve learned in twenty-nine years of playing tennis: Life will throw everything but the kitchen sink in your path, and then it will throw the kitchen sink. It’s your job to avoid the obstacles. If you let them stop you or distract you, you’re not doing your job, and failing to do your job will cause regrets that paralyze you more than a bad back.

I lie on the bed with a glass of water and read. When my eyes get tired I click on the TV. Tonight, Round Two of the U.S. Open! Will this be Andre Agassi’s farewell? My face flashes on the screen. A different face than the one in the mirror. My game face. I study this new reflection of me in the distorted mirror that is TV and my anxiety rises another click or two.
Was that the final commercial? The final time CBS will ever promote one of my matches?

I can’t escape the feeling that I’m about to die.

It’s no accident, I think, that tennis uses the language of life. Advantage, service, fault, break, love, the basic elements of tennis are those of everyday existence, because every match is a life in miniature. Even the structure of tennis, the way the pieces fit inside one another like Russian nesting dolls, mimics the structure of our days. Points become games become sets become tournaments, and it’s all so tightly connected that any point can become the turning point. It reminds me of the way seconds become minutes become hours, and any hour can be our finest. Or darkest. It’s our choice.

But if tennis is life, then what follows tennis must be the unknowable void. The thought makes me cold.

Stefanie bursts through the door with the kids. They flop on the bed, and my son asks how I’m feeling.

Fine, fine. How were the bones?

Fun!

Stefanie gives them sandwiches and juice and hustles them out the door again.

They have a playdate, she says.

Don’t we all.

Now I can take a nap. At thirty- six, the only way I can play a late match, which could go past midnight, is if I get a nap beforehand. Also, now that I know roughly who I am, I want to close my eyes and hide from it. When I open my eyes, one hour has passed. I say aloud, It’s time. No more hiding. I step into the shower again, but this shower is different from the morning shower. The afternoon shower is always longer—twenty-two minutes, give or take— and it’s not for waking up or getting
clean. The afternoon shower is for encouraging myself, coaching myself.

Tennis is the sport in which you talk to yourself. No athletes talk to themselves like tennis players. Pitchers, golfers, goalkeepers, they mutter to themselves, of course, but tennis players talk to themselves—and answer. In the heat of a match, tennis players look like lunatics in a public square, ranting and swearing and conducting Lincoln-Douglas debates with their alter egos. Why? Because tennis is so damned lonely. Only boxers can understand the loneliness of tennis players—and yet boxers have their corner men and managers. Even a boxer’s opponent provides a kind of companionship, someone he can grapple with and grunt at. In tennis you stand face- to- face with the enemy, trade blows with him, but never touch him or talk to him, or anyone else. The rules forbid a tennis player from even talking to his coach while on the court. People sometimes mention the track-and-field runner as a comparably lonely figure, but I have to laugh. At least the runner can feel and smell his opponents. They’re inches away. In tennis you’re on an island. Of all the games men and women play, tennis is the closest to solitary confinement, which inevitably leads to self- talk, and for me the self-talk starts here in the afternoon shower. This is when I begin to say things to myself, crazy things, over and over, until I believe them. For instance, that a quasi-cripple can compete at the U.S. Open. That a thirty-six-year-old man can beat an opponent just entering his prime. I’ve won 869 matches in my career, fifth on the all-time list, and many were won during the afternoon shower.

With the water roaring in my ears— a sound not unlike twenty thousand fans—I recall particular wins. Not wins the fans would remember, but wins that still wake me at night. Squillari in Paris. Blake in New York. Pete in Australia. Then I recall a few losses. I shake my head at the disappointments. I tell myself that tonight will be an exam for which I’ve been studying twenty-nine years. Whatever happens tonight, I’ve already been through it at least once before. If it’s a physical test, if it’s mental, it’s nothing new.

Please let this be over.

I don’t want it to be over.

I start to cry. I lean against the wall of the shower and let go. --Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Relié .

Revue de presse

“Insightful [and] exceedingly well-written . . . [Open] has the cadence and plotting of a good novel . . . The raw energy and emotion throughout are pure Agassi.”
            -Newsday Top 10 Books of 2009
 
“Surprisingly candid . . . The baseline bad boy serves up his harrowing anecdotes with the same force he put behind every on-court ace.”
            -Entertainment Weekly 10 Best Nonfiction Books of 2009
 
“Bracingly devoid of triumphalist homily, Agassi’s is one of the most passionately anti-sports books ever written by a superstar athlete.”
            -The New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2009
 
“Andre Agassi’s memoir is just as entrancing as his tennis game . . . By sharing an unvarnished, at times inspiring story in an arresting, muscular style, Agassi may have just penned one of the best sports autobiographies of all time. Check—it’s one of the better memoirs out there, period.”
            -Sean Gregory, Time
 
