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Descriptions du produit

Présentation de l'éditeur

What warps when you're traveling at warp speed?

What's the difference between a holodeck and a hologram?

What happens when you get beamed up?

What's the difference between a wormhole and a black hole?

What is antimatter, and why does the Enterprise need it?

Are time loops really possible, and can I kill my grandmother before I am born?

Discover the answers to these and many other fascinating questions from a renowned physicist and dedicated Trekker.

Featuring a section on the top ten physics bloopers and blunders in Star Trek as selected by Nobel-Prize winning physicists and other devout Trekkers!

"Today's science fiction is often tomorrow's science fact. The physics that underlines Star Trek is surely worth investigating. To confine our attention to terrestrial matters would be to limit the human spirit."
--From the foreword by Stephen Hawking

NATIONAL BESTSELLER!

This book was not prepared, approved, licensed, or endorsed by any entity involved in creating or producing the Star Trek television series or films. --Ce texte fait référence à une édition épuisée ou non disponible de ce titre.



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62 internautes sur 66 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
How Physicists Think About Star Trek Movies and Series 3 août 2001
Par Donald Mitchell - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
Did you know that many of the world's best physicists like to watch Star Trek, and then discuss what's right and wrong about the science displayed? Well, apparently they do.
Drawing on contacts within the scientific community and on-line bulletin boards, Professor Krauss has written a sprightly review of what physicists think about when they see these shows. He translates these observations into simple concepts that the average reader should be able to follow, assuming an interest in Star Trek or science.
As a non-scientist, I had always assumed that 70 percent of the "science" on a Star Trek show was just so much imagination. The reason I thought that was because I could see so many obvious errors (seeing phaser light in space, hearing sounds in space, effects occurring too soon on the space ship, holograms acting like they were made of matter, and permanent worm holes) based on what little I knew. Was I ever surprised to find out that these obvious errors were the bulk of all the errors in the shows!
Apparently the writers have been working closely with scientifically knowledgeable people to keep what is covered reasonably possible . . . along with some poetic license.
The physics of cosmology are fascinating, but I can quickly get lost in matching quantum mechanics to general relativity and so forth. I was also pleasantly surprised to see that I could follow the arguments much better when they used a familiar Star Trek episode as a reference. Like the child who learns math when it involves counting his or her own money, I can learn physics more easily when it relates to Star Trek. Very nice!
The book takes a look at the common Star Trek features like warp drive, transporters, replicators, phasers, sensors, subspace communications, and tractor beams. You also get special looks at less common features like multiple universes and special forms of radiation.
You can read this book from several perspectives as a result: (1) to appreciate what's happening in an episode; (2) to learn some science; (3) to think about where Star Trek could become real and where it is less likely to become so; and (4) what problems have to be solved in order for Star Trek technology to develop. I found the last perspective to be the most interesting. Professor Krauss's speculations about how rapidly technology might develop and what could be done with it were most fascinating.
Where the book fell down a little was in being quite strong in stating that certain "laws" of physics would never be changed. If we go back in 100 year increments, we find that a lot of earlier "laws" are later somewhat amended if not totally changed. That may happen in the future as well, as we learn more. Professor Krauss is a little too confident in many places that there is nothing else to learn. Most modern technology would look like Star Trek science fiction to someone living in 1700, despite being based on sound scientific principles not understood then.
After you finish enjoying this interesting book, think about what questions no one is trying to solve. Why not? What benefits would occur if they were solved? How could curiosity be stimulated about these questions?
Ask and answer important questions in interesting ways to make faster progress!
35 internautes sur 38 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Fun and enlightening 15 novembre 1998
Par Rick Hunter - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Relié
As both a Star Trek (old series) fan and popular science reader, I was greatly intrigued to see Lawrence Krauss' The Physics of Star Trek at my local bookstore. Often disappointed by past efforts to connect to the bandwagon of popular culture, I was delighted at how learned, clear, yet sprightly Krauss' short book was. In the first part, Krauss attempts nothing less than an explanation of Newtonian physics, general and special relativity, and other physics concepts to explain warp drives, tractor beams, wormholes, and other Star Trek staples that -- under the laws of physics as we now understand them -- are probably impossible. Subsequent chapters address and deconstruct the transporter beam, warp drive, etc. The clarity and humor of Krauss' writing is just wonderful. Perhaps the most amusing chapter is the last, in which Krauss lists his "top ten" Star Trek scientific bloopers -- events, plot devices, and the like that just could not occur. Because he is a trekker, Krauss does not treat these foibles with contempt or ridicule; as a scientist and writer, he ably outlines those errors.
16 internautes sur 16 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Not too shabby... 22 janvier 2001
Par "daverod" - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
As I looked through my local bookstore for an interesting read, I could not help but notice this interesting title in the Physics science section. Being a sporatic viewer of Star Trek myself, I picked it up for a closer look. As I read the first section of the book, I realized that it was more than blatant critique on scientific errors. Rather, it was an interesting view of future possibilities and also impossibilities in the field of science. In this book, Krauss explores the existence of things such as wormholes, black holes, and existence of other intelligent life in space. Krauss is also relentless in his discussion of Einstein and other renowned Physicists. He often writes about highly esoteric subject matter, but on the whole this book is well rounded and a relatively interesting read. However, keep in mind that one must have an interest in science, specifically fields such as quantum mechanics and relativity.
15 internautes sur 15 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
A Fun Book 14 décembre 2005
Par T. Hooper - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
Lawrence Krauss examines the technology of the Star Trek universe and discusses whether such technology is possible or not according to physics as we know it today. As it turns out, most of the technology is either impossible or improbable when considering the laws of physics. For example, to use warp drive or impulse drive, it would take more energy than the entire planet uses at present. Another example, which would probably be impossible, is the transporter. Krauss raises the issue of whether the transporter transmits the matter or just the information of a person. If it transmits the matter, there is the problem of scanning, storing, and transmitting the data of the location of each molecule,--a feat that would take an astronomical amount of calculating power. If it only transmits the data, then the transporter is effectively a human replicator. If that is the case, what do they do with the original body? Also it raises a lot of ethical issues as well.

