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Pete Rose: An American Dilemma
 
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Pete Rose: An American Dilemma [Format Kindle]

Kostya Kennedy

Prix éditeur - format imprimé : EUR 20,99
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Descriptions du produit

Revue de presse

"A remarkable book about a fascinating, vexing figure." --Kirkus (starred review)

"Kennedy's ambitious account is an anecdote-rich read." --Publishers Weekly

"Kostya Kennedy has given us the real Pete Rose at last. Perhaps Pete does not deserve him, but baseball fans and readers who appreciate superb and subtle writing will be grateful." --David Maraniss

"Kennedy's book on the tarnished and enigmatic Rose is exceptional. Like the best writing about sport--Liebling, Angell--it qualifies as stirring literature. I'd read Kennedy no matter what he writes about." --Richard Ford

"This is a wonderful, clearly written book about a dark and complicated tragedy that continues to beset the purity of our national pastime. The whole story is here: the deeply talented, passionate ball player, 'Charlie Hustle,' and the deeply morally challenged hustler who bestrides essential questions about our national game." --Ken Burns

"Pete Rose is too rich a character to fit on a bronze plaque. He requires a good, trenchant, poignant (ah, Petey) book, and this is it." --Roy Blount Jr.

Présentation de l'éditeur

Pete Rose played baseball with a singular and headfirst abandon that endeared him to fans and peers, even as it riled others--a figure at once magnetic, beloved and polarizing. Rose has more base hits than anyone in history, yet he is not in the Hall of Fame. Twenty-five years ago he was banished from the game for gambling, then ruled ineligible for Cooperstown. Today, the question "Does Pete Rose belong in the Hall of Fame?" has evolved into perhaps the most provocative in sports, a layered, slippery and ever-relevant moral conundrum.

How do we evaluate the Hit King now, at a time when steroid cheats appear on the Hall of Fame ballot even as Rose is denied? What do we make of this happily unrepentant gambler, this shameless but beguiling showman whose post-baseball journey has led him to a curious reality show and to the streets of Cooperstown to hawk his signature, his story, himself?

Best-selling author Kostya Kennedy delivers an evocative answer in his fascinating re-examination of Pete Rose's life; from his cocky and charismatic early years through his storied playing career to his bitter war against baseball's hierarchy to the man we find today--still incorrigible, still adored by many. Where has his improbable saga landed him in the redefined, post-steroid world? Do we feel any differently about Pete Rose today? Should we?




“Kennedy's book on the tarnished and enigmatic Rose is exceptional. Like the best writing about sport-Liebling, Angell-it qualifies as stirring literature. I'd read Kennedy no matter what he writes about.” —Richard Ford

“Kostya Kennedy has given us the real Pete Rose at last. Perhaps Pete does not deserve him, but baseball fans and readers who appreciate superb and subtle writing will be grateful.” -David Maraniss

“This is a wonderful, clearly written book about a dark and complicated tragedy that continues to beset the purity of our national pastime. The whole story is here: the deeply talented, passionate ball player, 'Charlie Hustle,' and the deeply morally challenged hustler who bestrides essential questions about our national game.” -Ken Burns

“Pete Rose is too rich a character to fit on a bronze plaque. He requires a good, trenchant, poignant (ah, Petey) book, and this is it.” -Roy Blount Jr.

Kostya Kennedy is an assistant managing editor at Sports Illustrated and the New York Times bestselling author of 56: Joe DiMaggio and the Last Magic Number in Sports, winner of the 2011 Casey Award and runner-up for the 2012 PEN/ESPN Award for Literary Sports Writing. He lives with his wife and children in Westchester County, N.Y. For more, visit kostyakennedy.com


Détails sur le produit

  • Format : Format Kindle
  • Taille du fichier : 1071 KB
  • Nombre de pages de l'édition imprimée : 354 pages
  • Pagination - ISBN de l'édition imprimée de référence : 1618930966
  • Editeur : Sports Illustrated Books (11 mars 2014)
  • Vendu par : Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ASIN: B00HDSQR68
  • Synthèse vocale : Activée
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Amazon.com: 4.3 étoiles sur 5  117 commentaires
30 internautes sur 36 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 A Rose by Any Other Name 16 mars 2014
Par Roger D. Launius - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié|Commentaire client Vine pour produit gratuit (De quoi s'agit-il?)
Pete Rose is an icon, despite all that has happened to him over the years. A player more dedicated than talented he still reigns as the best there ever was. He is still the all time hits leader in MLB despite having been retired from the game for a quarter century. He was also a leader of men, providing the fiery energy needed for success on the Big Red Machine of the 1970s and the Phillies World Champion of 1980. At the same time he was a demon-haunted human being whose vices were just as overpowering as his virtues.