“Not just a first-rate sports memoir but a genuine bildungsroman, darkly funny yet also anguished and soulful. It confirms what Agassi’s admirers sensed from the outset, that this showboat . . . was not clamoring for attention but rather conducting a struggle to wrest some semblance of selfhood from the sport that threatened to devour him.”
            -Sam Tanenhaus, The New York Times Book Review
 
“A remarkable and quite unexpected volume, one that sails well past its homiletic genre into the realm of literature, a memoir whose success clearly owes not a little to a reader’s surprise in discovering that a celebrity one may have presumed to know on the basis of that haircut and a few television commercials hawking cameras via the slogan ‘image is everything’ emerges as a man of parts—self-aware, black-humored, eloquent.”
            -Michael Kimmelman, The New York Review of Books
 
“[A] heartfelt memoir . . . Agassi’s style is open, all right, and his book, like so many of his tennis games, is a clear winner.”
            -O, The Oprah Magazine
 
Open describes [Agassi’s] personal odyssey with brio and unvarnished candor . . . His career-comeback tale is inspiring but even more so is another Open storyline. It could be called: The punk grows up . . . Countless athletes start charitable foundations, but frequently the organizations are just tax shelters or PR stunts. For Mr. Agassi helping others has instead become his life’s calling . . . Open is a superb memoir, but it hardly closes the books on an extraordinary life.”
            -Jay Winik, The Wall Street Journal
 
“It’s both astonishing and a pleasure to report that Andre Agassi . . . has produced an honest, substantive, insightful autobiography . . . The bulk of this extraordinary book vividly recounts a lost childhood, a Dickensian adolescence, and a chaotic struggle in adulthood to establish an identity . . . While not without excitement, Agassi’s comeback to No. 1 is less uplifting than his sheer survival, his emotional resilience, and his good humor in the face of the luckless cards he was often dealt.”
            -Michael Mewshaw, Washington Post
 
“Honest in a way that such books seldom are . . . An uncommonly well-written sports memoir.”
            -Charles McGrath, The New York Times
 
“Probably the most candid sports autobiography ever written . . . A remarkably real, tell-it-like-it-is, record-breaking read.”
            -Nancy Isenberg, The [Baton Rouge] Advocate
 
“Agassi weaves a fascinating tale of professional tennis and personal adversity . . . His tale shows that success is measured both on and off the court.”
            -Doree Shafrir, New York Post
 
 “Refreshingly candid . . . This lively, revealing, and entertaining book is certain to roil the tennis world and make a big splash beyond.”
            -Publishers Weekly
 
“Enigmatic tennis great Agassi lays it all on the line . . . Agassi’s photographic recall of pivotal matches evokes the raw intensity of watching them from the stands. Lovers of the sport will also appreciate this window into the mind of a champion . . . An ace of a tale about how one man found his game.”
            -Kirkus

--Ce texte fait référence à l'édition Relié .

Détails sur le produit

  • Broché: 500 pages
  • Editeur : PLON (8 décembre 2009)
  • Langue : Français
  • ISBN-10: 2259209424
  • ISBN-13: 978-2259209427
  • Dimensions du produit: 23,6 x 15,4 x 3,8 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 4.7 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (40 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 144.571 en Livres (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres)
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Commentaires en ligne

4.7 étoiles sur 5
4.7 étoiles sur 5
Commentaires client les plus utiles
7 internautes sur 7 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 L'envers du décor 1 mars 2010
Par Lola
Format:Relié
Je suis fan de tennis depuis les années 80.
J'ai donc suivi l'évolution d'André Agassi à travers les faibles retransmissions de matchs télévisés et magazines sportifs. J'ai admiré et soutenu ce tennisman, partagé ses joies et peines à chaque tournoi gagné ou perdu.

Mais ce livre m'a permis de connaître "l'envers du décor" : sa haine du tennis mais qui l'a porté toute sa vie, son combat contre le dragon (la machine de son père), le manque d'amour familial, sa perruque (qui n'est semble toute qu'un infime détail), sa sensibilité.

Mais malgré ses baisses de régime, ses envies de tout abandonner, la drogue, ses angoisses, ses souffrances et celles des autres, il s'est toujours relevé et a ouvert les yeux sur le monde, sur ceux qui souffrent aussi.

Félicitations à toute son équipe qui l'a entouré et soutenu. Ce fameux Gil et bien entendu Steffi.

