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Regency Buck [Anglais] [Broché]

Georgette Heyer
3.3 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (3 commentaires client)
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Descriptions du produit

Extrait

One

Newark was left behind and the post- chaise-and-four entered on a stretch of flat country which offered little to attract the eye, or occasion remark. Miss Taverner withdrew her gaze from the landscape and addressed her companion, a fair youth who was lounging in his corner of the chaise somewhat sleepily surveying the back of the nearest post-boy. 'How tedious it is to be sitting still for so many hours at a stretch!' she remarked. 'When do we reach Grantham, Perry?'

Her brother yawned. 'Lord, I don't know! It was you who would go to London.'

Miss Taverner made no reply to this, but picked up a Traveller's Guide from the seat beside her, and began to flutter the leaves over. Young Sir Peregrine yawned again, and observed that the new pair of wheelers, put in at Newark, were good-sized strengthy beasts, very different from the last pair, which had both of them been touched in the wind.

Miss Taverner was deep in the Traveller's Guide, and agreed to this without raising her eyes from the closely printed page.

She was a fine young women, rather above the average height, and had been used for the past four years to hearing herself proclaimed a remarkably handsome girl. She could not, however, admired her own beauty, which was of the type she was inclined to despise. She had rather have had black hair; she thought the fairness of her gold curls insipid. Happily, her brows and lashes were dark and her eyes which were startlingly blue (in the manner of a wax doll, she once scornfully told her brother) had a directness and a fire which gave a great deal of character to her face. At first glance one might write her down a mere Dresden china miss, but a second glance would inevitably discover the intelligence in her eyes, and the decided air of resolution in the curve of her mouth.

She was dressed neatly, but not in the first style of fashion, in a plain round gown of French cambric, frilled round the neck with scalloped lace; and a close mantle of twilled sarcenet. A poke-bonnet of basket-willow with a striped velvet ribbon rather charmingly framed her face, and a pair of York tan gloves were drawn over her hands, and buttoned tightly round her wrists.

Her brother, who had resumed his slumbrous scrutiny of the post-boy's back, resembled her closely. His hair was more inclined to brown, and his eyes less deep in colour than hers, but he must always be known for her brother. He was a year younger that Miss Taverner, and, either from habit or carelessness, was very much in the habit of permitting her to order things as she chose.
'It is fourteen miles from Newark to Grantham,' announced Miss Taverner, raising her eyes from the Traveller's Guide. 'I had not thought it had been so far.' She bent over the book again. 'It says here - it is Kearsley's Entertaining Guide, you know, which you procured for me in Scarborough - that is a neat and populous town on the River Witham. It is supposed to have been a Roman station, by the remains of a castle which have been dug up. I must say, I should like to explore there if we have the time, Perry.'

'Oh, lord, you know ruins always look the same!' objected Sir Peregrine, digging his hands into the pockets of his buckskin breeches. 'I tell you what it is, Judith: if you're set on poking about all the castles on the way we shall be a full week on the road. I'm all for pushing forward to London.'

'Very well,' submitted Miss Taverner, closing the Traveller's Guide, and laying it on the seat. 'We shall bespeak an early breakfast at the George, then, and you must tell them at what hour you will have the horses put-to.'

'I thought we were to lie at the Angel,' remarked Sir Peregrine.

'No,' replied his sister decidedly. 'You have forgot the wretched account the Mincemans gave us of the comfort to be had there. It is the George and I wrote to engage our rooms, on account of Mrs Minceman warning me of the fuss and to-do she had once when they would have had her go up two pair of stairs to a miserable apartment at the back of the house.'

Sir Peregrine turned his head to grin amiably at her. 'Well, I don't fancy they'll succeed in fobbing you off with a back room, Ju.'

'Certainly not,' replied Miss Taverner, with a severity somewhat belied by the twinkle in her eye.

'No, that's certain,' pursued Peregrine. 'But what I'm waiting to see, my love, is the way you'll handle the old man.'

Miss Taverner looked a little anxious. 'I could handle Papa, Perry, couldn't I? If only Lord Worth is not a subject to gout! I think that was the only time when Papa became quite unmanageable.'