Kostya Kennedy tries to bring all of this into perspective in this new biography of one of baseball’s giants. We find out little new here, but it is well presented and convincingly argued. Yes, Rose had a lot of shady friends. Yes, he was an inveterate gambler, womanizer, all around jerk. Yes, he was a driven, single-minded performer on the sports stage. Yes, he broke rules, laws, and other conventions of society.

He also has the all-time Major League record for career base hits (4,256), games played (3,562), and at-bats (14,053). He has three World Champion rings, 1975 and 1976 with the Cincinnati Reds and 1980 with the Philadelphia Phillies. He was the National League Most Valuable Player in 1973, took three batting titles (1968, 1969, and 1973), and was a 17-time all star.

In every way imaginable, Pete Rose is one of the greatest players ever, emphasis on “ever,” in Major League Baseball. Yet he is not in the Hall of Fame and has been banned from the game life. His experience is tragic, polarizing, and evergreen. The author expends considerable effort to come to grips with the question of whether or not Rose should be banned from baseball and prohibited from induction in the Hall of Fame. I admit that I’m all for it. Someone got all of those hits and other accolades from his career. That person belongs in the Hall. That person is Pete Rose. He might have been less than successful at life, but he certainly was successful at baseball. If we barred entry to the Hall for all of those who failed in life but were great players I would have to throw out a bunch of Cooperstown enshrines starting with Ty Cobb and Rogers Hornsby and Babe Ruth. Kennedy pretty much shares those sentiments.

Rose’s situation is amplified by the steroid era in which many, many players nearing their time for consideration for the Hall of Fame are not banned from the process despite suspicions of their culpability in PED use. We’ll see what happens.
33 internautes sur 43 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 A VERY FINE BRIEF HISTORY 5 mars 2014
Par James L. Woolridge - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié|Commentaire client Vine pour produit gratuit (De quoi s'agit-il?)
I was raised in Greater Cincinnati, and raised through the Rose period. I am a Pete Rose supporter. Think he should be in the Hall of Fame. He has paid his penalty. That said...PETE ROSE An American Dilemma by Kostya Kennedy is a very fine effort, a short history of Pete Rose that covers his life without dwelling at any phase too long. It is easy to read and filled with great insight. Like another reviewer said, I read the book in one day. Interesting. Rose indeed is a dilemma, controversial and usually sets off arguments. Read this book, get the facts, then argue better whatever side you are on. There are a lot of books out there on Rose, this is one of the better ones. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED
20 internautes sur 26 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Steroid Era casts Pete Rose in a different light 9 mars 2014
Par Barry Sparks - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié|Commentaire client Vine pour produit gratuit (De quoi s'agit-il?)
Author Kostya Kennedy writes that "perhaps the most polarizing and provocative question in sports is, 'Does Pete Rose belong in the Hall of Fame?'" He says Rose is a figure who stirs uncommon passion, righteousness and indignation.

It's been more than 25 years since Rose has been banned from baseball for betting on baseball. And, in 1991 a 10-person special Hall of Fame committee was established with the idea of keeping Rose out of the Hall of Fame. The committee, termed "a sham" by sportswriter Jack Lang, passed a resolution that "Persons on the ineligible list can't be eligible candidates for the Hall of Fame." The resolution was later passed into the Hall of Fame's by-laws. Rose, however, was the only player the by-law applied to.

There's no question about Rose's on-the-field baseball credentials: the all-time hits leader with 4,256, an All-Star at five positions, the epitome of hustle and how to play the game the right way and The Sporting News' Player of the Decade for the 1970s.

San Francisco sportswriter Wells Twombley wrote, "A player like Pete Rose only comes along once in a lifetime."