Ce livre se lit très facilement, est très attachant et émouvant.
Il laisse une marque de beau respect des autres
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6 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Se lit comme un (bon) roman 6 février 2010
Format:Broché
J'ai vraiment dévoré ce bouquin
On y découvre les dessous, les difficultés, les angoisses et les joies du monde des sportifs de très haut niveau.
Les journalistes qui ont résumé cet ouvrage au seul détail de la perruque sont indignes. Cet épisode n'est qu'un détail.
Bien sûr il faut avoir un certain goût pour le sport pour lire cet ouvrage, mais j'y ai vraiment trouvé beaucoup de choses, et notamment une leçon de persévérance exemplaire.
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4 internautes sur 4 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Emouvant... 13 février 2010
Par Joelle54
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
J'ai autrefois beaucoup aimé et joué au tennis, regardé les champions s'affronter dans les grands événements, lu tout ce qu'on disait d'eux... A travers ce livre, j'ai revécu tous ces moments, me suis rappelée mes questionnements de l'époque, l'envie d'être à leur place mais aussi ce que je devinais des sacrifices qu'une telle vie représentait. Agassi n'a pas écrit un livre sur le tennis bien qu'il soit une toile de fond très présente et même si ce sport a indéniablement façonné d'une façon ou d'une autre l'homme qu'il est devenu. Il a pris le risque de raconter son parcours difficile, douloureux, compliqué, comment il avait peu à peu grandi sous les yeux des journalistes et de ses proches, sur et hors d'un cours de tennis. Sans concession sur lui et sur les autres, sans passer sous silence ses mauvais choix, ses maladresses, ses erreurs, sa responsabilité, ses forces aussi et les liens très forts qu'il a tissé avec un entourage qui l'a épaulé avec une fidélité sans faille. Il nous permet de comprendre mieux ce qu'il y avait derrière ses tenues pas toujours du meilleur goût ou sous sa perruque peu élégante ! Personnellement, j'aime beaucoup ce que j'y ai découvert.
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6 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Passionnant 28 décembre 2009
Par D. Lionel
Format:Broché
On voit l'envers du décor, les forces et les faiblesses d'un très grand sportif, attachant et porté vers les autres, avec des qualités humaines indéniables. On découvre comment se construit un mental de gagnant, avec son passé et pas contre lui. Il y a aussi plein d'anecdotes drôles, émouvantes ou politiquement incorrectes. C'est bien écrit et facile à lire.
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3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Le meilleur de la bio tennis 14 septembre 2012
Par Martin
Format:Poche
Open est à ce jour, pour moi, la meilleure biographie tennis jamais écrite. Riche en anecdotes sur le circuit, les autres joueurs et bien sûr sur André. Elle remémorera toute les émotions du passionné de tennis, les grands matchs de ces 20 dernières années, les joueurs qui ne sont plus là et qu'on aurait presque oubliés malgré leurs exploits. J'ai dévoré ce livre
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3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Vraiment chouette 4 juillet 2011
Par Gilles76
Format:Poche|Achat vérifié
Super livre, très honnête, plein de bonnes valeurs et surtout une histoire incroyable avec des descriptions de tournois de tennis très détaillées et intenses. Ce livre se lit très rapidement.
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3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Un livre enthousiasmant 16 mai 2010
Format:Broché
Je ne connais rien au tennis et n'avais aucune opinion sur Andre Agassi.

Je suis tombé sur le livre un peu par hasard et ai parcouru quelques pages machinalement (un échantillon gratuit sur mon Kindle), puis j'ai été obligé de l'acheter car je ne pouvais plus le lâcher. Je l'ai lu en deux jours et j'ai adoré.

C'est une très belle histoire, à la fois édifiante (son père est totalement cinglé), captivante et souvent émouvante.

Mention spéciale pour la scène de la rencontre entre le père d'Agassi et celui de Steffi Graff : c'est à mourir de rire.
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1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Etre ou paraitre? 17 février 2010
Par Colomba
Format:Broché
Si vous étiez comme moi dans les années 90 fan de tennis et forcément d'André Agssi, vous ne pourrez qu'aimer cette histoire attachante, sans complaisance (et atypique?) d'un champion "malgrès lui". Ce fil conducteur bien choisi "entre l'amour et la haine" nous emmène avec lui dans les moments les plus heureux, mais aussi les plus sombres de sa vie, les victoires, les défaites, les vérités, les mensonges....
Finalement l'important n'est pas ce que l'on vit mais la manière dont on le vit...
Mais même si vous êtes trop jeune pour avoir suivi la carrière de ce champion, je vous recommande cette histoire car elle traduit avant tout des sentiments humains dans lesquels nous pouvons tous nous retrouver. Parents, n'hésitez pas à le mettre dans les mains de vos ados!!!
Sait-on jamais qui l'on est???
En tous les cas, encore une belle victoire du champion avec ce premier ouvrage et toute mon admiration autant pour sa carrière tennistique que pour sa fondation...c'est aussi valable pour Steffie Graf/Agassi... bonne lecture à tous
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