'All old men have gout,' said Peregrine.

Miss Taverner sighed, acknowledging the truth of this pronouncement.

'It's my belief,' added Peregrine, 'that he don't want us to come to town. Come to think of it, didn't he say so?'

Miss Taverner loosened the strings of her reticule, and groped in it for a slender packet of letters. She spread one of these open. '"Lord Worth presents his compliments to Sir Peregrine and Miss Taverner and thinks it inadvisable for them to attempt the fatigues of a journey to London at this season. His lordship will do himself the honour of calling upon them in Yorkshire when next he is in the North." And that,' concluded Miss Taverner, 'was written three months ago - you may see the date for yourself, Perry: 29th June, 1811 - and not even in his own hand. I am sure it is a secretary wrote it, or those horrid lawyers. Depend upon it, Lord Worth has forgotten our very existence, because you know all the arrangements about the money we should have were made by the lawyers, and whenever there is any question to be settle it is they who write about it. So if he does not like us to come to London it is quite his fault for not having made the least attempt to come to us, or to tell us what we must do. I think him a very poor guardian. I wish my father had named one of our friends in Yorkshire, someone we are acquainted with. It is very disagreeable to be under the governance of a stranger.'

'Well, if Lord Worth don't want to be at the trouble of ordering our lives, so much the better,' said Peregrine. 'You want to cut a dash in town, and I daresay I can find plenty of amusement if we haven't a crusty old guardian to spoil to fun.'

'Yes,' agreed Miss Taverner, a trifle doubtfully. 'But in common civility we must ask his permission to set up house in London. I do hope we shall not find him set against us, regarding it as an imposition, I mean; perhaps thinking that my uncle might rather have been appointed than himself. It must appear very singular to him. It is an awkward business, Perry.'

A grunt being the only response to this, she said no more, but leaned back in her corner and perused the unsatisfactory communications she had received from Lord Worth.

It was an awkward business. His lordship, who must, she reflected, be going on for fifty-five or -six years of age, showed a marked disinclination to trouble himself with the affairs of his wards, and although this might in some circumstances be reckoned a good, in others it must be found to be a pronounced evil. Neither she nor Peregrine had ever been farther from home than to Scarborough. They knew nothing of London, and had no acquaintance there to guide them. The only persons known to them in the whole town were their uncle, and a female cousin living respectably, but in a small way, in Kensington. This lady Miss Taverner must rely upon to present her into society, for her uncle, a retired Admiral of the Blue, had lived upon terms of such mutual dislike and mistrust with her father as must preclude her from seeking either his support or his acquaintance.

Sir John Taverner had never been heard to speak with the smallest degree of kindness of his brother, and when his gout was at its worst, he had been used to refer to him as a damned scoundrelly fellow whom he would not trust the length of his own yard-arm. There were very few people whom Sir John had ever spoken of with much complaisance, but he had from time to time given his children such instances of their uncle's conduct as convinced them that he must indeed be a shabby creature, and no mere victim of Sir John's prejudice.

Lord Worth might think it singular that he who had not set eyes on his old friend once in the last ten years should have been appointed guardian to his children, but they, knowing Sir John, found it easily understandable. Sir John, always irascible, could never be brought during the last years of his life to live on terms of cordiality with his neighbours. There must always be quarrels. But from having lived secluded on his estates ever since the death of his wife and not having met Lord Worth above three times in a dozen years, he had had no quarrel with him, and had come by insensible degrees to consider him the very person to have the care of his children in the event of his own decease. Worth was a capital fellow; Sir John could trust him to administer the very considerable fortune he would leave his children; there was no fear of Worth warming his own pockets. The thing was done, the Will drawn up without the smallest reference to it being made either to Worth or to the children themselves - a circumstance, Miss Taverner could not but reflect, entirely in keeping with all Sir John's high-handed dealings.

She was aroused from these musings by the rattle and bump of the chaise-wheels striking cobblestones, and looked up to find that they had reached Grantham.