Rose's off-the-field activities of gambling and womanizing (neither one of which he tried to hide) didn't endear him to some teammates or baseball officials. Rose had only two commandments in baseball and life: be on time and play hard.

The sudden death of Pete's father, Harry, in 1970 of a heart attack had a profound effect on him. Kennedy writes, "Pete would never again feel the accountability the way he felt to his dad. With his dad gone, Pete didn't care who he might disappoint."
Pete's sister added, "If Dad were still alive, Pete wouldn't have drifted and fallen like he has."

In the first two-thirds of the book, Kennedy recounts Rose's childhood and baseball career. Kennedy doesn't focus on The Dowd Report until page 190. John Dowd, who investigated Rose, says he regrets how the matter unfolded, and he wished that he and Rose had been able to discuss the matter man-to-man without the lawyers. He believes Rose might have admitted his guilt, accepted the consequences and eventually been eligible for the Hall of Fame.

Sportswriter Jack Lang said, "If Pete had admitted his crime, there would be a public demand he be eligible for the Hall of Fame."

Commissioner Fay Vincent believes Rose violated a cardinal baseball rule, but also a principle, a moral boundary. Vincent said, "Rose is a man without a moral compass."

The Steroid Era, however, has cast Rose in a different light. Kennedy writes, "Rose was banned for the incalculable damage he may have done to the foundation of the game. Steroid users are reviled for the damage they actually did."

Kennedy does an admirable job of recounting Rose's career and his impact on the game, capturing his personality and shortcomings and framing "the Pete Rose question." Although Rose violated a cardinal baseball rule and is ineligible for the Hall of Fame, it's nice to be reminded of Pete Rose, the baseball player. It makes his situtation, however, even sadder.
4 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 This Rose Has A Few Thorns 1 juillet 2014
Par A Customer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
The story of Pete Rose left me with mixed feelings about one of baseball's greatest players. No doubt his on the field accomplishments stand right up there with the best, but his addiction to gambling may have somewhat tarnished his image in some people's eyes to some degree that he not be put in the Hall of Fame.

Pete Rose was no doubt a leader when he was with the Reds and later with the Phillies. Charlie Hustle's physical and mental attitude towards the game is very unique, unlike a lot of ballplayers . He help set the standard as to how a ballplayer should play.

One forgets that ballplayers are all human, with human failings and feelings like the rest of us. Just like Hollywood stars, we put them on such a high pedestal, we don't want to see the dark side, so we just look away. We try to seperate the two, but I guess it is easier said than done, especially when one affects the other. And for me, that's where I am torn.

With steroid use being what it is, and certain ball players who cheated using other methods, who's to say what Rose did is any better or worse?? If you are going to put other players in the Hall of Fame who have cheated, in my opinion Pete Rose should be in there too. Either let them all in or let no one in. Pete Rose has paid his dues, as sad as that may sound considering the circumstances.

Thank you Kostya Kennedy for the wonderful yet sad look into one of baseball's great.
4 internautes sur 5 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Full disclosure: Kostya Kennedy was my editor for three years at Sports Illustrated. And he is my friend.... 6 juillet 2014
Par Tony C. Enthusiast, Fellow Writer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
Both his books are best-sellers, so he don't need no help from me. So, I will simply say this. As impressive as his Dimaggio book was, this is even better. Two reasons. First, like the most admirable kind of documentary, all of the research is presented remarkably even-handedly. He does not tell anyone how they should feel about Pete Rose. It may change your opinion, it may not. That is not his goal. The structure and tone is so accessible, so lovingly wrought, you cannot help but appreciate the way he draws you in, but does not draw you to a single conclusion. The only myth he explodes is that we think we know the story of Pete Rose. We didn't. And by we, I mean me.
And speaking of things we thought we knew but didn't, the second reason this is a singular achievement in baseball literature is NOT the story of Pete Rose. It is the story of Pete Rose, Jr.. A son as compelling as the father, for reasons identical and completely different.
Again, Kostya Kennedy needs no help from me. But you might. I'll buy this book and send (via Amazon Prime) it to the first ten people who email me their address at billscheft@yahoo.com. That's how much I think of this work.
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