undrgrnd Cliquez ici NEWNEEEW nav-sa-clothing-shoes Cloud Drive Photos cliquez_ici ECFR_GNO_Flyout Cliquez ici Acheter Fire Achetez Kindle Paperwhite cliquez_ici Jeux Vidéo
Ou
Version MP3 incluse GRATUITEMENT

Plus d'options
Purcell: The Fairy Queen; Dido & Aeneas (2 CDs)
 
Zoom
Voir une image plus grande (avec un zoom)
 

Purcell: The Fairy Queen; Dido & Aeneas (2 CDs)

9 février 2014 | Format : MP3

EUR 16,59 (TVA incluse le cas échéant)
Commandez l'album CD à EUR 18,17 et obtenez gratuitement la version MP3.
L'album CD est vendu et expédié par Amazon EU Sàrl . Veuillez consulter les Conditions générales sur les coûts en cas d'annulation de commande. Ne s'applique pas aux commandes de cadeaux. Commandez pour sauvegarder la version numérique de cet album dans votre bibliothèque Amazon Music.

Applications Amazon Music

Applications Amazon Music
Titre Artiste
Durée
Popularité  
30
1
6:48
30
2
2:42
30
3
2:05
30
4
2:50
30
5
2:16
30
6
2:48
30
7
1:14
30
8
3:01
30
9
2:58
30
10
2:18
30
11
2:32
30
12
1:57
30
13
2:14
30
14
6:37
30
15
5:24
30
16
0:42
30
17
2:15
30
18
4:04
30
19
1:27
30
20
1:44
30
21
2:40
30
22
7:48
30
23
3:43
30
24
0:55
30
25
3:06
30
26
2:33
Disc 2
30
1
1:28
30
2
2:30
30
3
2:25
30
4
1:50
30
5
1:10
30
6
2:57
30
7
3:33
30
8
0:54
30
9
2:17
30
10
1:09
30
11
5:15
30
12
2:06
30
13
1:36
30
14
5:13
30
15
3:19
30
16
5:28
30
17
3:44
30
18
2:29
30
19
1:20
30
20
6:05
30
21
2:17
30
22
3:19
30
23
3:40
30
24
6:29
30
25
4:59
Votre compte Amazon Music n'est actuellement associé à aucun pays. Pour profiter de la musique Premium, allez sur votre Bibliothèque musicale et transférez votre compte à Amazon.fr (FR).
  

Détails sur le produit

  • Date de sortie d'origine : 1 janvier 2001
  • Date de sortie: 9 février 2014
  • Nombre de disques: 2
  • Label: Universal Music Division Decca Records France
  • Copyright: (C) 2001 Decca Music Group Limited
  • Métadonnées requises par les maisons de disque: les métadonnées des fichiers musicaux contiennent un identifiant unique d’achat. En savoir plus.
  • Durée totale: 2:36:13
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B003CISUPO
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 5.0 étoiles sur 5 1 commentaire client
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 185.673 en Albums (Voir les 100 premiers en Albums)

Commentaires en ligne

5.0 étoiles sur 5
5 étoiles
1
4 étoiles
0
3 étoiles
0
2 étoiles
0
1 étoiles
0
Voir le commentaire client
Partagez votre opinion avec les autres clients

Meilleurs commentaires des clients

Format: CD Achat vérifié
je l'avais écoutée sur Radio Classique je ne la connaissais pas auparavant, mais cette interprétation m'a enchantée. J'aime un peu moins Didon et Enéee à chacun ses goûts et ses émotions. Très bien à recommander pour l'écouter et réécouter.
Remarque sur ce commentaire 2 personnes ont trouvé cela utile. Avez-vous trouvé ce commentaire utile ? Oui Non Commentaire en cours d'envoi...
Merci pour votre commentaire.
Désolé, nous n'avons pas réussi à enregistrer votre vote. Veuillez réessayer
Signaler un abus

Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: HASH(0x8c1e5d14) étoiles sur 5 4 commentaires
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x8c18d024) étoiles sur 5 Baroque brilliance unparalleled 18 mars 2013
Par Jurgen Lawrenz - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD
What motivates people like myself to collect records - sometimes a dozen and more versions of the same music? The seemingly obvious answer is: every recording can bring intriguing perspectives to life; and unless it is outrageously poor or blatant self-indulgence by an artist, this constitutes an enrichment of one's musical experience.
Nonetheless over a course of years of auditioning, one's own perspective will subtly change and crystallise eventually into an idealised image of a performance that fully answers to the composite of many impressions in one's mind. If then, by chance, a performance crosses one's path that seems to fit this kaleidoscope as if tailor made, then the lucky listener might install it in his or her own mind as "definitive". Well understood - definitive for that one listener!
It does not entitle that listener to assume that this performance is "the best". The silly notion, that one or another recording can be "the best", will not stand up to any logical scrutiny. Thus, whenever you read this claim in any reviews, you can safely dismiss it as an overenthusiastic self-projection of the writer.
Accordingly I will now swallow my own medicine and refrain from calling this recording "the best", for either of the works. In one sense it undoubtedly is, but even then, it must suffer some criticisms which, with the best will in the world, I cannot overlook.
The first of these is, whose music are we actually listening to in The Fairy Queen? Evidently Purcell's; but the text has been arranged (whatever that may mean) by Imogen Holst and the music by Britten. Purcell himself would probably not recognise it as his own work! The performance is with modern instruments and thoroughly unidiomatic. Since I wasn't alive in 1695, I can't judge how appropriate the singing is, but singing is even harder to recapture in its true idiom, because it is not just the throats of people, but their minds and emotions that are involved. No present-day singer could possibly feel the music the way one of Purcell's singers did.
Why then bother with expressions like "best"? Because in the end, and despite all these reservations, this is a wonderful, fantastic, exhilarating entertainment. Purcell's era was not especially concerned (as we tend to be) with music qua art. To them it was entertainment, pure and simple. And this recording is better done than all others - indeed "the best", for my money! Holst and Britten, and their whole crew, obviously enjoyed the verbal and musical spectacle to the full; and any listener whose mind is not closed to the value of genuine, exuberant pleasure will have a very happy hour or two delving into this performance.
Dido and Aeneas is not quite on the same high level, despite Janet Baker's presence. Herincx is a bit of an oaf. The Belinda is charming in her naive, songful advice; the witches very funny (I always wonder if they were meant to be threatening back then?); and Baker sings a most moving Farewell.
Altogether, a set you should not miss if you love Purcell's music. So many so-called "authentic" performance don't give you a farthing's worth of fun. Here is full measure of it.
3 internautes sur 3 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x8c18d2f4) étoiles sur 5 ABSOLUTELY GORGEOUS DIDO 14 mars 2013
Par John J. Schauer - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD Achat vérifié
O.K., I'm obviously at the opposite end of the spectrum from the other reviewer of this set, but I have to say this has become my favorite recording of "Dido and Aeneas." ("The Fairy Queen" shares many of the virtues of the Dido recording, even though it is a different conductor.) Does it reflect this week's notion of how Baroque music is "supposed" to be performed? No. Purists who are seeking that should be able to figure out from the musical forces and date of recording that they should just keep walking by. And let me point out that I am not ignorant of musicological matters--I hold master's degrees in music history from both Northwestern and Princeton universities, with an emphasis on Baroque repertoire. It's just that in my book, musicianship trumps scholarship every time. I'm perfectly aware that the two are not mutually exclusive, just as it isn't completely impossible to find a person who is both physically beautiful and highly intelligent, but more often than not the two qualities do not manifest in the same person. I find everything about this performance (and I've heard quite a few of them) to be gorgeous; interestingly, Janet Baker sounds younger and fresher on this recording than on her previous recording for Anthony Lewis. George Malcom's ;inventive harpsichord continue is every bit as delightful as that of Thuston Dart's on the Lewis recording (and that's saying a lot). And yes, I very much appreciate that the sorceress and witches don't try to sound like Margaret Hamilton's Wicked Witch of the West in "The Wizard of Oz," a performing cliche I find quite tedious. Baroque operas are filled with witches, sorceresses and enchantresses, and I cannot believe they were all meant to be sung through the nose.