As they drew into the town the post-boys were obliged to slacken the pace considerably, so much traffic was there in the streets, and such a press of people thronging the pathways, and even the road itself.

All was bustle and animation, and when the chaise came at last within sight of the George, a huge red-brick structure on the main street, Miss Taverner was surprised to see any number of coaches, curricles, gigs, and phaetons drawn up before it.

'Well,' she said, 'I am glad I followed Mrs Minc...

Revue de presse

"Wonderful characters, elegant, witty writing, perfect period detail, and rapturously romantic. Georgette Heyer achieves what the rest of us only aspire to." (Katie Fforde)

"My favourite historical novelist -- stylish, romantic, sharp, and witty. Her sense of period is superb, her heroines are enterprising, and her heroes dashing. I owe her many happy hours." (Margaret Drabble)

"A writer of great wit and style ... I've read her books to ragged shreds." (Kate Fenton Daily Telegraph)

"Sparkling." (Independent)

Détails sur le produit

  • Broché: 368 pages
  • Editeur : Arrow (20 juin 2013)
  • Langue : Anglais
  • ISBN-10: 009958557X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099585572
  • Dimensions du produit: 19,6 x 13 x 2,6 cm
  • Moyenne des commentaires client : 3.3 étoiles sur 5  Voir tous les commentaires (3 commentaires client)
  • Classement des meilleures ventes d'Amazon: 301.430 en Livres anglais et étrangers (Voir les 100 premiers en Livres anglais et étrangers)
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Commentaires client les plus utiles
Par Betty
Format:Broché
Ce roman de Georgette Heyer est sans doute le plus inspiré de Jane Austen (notamment Orgueil et Préjugés):
-l'héroïne Judith Taverner (20 ans) s'oppose au héros Julian, comte de Worth, par orgueil et sous l'influence de préjugés: en effet, elle est vexée de ses reproches et le voit comme insupportable en raison de son apparent mépris lors de leur première rencontre (Orgueil et Préjugés);
-elle lui préfère un autre homme, plus complimenteur, qui se révèle plein de faussetés (Orgueil et Préjugés);
-Julian et Judith ont de fortes personnalités et s'affrontent presque à chaque rencontre (Orgueil et Préjugés);
-Julian est le plus raisonnable des deux, même s'il aime à la provoquer, et c'est lui qui tire d'embarras Peregrine Taverner le frère de Judith, qui lui sauve la vie et enfin sauve l'honneur de Judith; il y a donc une forte supériorité de Julian qui rappelle le héros masculin d'Emma (Knightley);
-cependant l'héroïne reste attachante, en raison de sa supériorité intellectuelle et morale par rapport à son frère par exemple.
Ce roman est solidement agréable mais sans le génie des dialogues de Frederica ou des rebondissements de The Convenient Marriage, avec un nombre de personnages secondaires bien typés et amusants inférieur à ceux de The Masqueraders ou de The Grand Sophy.
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Par Betty
Format:Broché|Achat vérifié
Ce roman de Georgette Heyer est sans doute le plus inspiré de Jane Austen (notamment Orgueil et Préjugés):
-l'héroïne Judith Taverner (20 ans) s'oppose au héros Julian, comte de Worth, par orgueil et sous l'influence de préjugés: en effet, elle est vexée de ses reproches et le voit comme insupportable en raison de son apparent mépris lors de leur première rencontre (Orgueil et Préjugés);
-elle lui préfère un autre homme, plus complimenteur, qui se révèle plein de faussetés (Orgueil et Préjugés);
-Julian et Judith ont de fortes personnalités et s'affrontent presque à chaque rencontre (Orgueil et Préjugés);
-Julian est le plus raisonnable des deux, même s'il aime à la provoquer, et c'est lui qui tire d'embarras Peregrine Taverner le frère de Judith, qui lui sauve la vie et enfin sauve l'honneur de Judith; il y a donc une forte supériorité de Julian qui rappelle le héros masculin d'Emma (Knightley);
-cependant l'héroïne reste attachante, en raison de sa supériorité intellectuelle et morale par rapport à son frère par exemple.
Ce roman est solidement agréable mais sans le génie des dialogues de Frederica ou des rebondissements de The Convenient Marriage, avec un nombre de personnages secondaires bien typés et amusants inférieur à ceux de The Masqueraders ou de The Grand Sophy.
Lire la suite ›
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4.0 étoiles sur 5 Unputdownable. 28 septembre 2013
Format:Format Kindle|Achat vérifié
Georgette Heyer spins historical figures in amongst fictional ones to brilliant effect. At times improbable but inn't that part of the fun?
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Commentaires client les plus utiles sur Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.3 étoiles sur 5  87 commentaires
22 internautes sur 25 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 My very favorite Heyer Regency! 20 mai 2001
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Poche
I have read all of Georgette Heyer's books, and Regency Buck remains my favorite -- after a few dozen readings! The mysterious plot, the wonderful dialogue, the splendid Regency settings, the chemistry between the impulsive heroine and the sardonic hero -- all these add up to a Regency masterpiece and the ultimate rainy night comfort read! (I did not, however, enjoy the audio-book version read by Flo Gibson; she makes all the characters -- even the magnificent Lord Worth -- sound odiously prissy).
18 internautes sur 22 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 Wholly captivating!! 27 décembre 2000
Par "storynut" - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
I'm an avid Georgette Heyer fan, & I'll say this of her-among all the Regency authors, she's the best!! With her its not just romance alone, but humour,sarcasm,wit all get combined to produce a novel to captivate the reader. This book tells about the vivacious heroine Judith Taverner & her battle(of wits)against Lord Worth. It also has a little pinch of mystery- who wants Peregrine dead? But if i tell u the answer to that, u won't read it, will you? so i'll keep mum, & go ahead, buy this book. You won't regret it!
14 internautes sur 17 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 Wonderful Regency Humor 24 avril 2000
Par "yettaloyd" - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Poche
Georgette Heyer has no equal when it comes to that wonderful brand of regency fun and laughter. Her research is so true to that age I feel as though I am riding in Hyde Park with the characters, or on the battlefield at Waterloo, Regency Buck lead me to read "An Infamous Army" And many of her other wonderful books. I have had to hunt in second hand book shops, and garage sales for the books I now have. Most are really dogged eared, and faded, and have pages falling out. I can"t tell you how happy, I am to be able to buy NEW - UNREAD - copies..where I am the first reader to leaf thru the pages of these wonderful stories. I hope to be able to purchase all of her works. She was one in a million.
6 internautes sur 6 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
4.0 étoiles sur 5 My First Heyer 27 juin 2009
Par labrat - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Broché
Nearly forty years ago I bought this paperback, after staring at it at Woolworth's for several weeks, for the whopping price of 75 cents. There began my love affair with all things Regency, and Georgette Heyer's Regencies in particular.