I really recommend this for those fans of Star Trek who are interested in finding out if the science in the Star Trek world is feasible or not. It's very easy to read and very entertaining too. Check it out.
15 internautes sur 16 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
Today's Science Fiction Is Often Tomorrow's Science Fact 25 février 2000
Par "blackjewel" - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: Broché
Nearly everyone on the planet has seen at least one episode of Star Trek. At the same time, nearly everyone has wondered about certain aspects of the show. For example, if their civilization is so advanced, how come no one has invented a cure for baldness? On the more technical side, certain questions pop up again and again. For example, what really happens during the process of "beaming up"? Why is warp 10 not attainable? How does a tractor beam work?...
Like Mr. Wizard, Lawrence Krauss, who holds a Ph.D. in physics, answers all your questions - or most of them. All the major topics are covered, including a few minor ones. The text is non-technical, clear and concise, but also complete. Although it is impossible to discuss certain ideas without the use of graphs and equations, Krauss keeps them to a minimum.
For each particular advanced technology of the future, the theory behind each application is dissected, explained, and examined. Also, given present day knowledge, the author examines the theoretical or practical obstacles that would have to be overcome in order to achieve this technology. In transporter technology, for example, what exactly would be involved? Would the actual atoms and molecules have to be sent, or would just the information (code) be sufficient?
Would both (atoms and information) be necessary and how would such a task be accomplished, if at all?
This book is highly recommended. Even if you are not a Star Trek fan, you will be interested. This book is easy to read, faithful to the physics, full of Star Trek trivia and always entertaining. Voyager and Deep Space Nine episodes are also mentioned, when relevant to the particular topic under discussion.
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