I also wonder how so many people have been convinced that Baroque vocal music should be sung without vibrato. In my formal studies and since, I have earnestly sought to find the primary source for this notion, and so far no one I have asked has managed to come up with an answer. The primary 18th-century treatise on singing, Pietro Tosi's "The Art of the Florid Song," makes no mention of it. Certainly vibrato occurs naturally in virtually all adult singing voices, and singers who strive for that white, vibratoless tone have to work to suppress it. When I had a conversation about this with conductor Nicholas McGegan (who knows a little something about Baroque performance practice), he concurred, pointing out that we know for certain that Francesca Cuzzoni, for one, had a marked vibrato (she was described by historian Charles Burney as having "a native warble" in her voice that facilitated her singing of fast passagework), a quality that didn't prevent her from becoming one of Handel's greatest star sopranos.

So if you want beautiful music vibrantly sung and played, this set is for you. And if you're an absolute purist, you really shouldn't be buying any recordings at all, since they didn't have CDs in the 18th century.
1 internautes sur 1 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x8c18d5d0) étoiles sur 5 Un-HIP Purcell 12 octobre 2015
Par Stephen Midgley - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD
This two-disc reissue brings us two very different Purcell opera recordings from the early seventies: 'The Fairy Queen', with the English Chamber Orchestra conducted by Benjamin Britten; and 'Dido and Aeneas' with the Aldeburgh Festival Strings directed by Steuart Bedford.

Taking The Fairy Queen first, we get the majority of Purcell's music, but quite heavily re-organised and in places re-scored by Britten. However, it is by and large a vivid, energetic and enjoyable performance enetering admirably into the spirit of Purcell's wonderful music. This was actually the first vinyl recording I ever had of the work, I got huge enjoyment from it, and to me it still sounds pretty good today. The distinguished singing cast are largely excellent, especially on the female side: Jennifer Vyvyan, Mary Wells, Norma Burrowes, Alfreda Hodgson, with equally good work from Owen Brannigan, John Shirley-Quirk, James Bowman and Charles Brett. Peter Pears takes some of the tenor roles, but I can't say I find his voice at all acceptable in Purcell's music - his strangulated tones reminding me more of Dudley Moore's sketch on YouTube (look up Little Miss Britten or some such) than anything else.

This is Purcell on modern instruments, of course, with little sign of historically informed performance. Some of Britten's tempi are a bit ponderous, especially in Oberon's birthday celebration 'Now the night is chas'd away (CD1, track 2) - this sounds like the most funereal birthday anyone could have. The English Chamber Orchestra do excellent work throughout, and on the whole this is much more than a curiosity - rather a genuinely insightful and enjoyable performance of one of the most delightful masterpieces of the English baroque.

Purcell's magical semi-opera spills over onto the second CD, and this then continues with 'Dido'. This is a rather unconvincing performance, again with distinguished lead singers, but here rather below their best – and that includes Janet Baker, Felicity Lott, Norma Burrowes and others. The same comments as above apply to Peter Pears' Aeneas, and Robert Tear's First Sailor sounds even more strangled if that's possible. Bedford's direction is not too bad, I suppose, but somehow the beautiful instrumental textures of Purcell's music just do not make themselves felt here, and for this reason I really missed the period instruments of the great Purcell recordings which are amply available today. Purcell knew what he was doing and what sounds he expected, and they're not here.

There are no texts in the booklet, no background notes, but otherwise adequate documentation and useful scene-by-scene summaries of the plot of each work. I would say this set is worth having for Britten's 'Fairy Queen'.
4 internautes sur 17 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
HASH(0x8c18daf8) étoiles sur 5 Cannot stand listening to this performance 12 juillet 2005
Par Leonardo A. - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format: CD
Time passes fast, and 1970 is a prehistorical age for this kind of music.

I had the bad idea to buy this recording: Britten is directing this music disregarding his own annotations on the scores he adapted !! (I had to study them for a concert).

But worst, soloists are singing in a terrible "italian melodrammatic style" (as we say "with big potatoes in their mouth"). The chorus is too large, the tempo too slow, terribly slow. The brasses are untuned, the orchestra is not convincing at all.

Dido and Aeneas follows the same destiny.

Want to buy back my CDs :)?
Ces commentaires ont-ils été utiles ? Dites-le-nous

Rechercher des articles similaires par rubrique