I am knocking a star off this because, though Heyer's writing craft is divine, her two main characters, in retrospect, are not very appealing. Worth is overly arrogant and Judith is childishly temperamental.

What I will give is props to Heyer who, with the exception of the immediate Worth/Taverner family connections, used historical figures as filler. What a tremendous amount of research she must have done! From Worcester to Poole to "Poodle" Byng, she used real people of the Regency Era to flesh out the rest of her tale.

Brava, Georgette!
8 internautes sur 9 ont trouvé ce commentaire utile 
5.0 étoiles sur 5 One of my favorite Heyer books i've read so far.... 24 mars 2000
Par Un client - Publié sur Amazon.com
Format:Relié
I'm not much of a fan of romance novels, but i must say that Georgette Heyer's books are pretty good. Regency Buck is certainly one of her best. Judith is a strong willed, stubborn girl who's come out for the season with her brother against the judgement of her profoundly disliked, but actually never met, guardian. The very first time she meets him is when her carriage got stuck in a ditch or something while she was on her way to london. They both seem to dislike each other from the moment they meet, although Judith has no idea who he is at first. Regency Buck has lots of fun and humorous scenes that would make you laugh. As always from what i've seen of Heyer's books, the ending is a pleasant surprise and a happy one. It makes you believe in love all over again.
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